100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 26, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

CONSIDER CLASSES
TO BE EXEMPTED
(Continued from Page One)
success in technical careers is open to
doubt.,
"Each case is to be considered by the
district exemption boards on its own
merits. Students in technical schools
are in no wise exempt as a class. No
classes of persons are exempt from
the operation of the selective draft ex-
cept those specified in the act."
Statistics of Graduate Engineers
Graduates in engineering 1895 to
1916 inclusive:
Chemical engineering ...........340
Civil engineering ........'......11,621
Electrical engineering ......... 6,357
Mechanical engineering ........11,291
Mining engineering.............3,195
Metallurgical engineering ...... 150
Engineering (general .......... 1,897
Marine engineering.............15
Textile engineering............. 41
Agricultural engineering ''.... 1
Total .....................11,777
Except for the years 1915 and 1916
these members include both bachelar
and graduate degrees.
Tota number of graduates in engin-
eering in 1895 was 752. Graduates in
engineering in 1916:
Chemica engineering ...........340
Civil engineering.............1,236
Electrical engineering. 1,098
Mechanical engineering ..... 1,164
Mining engineering ............ 267
Metallurgical engineering ...... 12
Engineering not specified... 163"
Marine engineering ............ 9
Textile engineering .............12
Agricultural engineering ...... 5
Total ..................... 4 306
Students in engineering in 1916:
General engineering .......... 5,485
Chemical engineering .......... 2,774
Civil engineering .............. 7,251
Electrical engineering ......... 7,098
Mechanical engineering ........ 7,707
Mining engineering ............ 1,790
Other types of engineering .... 1,001
Total .....................33,106
Likely Football Coach Not Settled
Wisconsin, July 25.-The position of
football coach of the University of
Wisconsin has not been definitely filled
as yet. Former Coach Richards is the
likeliest of the men under considera-
tion and will undoubtedly make good
if chosen.
The Farmers & Mechanics Bank
South Main Street State Street Office
Corner Huro l 330 So. State St.
A 0000 STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED

Coming Events
(Summer Session Lectures)
Open to all students. Lectures take
place in Auditorium of Natural Science
building unless otherwise stated.. '
Thursday, July 26, 5 o'clock-The Sig-
nificance of Sex. Professor O. C.
Glaser.
8 o'clock-Educational Motion Pic-
ures.
Friday, July 27, 5 o'clock-The Li-
brary of Congress, (Illustrated.)
Professor W. W. Bishop.
8 o'clock-The Cartoons in "London
Punch" on the American Civil War.
Professor E. D. Adams.
Monday, July 30, 5 o'clock-A Mark-
ing System for Secondary Schools,
Assistant Professor F. S. Breed.
8 o'clock-Recital, The Class ' in
Shakespearean Reading.
Tuesday, July 31, 5 o'clock-Ancient
and Modern Athens, (Illustrated.)
Professor J. G. Winter.
8 o'clock-Acquired Disease as a
Factor in Racial Deterioration. As-
sistant Professor C. V. Weller.
Wednesday, Aug. 1, 5 o'clock-The Bi-
ology of Youth and Age, (Illustrat-
ed.) Professor F. C. Newcombe.
8 o'clock-Concert, Faculty of the
University School of Music. (Hill
Auditorium.)
Thursday, Aug. 2, 5 o'clock-Maurice
Barres, (Illustrated.) Professor A.
G. Canfield.
8 o'clock-Educational Motion Pie-
ures.
Friday, Aug. 3, 5 o'clock - The New
Movements in Poetry. Mr. L. L.
Bryson.
Saturday, Aug. 4, 5:30 o'clock a. m.-
Excursion to the Island of Put-in-
Bay, Lake Erie, under the direction
of Assistant Professor I. D. Scott,
via Michigan Central Railroad to
Detroit, and Steamer to Put-in-Bay.
Monday, Aug. 6, 5 o'clock-Geography
and Politics. Professor R. G. Gettel.
7:30 o'clock. Visitors' Night at the
Observatory. Admissionby ticket
only.
U. S MARINES REJOICE OVER
LOWERING OF PRICE OF EGGS
Peking, China, July 25.-Hark!-ye
diner of palatial hotels and travelers
of leisure, and list to a tale of far-
away China, the land of mystery, which
incidentally revolutionizes the much
touted "high cost of living."
Again the United States marines are
heard from but this time in regards to
"eats!" Let it be suffice to say that
they are living good for eggs are now
selling here for thirty cents a hundred.

SiOEOC1 SIUDENIS IAJ[
1BHIP IOPUT-IN-AY
Excursionists to Visit Caves at Fa-
mous Island; Party Leaves
Next Friday

Can
Are you
If, on y
some trip
cat crosse

Geology students and all others who mained in
are interested will leave at 6:37 short cut

You Blelieve It?-An Ency-
elopedia of Superstitions-Ooh!
superstitious? the Occult Sciences," in the reading
our way home from a tire- room of the Library.
down town, a coal black A quaintness of phraseology, not to
say anything about the psychological
d your path, a horseshoe re- interest involved in puzzling over the
your way unheeded, or a possible solution as to how some of
was taken under a ladder these ideas could have fascinated,
ror fell from your hands on haunted and fastened its tentacles of
lk on Friday the 13th, would fear upon the people of the past cen-
the world contained noth- turies, makes the work a masterpiece.
nisery and misfortune until "Throw away lettered paper in
f your days? wrath and you will lose your wits,"
re the commonest of super- and "if a young man takes food upon
A more elaborate and thor- his plate and leaves it, he will un-
giving all the varieties of doubtedly have an ugly wife," are but
'ns known for the last 6,000 a few of the many superstitions that
be found in the "Encyclo- have been handed down from past gen-
Superstitions, Folklore and erations.

o'clock, eastern time, next Friday
morning on the annual excursion to
Put-in-Bay via the Michigan Central
railroad to Detroit and steamer to the
island.
The excursion was scheduled for
Saturday, but the change in the pro-
gram was made to secure better ac-
commodations on the boat.
A great deal of time can be saved
if the excursionists bring their lunches
or purchase them on the boat as the
steamer is due to be in Put-in-Bay
about noon.
Historical and Geological Features
Put-in-Bay is one of the numerous
islands situated in the western part
of Lake Erie. Historically, it is noted
for the scene of the great naval bat-
tle between Commodore Perry of the
American forces and Commodore
Barclay of the British fleet. The name
was derived from the fact that Com-
modore Perry put into the bay im-
mediately after the engagement. A
memorial shaft, commemorating the
victory of Perry over the British, was
recently erected on the island.
The island is also famous for its
luscious grapes, because the temper-
ing effect of the lake on climate pre-
vents frosts from ruining the crops.
Geologically it is most interesting
in the study of the shore features,
which is especially noted for the wave
action on the limestone rock. The
work of continental glaciers will also
be studied.
Students Visit Crystal Cave
Several small but interesting caves
will be visited. The caves are un-
usual in manner of formation. Crystal
cave, the largest of the caves, is lined
with beautiful large crystals of the
sky-blue mineral, celestite. The cave
is probably the most unique when
classed with the other caves situated
throughout the world.
Opportunities will be given to visit
all the different points of interest in
the vicinity of the cases before the
boat returns at 4:20 o'clock for De-
troit.
120-Mile Boat Ride
Aside from the many features on the
island the trip offers a delightful boat
ride of 120 miles on the Detroit river

and a mir
the sidewa
you think
ing but m
the end of
These a
stitions.1
ough list,
superstitio
years, can
pedia ofs

.1

RED CROS WORKERS SEND TWO
BOXES OF SUPPLIES THIS WEEK
In spite of the heat the work con-
tinues steadily at the Red Cross head-
quarters on Huron street. Two boxes
of supplies will be shipped this week.
One of the cases contains 30 bathrobes
for convalescent patients. Eight sin-
gle bed outfits fill the other one. Each
set consists of all that is needed for
the care of one patient such as sheets,

pillow slips and towels. The material
for 12 dozen sheets has been cut off
and they will soon be finished.
Subscribe for The Wolverine and re-
ceive a Student Directory free.
C H OP S U E Y
Open During Summer School
11 A.M. to 1 P. M.
MICHIGAN INN
Phone 948-R 601 E. Liborty St.

S HEE HA N( CO.
Summer School Supplies
and Books Now Ready
LYN D ODN'S, 719 N. University Ave.
FOR
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
Guaranteed Amateur Finishing
Enlargements from your Negatives a Specialty
I have led while others followed in amateur finishing for twelve
years. Now we are still leading. We guarantee perfect results
or no charge. We give you "Peace Time Results" as we have
a plenty of Metol (which we could sell at $50.00 per lb.) and
we venture to say that no other firm is using Metol for finishing.
If you want the best results you will bring your films here.
Two dosorn from LY N D N'S 719 North
Hill Auditorium "'-'' University Avenue
Detroit
to
Put-in-Bay - Cedar Point
Cleveland - Sandusky
Daylight Across the Lake

i - t and

Lake Erie at small expense and

The New Catalogue
of the
IUlivorsity 'of Miohigall
IS NOW READY
Complete information concerning the eight Colleges and Schools:
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS, EN-
GINEERING, MEDICINE, LAW, PHARMACY,
HOMEOPATHY, DENTISTRY, GRADUATE, AND
THE SUMMER SESSION
Special Courses in Forestry, Newspaper Work, Land-
scape Design, Higher Commercial Education, including
Railway Administration and Insurance, Architecture,
Conservation Engineering, Education (affiliated with
Ann Arbor Schools for Observation Study), and a
Course for those preparing for the scientific administra-
tion of depaytments of sanitation and public health.
For Copy of Catalogue, Special Announcement, or Individual
Information, address
The Dean of the School or College in which interested, or
SHIRLEY W. SMITH
Secretary University Ann Arbor, Michigan

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan