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August 21, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1913-08-21

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AT YOUR DOOR THREE THE ONLY OFFICIAL
EVENINGS A WEEK, 75 SUMMER PUBLICATION

Vol IV.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THIiRSDAY, AUGUlIST 21, 1911.

No. 25.

No. 21.

FINAL ENROLLMENT
SHOWS LARGE GAIN
Michigan Has More Regular Student
At Summer Session Than Any
Otlher Unaiversity.
ONLY 369 OF THESE ARE WOMEN
The final figures just issued by Prof
E. H. Kraus at the administrative offi
ces of the summer session, show
gain of 96 in the enrollment of thi
year over that of last. The enroll-
ment by departments is as follows:
Lit .........................641
Engineering .................... 299
Medical...................... 13
Law ........................... 196
Pharmacy ... . ...............15
Graduate ...................... 180
Library Methods ................ 23
Biological Station ............... 29
Total ........................1515
Duplicates .................... 95
Net total .....................1420
An interesting fact is that of this
total only 369 are women, which is
scarcely more than half of the regis-
tration in the literary department
alone.
Since the institution of the first
summer session in 1894 more and more
students have taken advantage each
year of the opportunity offered to
shorten their regular course by com-
ing to summer school, as the follow-
ing figures witness:
Previous Summer Sessions.
No ;b
1894 ......................... 91
1895 ... . .. . . . 187
1896- ... . .- ... ....224
1897 -...... . ............... 225
1898 ......................... 235
-899 ... . ..- ..- ... .......... . 263
19.0 .1......-.8......-..-.... 404
1901 ..-......................... 416
1902 .......-...-.-. ... 462
1903 ......................... 524
1904-....- - ............... 551
1905 ............................ 813
1906 ..-... .......... ....1034
1907 ........ ...................1070
1908 .....................'......1085
1909 .................. ..... 1225
1910 ...- .................... .1226
(Continued on page 4)
ISSUE LICENSE TO LOCAL
WIRELESS TELEGRAPH PLANT
Station is Assigned Wave Length and
Will Take Commercial
Mfessages.
Michigan's wireless station has re-
cently been registered with the Bu-
reau of Navigation, Department of
Commerce, and a license has been re-
ceived regulating the station in vari-
ous ways and granting it certain priv-
ileges as an experimental station, not
granted to-establishments of the com-
mercial or amateur classes. The li-
censing of the local station is a part
of the world-wide movement, to regu-
late and control the numerous stations
which have sprung up in all quarters,
in order to procure the greatest ben-
efit to the general public and to mini-
mize as much as possible the interfer-
ence of minor stations with the im-
portant nautical and commercial in-
telligence now transmitted by wireless.
This interference is done away with
by assigning to the stations of each
particular class a definite wave length ,
with which to work. A wave of a par-
ticular length will be picked up only
by a station tuned to receive that

length, and will not interfere with sta-
tions of another wave length. A wave
length of 450 meters has been assign-
ed the Michigan station. Being an ex-
perimental station the local office will
(Continued on page 4)

MICHIGAN UNION OPERA WOKE
PROGRESSES DUR'ING SUMMtIER
Author Puts on nshing Toehe
While Music and Lyric lien
Cooperate.
Summer vacation has not put a sto
to work on the Union opera for nex
year. W. R. Melton has been busy i
i Detroit revising the manuscript an
polishing up certain passages wit]
, which be was not entirely satisfied
- Though one is in Holland, Michigan
a and the other in Washington, D. C.
s Willis A. Diekema and Sylvan S. Gros
- ner have been working together o
some new song hits, the former writ
ing the music and the latter the lyrics
g Melton has decided not to go to Kan-
2 sas to teach next fall as he had plan
ned, but has secured a position in De-
troit and will be able to come to Ant
Arbor and help to get the Opera intt
shape when he is needed.
In the judgment of the committe
which selected the opera, the one chos-
en was clearly the best of a large
number submitted, and is in some rec
spects an improvement over any tha
have thus far been given.
OPEN HOUSE DAY
PROVES BIG SUCCESS
Increased Circulation Witnesses
Amazing Progress of the
"Black Fly."
CAMP DAVIS CLOSES THIS WEEK.
"Open House Day," Saturday, Au-
gust 16, at Camp Davis proved a most
successful affair. It had been widely
advertised and nearly two hundred
people, resorters chiefly from nearby
Mullet Lake and Burt Lake summer
colonies spent the day in camp.
Everything "took" well, the report
has it, from the exhibition of regular
camp work in the morning to the"Good
Night Ladies" at 5:00 p. m.
The program:
9:00-10:00-Regular Camp Work.
11:00-Roll Call.
11:05-Laying Corner Stone at the
new Storehouse. Speeches by Prof.
Johnston and "Les." Keliher
11:45-Aquatic Sports and Foot
Races.
1:00-Buffet LunchMess tent.
2:30--Hall Game, Camp Champions
vs. "All-Stars.
3:30-4:30-Dance. Music by Camp
Orchestra.
4:30-Camp Sing Around Fire.
5:00--Good Night Ladies."
The camp league pennants, one for
each man on the winning team, were
awarded to members of Party "4." The
current number of the "Black Fly"car-
ries a two-column cut of the victors
and their spoils.
Waxing reminiscent the "Black Fly"
tells its readers of the progress it has
made since "Jinks" Otto, "Nig" Kuhn,
"Mort" Hunter, and "Mac" McGee put
it-through its swaddling-clothes days.
Only in its second volume, it has in-
creased its circulation some 3433.333
per cent over last year's total. In
1912 but 15 copies were printed while
this year 530 more of the blue sheets
have been issued. So efficient did the
office force become'that a paper a min-
ute was printed. Next year a special
office is to be given the staff, and if
"Raselues' plans materialize they arc
going to have "some" paper.
The work of the summer camps will
come to an end Friday, August 221
To date not a day has been lost on ac-
count of bad weather, setting a new

record for the camps.
Make Use of Many Fire Extinguishers.
There are 185 fire extinguishers dis-
tributed in the varioss University
buildings.

ROWE APPOINTED IFOREIGN STUDENTS
GENERAL COACH pp eCls" ssrsA-siued io TO GIVE LECTURES
_ ~ Prospecel e1{reshnten Before
School Opens.
To Have Chlrge of AIlMMilor Sports, _ -(I1der Ispiccs Un1iiversity Extension
('arrying o nWok Started Work has been carried on all sum- Bureau Partial Program
bcy Isa~tg-his mer by the senior lit committee on Is iAoiicwd.
freshman advisors. Before the end of
NEW FEL, O E 'T'US E TE 1BUILT. last semester, such members of the A('ULTY LE TU'IiES CON''INI'E.
junior class as were interested in the
To carry out its policy of interesting work left their names with a commit- In the next bulletin published by
every student in the university in ath- tee consisting ofcKarl I. Hoch, Ren- the university extension bureau and
letics, the Athletic Association has ap- ville Wheat and James E. ond. f sent ,out sto variostowns throughout
pointed Floyd A. Rowe, '09E. director This committee has been in com- the state it is planned to include a
of general athletic activities. Simus- munication with the registrar and list of talks by members of the Cos-
taneously with this appointment, the dean of the literary department, and mopolitan club. These talks by for-
ground has been broken for a new such freshmen as have signified their eeign students will not be a part of the
locker house at Ferry fielsd capable of intention of cossing to the university regular extension lecture course in-
accommodating 450 men. have immediately been assigned to asmuch as no part of the cost will be
This field house will be a frame senior advisors. Indications are that paid by the university. Aside from
structure 85 by 20 feet in size. It will several hundred men will be assigned the fact that the towns desiring such
in this way before the opening of the lectures will have to pay the entire
nsext session. expenses, they will be under the aus-
As in the past, this work will only pices of the lecture bureau, and it is
supplement, and will not supplant the hoped that they will be successful
work of the faculty advisors. The plan enough so that they may be made a
was entirely successful last year, and permanent feature.
the work this year will involve very The program so far as arranged is
few changes. as follows:

Floyd . Rowe.
contain two cold showers, and 226
lockers. The lockers will be open
wcoden ones, which will be placed
along both walls and down the center
of the house. They will be built to
accommodate the clothes of two per-
sons each, and will be free to all stu-
(Continued on page 4)
MANAGER-MAGNATE
SAYS SELECTIONS
CAN CLAIM CLASS
In his double capacityas president
of the summer school baseball league,
and manager of the law baseball team,
Francis S. Rosentlhal has selected a
first and second team from the sum-
mer session league, which he herewith

UNION COMMENCES
ACTIVE CAMPAIGN
Iliram Cody Homer Heath and Edward
Ketup Appointed ' 'Take
Charge of Work.
WIll ('01MENCE IIIME)DIAT'EILY.
At a recent meeting of the commit-
tee in charge of the campaign for
funds for the Michigan Union, Hiarm
S. ody, '08, Homer H eath, '07, and Ed-
ward Kemp, '12-'14L, were selected to
take personal charge of the work of
preparing the ground for the final
campaign.
These men will each be assigned to
a differenst section of the country, and
will go to all the important alumni
centers, with a view to ascertaining the
amount of financial support which the
Union can expect in each section, and
the plan of campaign which would be
advisable in each instance.
This work will begin immediately,
and when it has been completed, the
committee expects to begin at once on
the final campaign for funds. Thus
far the work has consisted chiefly in
educating the alumni as to the need
for a Union clubhouse, and in ex-
plaining the possibilities of the mil-
lion dollar project.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
PLANS EXCELLENT PltOGAt1.'.
Arrangements Delayed By Negotiations
With iJustice Hmghles, of U. S.
Supreme Court.
As yet the plans of the Oratorical
Association for next year have not
been fully worked out, but the officers
hope to arrange a program which will
include speeches by a number of
world-famous men. Up to this time
arrangements have been retarded by
the fact that Justice Hughes, of the
U'nited States Supreme Court, who was
to have delivered the first address,
was unable to give a definite answer.
He was finally forced to notify the
committee that the press of business
would prevent him from making the
trip to Ann Arbor.
Besides the regular Varsity con-
tests, Prof. R. D. T. Hollister is to give
a recital. Professor Fulton, who has
collaborated with Professor Trueblood
on a number of books, will also be on
the program. The Oratorical associa-
tion play has not yet been selected,
but an attemept cilii he made to stage
something more elaborate -than any-.
tlsiisg that has yet been produced.

C. P. Wang---"Why the Foreign Stu-
dents Come to America."
W. P. Cheng-"Political Relations
Beteween Chin asnd the United States."
A. A. Scheerer "'olitical Cosdition
in the Philippine Islands, and the
Question of Independence."
Juan Bonilla-"South America." Il-
lustrated lecture.
W. W. Welsh-"How We Are Cosmo-
politan."
V. P. Maw and Y. F. Yabin Hsu-
"China."
Lectures by faculty men will be of
the same nature as those given last
year, though the indications are that
there will be a greater demand for
them. As in the past, only a very small
proportion of these lectures will be
read from manuscript. In each town
in which the lectures are, given there
is a local committee which reports to
the central committee at Ann Arbor.
In this report is embodied the judg-
ment of the local committee as to
whether or not the talk went over the
heads of the aundience, and in what
respects it might be improved. This
opinion is brought to the notice of the
lecturer, and in this way it is hoped to
eliminate any features of the work
which are open to criticism.
SHAKESPEAREAN RECITAL
PROVES GREAT SUCCESS
"ttc, AdoA bout Nothing" Receives
Great Applause From
Large Audience.
With a cast that might have done
credit to any metropolitan play, Prof.
Thomas C.Trueblood's class in Shakes-
pearean reading gave its second recital
of Much Ado About Nothing in Sarah
Caswell Angell Hall last evening be-
fore a capacity audience.
In spite of the change of cast in ev-
ery scene and the length of the play,
which lasted two and one-half hours,
the audience was kept constantly in-
terested.
The success of the play is doubtless
due to the keen enthusiasm and talent
of the class and its perfect team work,
though much must be accredited to
Louis Eich, graduate, who has been
starring in all the recent Shakespear-
ean plays, Edward Moseman, '14, who
has been playing initial roles in the
Union operas, "The Prosenium," and
other plays, and Jabin Hsu.
The opening scene . in Leonato's
house, struck the keynote of the play.
The acting of Louis Eich as Leonato,
Moseman as Claudio, Hsu as Don Pe-
dro, Claude Swift as Benedick, and
Miss :Lena J. Kraku as Beatrice being
especially noteworthy.
In ihe arbor scene, when the aged
"(Continued on page 4)

submits:
First'Ieam
Barringer
Webber
Price
Pontius
Bauman
Labadie
Hyames
Seward
Corey
Carter
G. Smith.
lctFie

Position Second 'eam

Pitcher
Pitcher
Pitcher
Catcher
1 Base
2 Base,
3 Base
Shortstop
It. Field
L. Field
C. Field
Utility

Nelson
Nichol
Arnold
McFarlin
Clay
Wanner
Kervin
Collette
B. Smith
Metcalf
Hlarrington
O'Conner

To the Editor of The Wolverine:-
Being duly appreciative of the fact
(Continued on page 4)
THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor.
Increasing cloudiness, and warmer.
Possible showers today or Friday
Yesterday's Temperatures.
Maximum 92; minimum 68. Wind
velocity 24. Precipitations .1.
{Osse yessr en oomxiImums 0: smi-
Mum 62. I'recipitation. 1

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