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August 24, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1916-08-24

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THE WOLVERINE

T-
Tr

THE WOLVERINE S a
C A RDE N Straw and Fell
The official student newspaper for
he only Open-AirTheatre in Ann Arbor the University of Michigan summer
Smoking permitted session. Published by the students on
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday af-
hursday, 24-"The College widow," ternoons. Twenty-five issues. FACTORY HAT STO
A Comedy shown with1 E.Huron Near Allen
each performance Advertising rates-Furnished upon ap-
plication to the business manager.
Shows commence promptly Subscriptions and ads taken at Quar- used by their boarding house
at 7:o sod 8:30
ry's and University Avenue Phar- other land, many students
macy. blind-bluffed by the pressure
Office Hours: Managing editor, 2:00 commonplaces, that they aret
to 3:00 daily; business manager, eye for invectives of "Pros
A R C A D E 1:00 to 2:00 daily. Phone 960 or Just as there is a line betwi
2414. ary men who are primarily
Shows at 3:oo, 6:30. 8 :o, 9:3 and those who are first ofa
Address, The Wolverine, Press Build- so there is a cleavage bets
'hur., s-Wi. Nigh snd Marguerite ing, Maynard St., Ann Arbor, leaders of campus opinion
Snsow is "Isis GreatTriosoph? or"No- ___leadersofcampusopinion
torious Gallagher" (Ret) and Max American universities, on the
n.g 2s- nedV.ndEBreese. tThelFEavdlrlocal and overseas interests.
Men Do," and igman Comedy. Phone--2414 or 1283-M When the great war blazed
at., 26-Edith Storey in "The Shop
Girl" and "Trip Around the World", C. Verne Sellers-Business Manager heart of Europe, the light bro
Childrens Matinee, 4:3-'Jes of the phone-960 or 140
Mouotain Country," children 5c, into clear relief a realism w
s o study of European history or I
Tom C. Reid-Associate Editor never saw before in this
H. C. Garrison-Sports Editor With new zest the volunteer
Matian Wilson--Women's Editor tsr foreign missions and rel
)rpneum Theatre Walter Atlas-News Editor have taken up their propaga
'he Mos Tohos esP aBruce Swaney-News Editor Yet it might seem surpi
he House of Famous Plays by Famous
Players find that the ordinary discussi
Reporters in a university town hears m
htr.-Fri., 24.25-Anna Pennington and M. H. Cooley R. T. Mann
wm. Courtleigh, Jr., in "Susie SApw. ter about Germany than o
flake." Bray Comedy, George W. Corwin Frank Martin about Mexico, although scori
at., 26-Bessie Barriscate in "Sorrows M. N. Elsenau Phil Pack students nearly every
of Love." Triangle Comedy, Douglas
Fairbanks in The Mystery of the R. F. Fitzpatrick Ward Peterson
h pin ish." sleigtoryofI are enicamped along the
Leapog eso.og g5e5 i H. H. Gellert Grace Rose border.
sou-Moo., 07.05.-Patuliso Frederick i botor
"The world's Great Snare." Para- Mary Gratiot Carl Rash The present tendency seem
mount Travels. H. H. Haag Jerome Zeigler the glorious outlook of mak
BusinessStffshutoff colleges less and les:
Susissess S f cial, Certain university profe:
DETROIT UNITED LINES WM, H. Hogan Robert M. Schiller students, however, have at
tween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson. Richard Goldsmith Allan Livingston . -
ars run on astern' time, one hour faster lost their heads over dista__
local tie,. which are rather trivial in
troit Limited and Express Cars-8to a. of some local problems.
nd hurly to 7:1s p. m., s:so p. m.
lamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and great task of modern unive:
two hours to 6:48 p.m.; to Lansing, this matter seems to be a
cat Cars, Easthboud-5:35 ste., 6:4s a. o., THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1916 reasoned adjustment of lot
a. m., and every two hours to 7:OS p. m., and internationalism.
p. n., 9:05 p. a., .0:50 p. so. To Ypsi- Issue Editor-Myrtle N. Elsenau
only, 8:48 a. M. (daily except Sunday),
a. i., 12:05 p. s., 6:o5ap. tn., 11:45 P THE iAN SUFFRAGE
cat Care, Westbond-t :os a. m., 7:5o a. CONCLUSION'
and every two hours to7:50 p. Os. to:o Within a few days the men in the One hears considerable
, 12:20 a. s. the American man's treatmes
print shop at the rear of The Wol-
[ verine office will take copies of each men. He goes into acar an

It SUMMER SCHOOL
New and Second-hand
RE
, Hotel Drawing Instruments, Loose-Leaf Note Books
Student Supplies in General
. On the
are so
of local W A
the, bull's
vincials." VRIVERSITY BOKSTORE
een liter-
novelists
all poets,
ween the
in many CANDIES CANDIES
ebasis of
up in the
ought out Canoe 1 f Fountain
hich the Lunches Lunches
literature
country. for and
workers Two lce Cream
ief work
nda.PU

Repetti's

JohnsonS'

Thope's

te
a
at
Gy
g'
O1

Michigan and Fraternity Jewelry
Leather, Gold and Silver
WATCH BRACELETS
Extra Fine Repairs of Watches and Jewelry
HALLER T TFULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

TTE
ticism of
nt of wo-
d seldom

University School of Music
ALSERT A. STANLEY, Director
"A Gathering Place for Advanced Students"
Annual Summer Session
EIGHT WEEKS - JULY ;-AUG. 26
Reglar Fall Term begins Mon.,Oct. 2,1916
For Catalogueand Information address
CHARLES A. SINK, Seaortary
Ann Arbor, Micb.
[he Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
INCORPORATED 1869
OFFERS
becurity-- Service -.ocation
capital. . ..........$ 30,550.00
urplus sod Profit. .$ 875,000.00
Resources.. . ...$3,70,00.00
Main Offiee, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ-
ersity Arenae.

issue appearing this summer and bind
several files in book form. Thus in
this book the regular issue, or chap-
ter of the volume, will be an intro-
duction, entitled "Program," contain-
ing an outine of the aims of the paper,
and at the same time welcoming the
incoming summer students. Now in;
this last edition, or in the farewell
chapter of the book, appears the edi-
torial "Conclusion," which sums up
the attempts during the ┬░past !two
months, and which bids adieus to the
student body.
The better phases of University life
have continuously been advocated:
good fellowship; boosting the institu-
tion back home; emphasis on the in-,
tellectual leadership, with sufficient
space at the same time alotted to ath-
letic supremacy; appeals for supportl
of undeniably helpful endeavors like
the choral union and the movement to
raise funds for the support of absent
militiamen's suffering families; and
also numerous sermonettes. More

I,
S
4NN
0;
Of
oo
S.
o-
oc
oc
of

students than in any previous session,
have co-operated to make this summer
ARBOR-W ITMORE L.AKE sheet a success. Foreign news, city
news, interviews, and especially con-
M otor BUS tributed articles, hase all been install-
ed, and subscribers have remarked
OHEDULE JUNE 7, 1916 that The Wolverine resembles a regu-
lar newspaper and not a literary or
Monday to Friday prep school journal.
So before sinking down into its
x ABOR WHITMORE LAKE AE eternal coma of non-publication, the
D A. . 91AT M . LAKE paper bids adieu to the two thousana
3 A. H. 9:15 A. B. students and faculty men who have
P. M. 2:15 P.M. lived with it. It leaves one wish:
9:0 that a totality of effect will be left
aturday and Sunday from the collection of chapters' which
A. M. , g; I5 A.- M. will help forever to boost the best in
D P. H. 2:I5 p 1- Michigan spirit.
S5:15 -" ______
" < 9:00 " MICHIGAN ABROAD
College students sometimes have a
from Edsill's Drug Store, 20$ So. propensity of confusing the idea of
tiu Street, Ann Arbor. "university" with "universe." That is,
from Lake H ouse, Whitmore some students let their imaginations
ke, run amuck into the field of worldly
affairs, and temporarily care more
- 50 about a Russian offensive, for in-
olla Round Trip, 75o stance, than they do about typhoid
germs which are breeding in the well

rises to offer his seat to members of
the opposite sex. He is very slow in
extending to them the little courtesies
and attentions offered so freely by
most cultivated foreigners or even by
his forefathers,
The writer does not defend men's
actions. He admits that they are sub-
ject to critism. But he wonders if
there is not another side to the ques-
tion, if possibly some of the treatment
accorded women is not a direct result;
of their actions.
Who has not met right here on the
campus a group of three, four, or,
five girls none of whom made any at-
tempt to surrender even a fraction of
the walk to the ones coming in the
opposite direction? It is not an un-
common thing to face such a situation
and be forced either into bumping the
"ladies" or to step off the walk while'
they pass. Either of these is annoy-
ing, to say the least.
How many have not stepped for-
ward quickly to open one of the heavy
library doors, or to hold it for a mo-
ment, when a lady was coming, only,
to have her oblivious of your presence
and the courtesy of your act as thel
society woman in the movies is to the
butler? This is not an unusual thing
at the University of Michigan, espec-
ially in the regular school.
Recently in a Chicago depot many{
people were waiting anxiously to buy'
tickets for a train about to leave.
There was a long line waiting. Some
had stood for several minutes when a
young, very neatly-dressed, and re-
markably pretty girl came in, walked'
at once to the front of the line of ap-
proximately fifteen, and asked a fellow
if she could buy her ticket, saying she
was in a hurry. He grinned rather
foolishy and gave his assent, as she
knew he would. She bought four tick-j
ets, each of which had to be filled out;
asked several questions; and, after be-
ing there two or three minutes, went
out; got into a car and drove away.
When a man has offered to stand in
a jolting car for an hour or two that a
woman may sit, and receives no re-
cognition of appreciation from her;

and when he remembers some of the
other things he has seen, he wonders
just who is most to blame for man's
so-called rudeness and lack of courtesy
to ladies.
Contributed Poem
TO G. C. C.
OBIIT MDCCCCXVI.
My friend is dead. I loved hisn. Dead.'
He swatm forth like a Graecian god,
And sands all smiled on which he'
trod.
And then the waves gulped o'er his
head.
His hair was gold as swaying wheat.
The soul of all the bluest skies.
Sang from his happy, honest eyes.
And then the lake-weeds hugged his
feet.
As many friends as love the lark
That tunes his song with scarlet
dawn.
Were by his humor-pathos drawn.
And then the bay gulfed dark-dark.
He's drowned. Dead. And gone afar.
No more he'll shower the world with
song.
But men like him can't leave us long
Their lives each leave a deathless star.
Railroad Funds Boom
According to the Bureau of Railway
Economics the net operating income
of all the railroads of the United
States has increased 45.6% during the
seven months of the calendar year. In
a rough way this represents the gain
of all business and is a measure of our
present prosperity. Railroads are now
enjoying an abnormal condition of
operating produced. by the war. This
s no argument against increasing
rates, which need adjustment and in-
crease now just as much as before the
war when the transportation industry
was progressing toward bankruptcy.
TYPEW R ITE R$
For Sale or Rent
Hamilton Business College
State and William

POLICE CHIEF PARDON DIES
AFTER TWO WEEKS' SICKNESS
Frank Pardon, for the past two yeas
head of the Ann Arbor police depart-
ment, died yesterday morning at his
home on Ann street after an illness of
two weeks. Mr. Pardon was the most
efficient police chief the city has boast-
ed in years and his place will bea hard a
one to fill. He was a prominent mem-
ber of several fraternal orders and
leaves many friends. Funeral services
will be held at the residence Friday
afternon at 3 o'clock, Rev. A. L. Nick-
las officiating.
The Coolest
Dining Place
in Town is the
-easily reached by north or
south elevators; open from
eight in the morning till five
in the afternoon.
The service is high grade,
and all menus are prepared
by a chef who was for a
number of years employed by
one of the leading New York
clubs.
Noon Luncheon, 50c
Regular Service
a la carte

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