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June 26, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1912-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

75th Anniversary Souvenir Edition

;sues Wednesday
hursday Mornings

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Daily

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1. XXII, EXTRA.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1912.

.._._ .
i

IL NATIONS

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ACADEMIC PROCE
8:30 A. M.

SSION

MAKE UNION
SHOW A HI T
S EVERLASTING," A TALE OF
E PERPETUAL WIDOW, SCOR-
THE SUCCESS OF THE AFTER.
ON; MUSICAL ACTS GREAT.
X"AND"FREDDIE" BACK

olitan Club Entertains
Jiii Jitsu, Fencing and
Magic.

With

Before an audience which packed to
e limit of its capacity the big tent
medic green Tuesday's entertain-'
ent presented by the Michigan Union
et with the unqualified approval of
th ,visitors and hosts. Five thousand
ople were comfortably accommodat-
beneath the mammoth canvas and
e events went off without a hitch.
When the curtain call was sounded
ox" Bogle took the stand and bark-
for the performance. The big lad;
the quaint costume of his Sphinx
n made a ready get-away with that
omparable "Spread eagle" of which
is a past master. The audience
s then confronted with "Blind Bill"
iliams who entertained with a little
itation blown from a mouth organ to
guitar accompaniment. The mem-
rs of the Cosmopolitan club present-r
a curious act which the official pro-j
am book called an "Oriental Me-
ge." A performance in the art of
jitsu by Kanata and Kobayashi
ling in an injury for the latter when
was thrown from the small mat
.t was provided for their turn. The
aibition was followed by some
ight of hand work by Premananda
s in which the clever Hindu kept
audience guessing. McCormick
3 Das, and Toncuchi and Yamada
sented a speedy exhibition or ex-
t fencing and baton fighting.
Freddie" Lawton, '11, was there
h the old delivery of some snappy
tch comedy hits and songs. His
m mate, "Eddie" Howell, '13 E, was
a "distanced second" in piano play-
especialy when, he pulled off his
t, and making a short neck stand,n
,ered the keys while upside down.
'he big laurels of the day went to
boys who put on "Miss Everlast-
," a comedy skit written by Fran-
Riordan and Robert Beck, with lyr-
by Julius Wuerthner and Selden
kinson. With the support of "Fat"'
znett, '11, the comedians did not let
moss grow under their toes. It isI
e to say they would have gottent
college widow, alias Newton Fox,
rried off, if said person had not per-
ed in smoking on State Street af-
the show before she removed her.
eeds."'
'he work of the Musical Club mem-
s was of creditable order, and re-
red enthusiastic demonstrations ofl
i'oval.
OIF. ELLIS WILL READ A
CANADIAN BRIDGE COMPANYf
rof. Charles A. Ellis, who has just
gned from the civil engineering
artment, has been appointed chiefE
igning engineer of the DominionE
Ige Co., with headquarters at Mon-(
.1. The Dominion Bridge Co. which,c
:onjunction with the Canadiana
dge Co., is to build the new Quebeca
[ge, employs about 125 draftsmenf
25 designing engineers, all ofc
>m are to be under- Prof. Ellis. I

Parade Divisions.
Graduating classes-l. Dental;
2. Homeopathic; 3. Pharma-
ceutical; 4. Law; 5. Medical;
6. Engineer; 7. Literary; 8.
Alumni; 9. Guard of Honor
Section.
Fair Weather Schedule.
Divisions Meet
1. South end of Chemistry Bldg.,
west walk.
2. South end old Homeopathic,
west walk.
3. South end Chemistry Bldg.,
east walk.
4. Rear of Law Bldg., diagonal
walk.
5. West side of Medical Bldg.
6. Engineering court.
7. Between Tappan Hall and
Museum.
8. In front of Memorial Hall.
9. In University Hall.
Changes in Case of Rain.
1, 2, and 3 Faculty room Medic
Bldg.
4. South corridor, Medic Bldg.
5. West corridor, Medic Bldg.
6. West ocrridor, Chemistry
Bldg., room 161.
7. East corridor, Chemistry
Bldg., room 165.
8. Memorial Hall.
9. University Hall.
Only a downpour without
prospect of clearing will be con-
sidered a rain.

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Michigan's gymnasia were trans-
formed last night into a gay scene of
rhythmically swaying forms, set off

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SENIOR RECEPTION,
BRILLIANT AFFAIR
Music 'ritten for Occasion; Extensive
Decorations and Programs
Featuro Dciuce.

SOCIETIES PARADE
IN GAUDY ATTIRE
Costumed honorary Societies Mike
Fine Showing; Saered "Bull"
Amuses Trong.

NOTABLES IN RECEIVING LINE. GREAT CROWD SEES BIG EVENT.

'02 POSTS LIVID1
PROCLAMATIONS
Old Boys Forget Lapse of Years and
Frolic Through the Weird
Hours of Night
CLASS BELONGS TO HEROIC AGE.
With a proclamation couched in the
verbose and presumptuous terms of
the fresh-soph posters of fragrant
momory, the illustrious class of 1902
issued a defi to the classes who grad-
uated 'under less fortunate nu-
merals, to meet them under
Tappan Oak at 2:45 this morn-
ing to give themselves with wan-
ton abandon to a career of vandalism'
and devastation. Whether this quaint
and classic town will be a mass of
smouldering ashes when the sun sets
this afternoon or whether merely bro-
ken fences and brilliantly bedaubed
portals will mark their course, it is yet
too early to forecast.
At an early hour this morning the
members of this notable class were
awaiting the appointed hour in an
upper room, from which they were;
making the night hideous with their
preparations for the battle. Even one
of Ann Arbor's regular cops, not one;
of the "over-night" camups kind, trem-
bled as he heard the thunderous dem-
onstrations on a near-by corner. It is
impossible to say what ends will satis-
fy the indomitable spirit and un-
quenchable ardor of this heroic class.
Earl C. Weightman, Verne Tickner,
and' Ethel A. Heath, graduates of the
actuarial course in insurance, have re-
ceived appointments with Michigan
companies. ' Wightman will be actu-
ary for the Michigan State Life Insur-
ance Company, of Detroit, Tickner,
for the Northern Insurance Company,
of Detroit, and Miss Heath, for the
Lady Maccabees of Port Huron.

by a bacliground of lights, yellow and
blue bunting, and flags, the brilliant
setting of the 1912 senior reception.
After months of preparation during
which the committees, headed by Wil-
liam C. McCormick, had worked the
plans to the last detail, the reception
of the Jubilee year was conceded to be
positively the "best ever."
The guests were welcomed from
8:30 to 9:00 by a "receiving line" in
which stood President and Mrs. Hutch-
ins, Dr. Angell, Regent and Mrs. Beal,
and, with their wives, the deans of
all the departments, Professors R. M.
Wenley, H. C. Adams, and M. P. Til-
ley, Mr. Philip Bartelme, and Mrs. F.P.
Jordan. Different heads of the senior
committees took places in the line to
make introductions. Besides General
Chairman McCormick, the other gen-
eral officers for the reception were,
Jervis Webb, secretary, Hugh S. Gam-
ble, treasurer, and Homer Ramsdell,
auditor.
Not only seniors but alumni and un-
dergraduates were welcomed at the af-
fair but only 107 couples were among
the dancers. All the visiting dele-
gates were presented with tickets
which admitted either to the gallery or
to the fl rs of the gym. A deficit re-
sulted because of the small1attendance
at the party.
Decorations for the affair were elab-
orate and rivalled the -hop in splen-
dor. Festoons in the varsity's colors
draped the balconies and concealed
the unsightly roof trusses, and from
the ceiling were suspended five drops,
on which were displayed "Old Glory"
and the flags of different colleges.
Michigan state seals were fastened at
both ends of the hall, and along the
sides of the balconies appeared in elec-
tric lights, "1912" and "Michigan." The
flags to be carried in the academic'
parade by the "Guard of Honor" were
also included in the decorating scheme.
Fischer's Kalamazoo orchestra
struck up at nine o'clock, and played
through the entire program of 22
whirls. "Our Diamond Jubilee," a
new tune by Mr. Fischer himself, was
the musicians' headliner. Two"catchy"
compositions, yet unpublished, by stu-
dent composers, were also featured,
"The Jubilee Rag," by Frank Picard
and Andrew Kelyn, and "The Girl of
My Smoke Wreaths," by Picard and
Julius Wuerthner, of "The Awakened
Rameses" fame. Last night was the
first time that the entire improved cui-
sine of Barbour gymnasium has been
at the disposal of any class function
and a plentiful supper was served.
Programs were in the official colors
of the university, the leather a deep
azure, bound by a maize cord. A dif-
ficulty was encountered in having a
sufficient supply. The printed filler
sent by the manufacturing firm at
Philadelphia was incorrect in places,
and as it was too late to have them
correct it, fillers were printed in De-
troit and the cases shipped in there
yesterday to be completed. Persons
who received no programs may give
their names to a memberof the recep-
tion committees and programs will be
mailed.

Adorned with war paint, barn paint;
and powder, and dressed respectively
in every color of the rainbow, with a'
few extra shades thrown in, eleven
campus societies "pi-raded" around
the campus yesterday afternoon. The
procession formed between the engi-
neering arch and the flag pole and
started along the diagonal walk short-
ly before three o'clock.
One minute was allowed each soci-
ety in which to give some "stunt" be-
fore the reviewing stand on the steps
of Memorial hall. Most of the organi-
zations devoted their alloted time to
singing distinctive- songs and chants,
the members assuming various chars
acteristic poses during the perform-
ance.
One of the most striking features et-
the parade was the Sphinx sacred bull,
in the disguise of an ordinary milch
cow with the cognomen "Sadie." The
young lady proved a bit intractable at
times, but fortunately kept her bux-
som self on good behavior at the crit-
ical moment before the reviewing
stand.
Fully five thousand people, includ-
ing alumni, students and townspeople,
lined the walks of the campus to view
the parade, the crowd moving toward
the pavilion after the procession had
passed.
Following is the list of the organi-
zations represented in yesterday's pa-
rade: Michigamua, Vulcans, Druids,
Barristers, Sphinx, Triangles, Griffins,
Foresters, Chinese club, Cosmopolitan
club, Wolverine staff.

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8:15 A. M. Bugle Call. Ceremo-
ny of hoisting the Flag.
8:30 A. M. Academic Procession
Forms.
9:00 A. M. Procession Strts.
10:00 A. M. Commemoration Ex-
ercises.
Address by the Hon. Lawrence
Maxwell, '74, LL.D '04.
1:00 P. M. Alumni Luncheon.
1:00 P. M. President's Luncheon.
2:15 P. M. BandConcert.
2:30 P. M. Annual Meeting of
the Alumni Association.
3:30 P. M. Procession of Alumni
to Ferry Field.
4:00 P. M. Ball Game.
4:00-6:00 P. M. Reception by
Dean and Mrs. Vaughan to the
Senior Medics and Friends.
6:00-8:00 P. M. Class Dinners.
8:00 P.M. Senior Promenadeand
Band Concert.
9:00 P. M. Senate Reception.

PROGRA3F FOR THE DAY.

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G

Hon. Lawren
'04, will deli V
Day address i:
o'clock this m
has been since
turer on Legal
ty and is at the
of Law at the 1
Before the add

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GENERAL ALUMNI CATALOGUE.

ON SALE IN UNIVERSITY HALL. march to the tei
Chief Marshall

The new general catalogue of alum-
ni of the university, compiled under
the direction of Prof. I. N. Demmon, is
just off the press and is now on sale
in the main corridor of University hall.
It lists 43,666 names, including those
of all graduates of 1911, and all non-
graduates through 1906. The price is
$2.00.
MICHIGAN OUT TO
WIN' FINAL CLASH

Last Game for 1912 Nine Will
Many Changes in Lineup
of Team.

CO

UNII

HON. LAWRE
OF CINCINN
DRESS IN P-1
EY MANAGE;
WILL H0IS1
Many Notables
Parade, I

See

ENGINEERS AND LITS HOLD
THEIR CLASS DAY EXERCISES
. The lit and engineer graduating
classes held their class day exercises
yesterday morning. Werner Allison,
president of the 1912 literary class,
gave a talk from the band stand, Ha-
zel Wolcott read the class history,
George Spaulding the class poem, El-
len Moore the prophecy and Reginald
Collins the oration. .
The engineer exercises were held in
the engineering court. Dean Cooley
and Francis Letchfield, president of
the class, gave addresses. The class
history was told by Clarence Hannon.
Joseph Hudnut read the poem, Harry
Brown the prophecy, and Ira Hook
delivered the oration.
HIS LIFE EPOCHS COINCIDE
WITH THOSE OF UNIVERSITY
Facts and figures in no other man's
life dove-tail in so neatly with the
Commemoration Week as do those in
the life of James H. Cogshall, '62, for
many years a County School Examin-
er of Muskegon County. Mr. Cogshall,
who returned for the festivities yes-
terday morning, was born in the year
which marks the birth of this state
and this institution, 1837. He gradu-
ated in the quarter century class of
sixty-two, and; to cap the succession
of chronological climaxes, hopes to
celebrate his golden wedding anniver-
sary this fall.
Active and loquacious, this *rar-
time grad recounts many stirring tales
of the times when the men left class
rooms to engage in the struggle of the
sixties.

LAVANS MAY START AS PITCHER.
With one more game to play and
one more team to face on Ferry field
this season it is not deemed too late
by Coach Rickey to effect a more or
less serious shaking up in the Wolver-
ine lineup for today's contest with
Penn.
After witnessing the weird termi-
nation of Monday's struggle, the advis-w
ability of this move is very apparent,
and it is hoped to make today's game
a continuation of the interesting con-
test which was being played up to the
sixth inning on that fateful afternoon.
To that end it is very probable that
the Quaker stickers will have to face
Michigan's erstwhile shortstop, La-
vans, at Rickey's request and if he
proves to be as-good in the box as he
has shown himself to be in covering
third the Pennseyites will have their
the territory between second and
troubles. Baribeau will probably be
held as the relief slab artist in this
event and Scully will be put in to take
care of Lavans position at short.
With this change on the scorecards
it is hoped to get revenge on the East-
erners and its sweetness will be
measured, by the size of the score,
with Michigan on the big end and the
sons of Penn begging for mercy.
A victory today, the last one to be
gained on Ferry field diamond by the
team of 1912, would be a fitting termi-
nation of the season, in keeping with
the joyous events of jubilee week and
something that would do more to
warm the hearts of the returned grads
than anything else.

ercises will be open
at 8:15. The 26th I
play the Star Spang
the American flag is
and "broken out."
this, the nine divisi
sion will assemble a
posts for formation
tions from their ma:
Formations for thl
and Commencement
be similar. The pr
will be that this mo
will lead and the se
rear and on Thursd
be reversed. The pz
by the Infantry band
corps will march b
ions of the Alumni
Honor Section, and
Grads and the Near
sity Band will be the
rade.
Prof. C. S. Denis
Honor Section with
two color bearers im
ing. This section wi
President H. B. Hu
rence Maxwell, orat
JJames B. Angell, Ai
D. White, the Regent
Delegates, Candidate
grees, especially in
the Senate of the uni
dred seniors have i
Guard of Honor to
fifty will march on
banners of their dep
At the Spanish mo
the colors. When th
umn of Alumni rear
will halt, open ranks
through which the
Section will pass. A
tion is seated the A
termarch from the
column, half going
trance and half to th
mainder of the pro
march to their sea
from the marshals.
Engagement of Ye
The engagement
Jones, '10, and Walte
'12 L, managing edi
gan Daily for the y
announced Thursday
The class of 1911
turn to the univer:
indulging in one of t
dances which are fa
tions in Barbour gyn

MEMO

Today:

BASE BALL. FERRY FIELD 4:00 P. M.

Grand Stand, Reserved Seats, 75c.

Bleachers, Reserved Seats, 50c.

TS ON SALE At Athletic Association Office Until 2:30 P. M.

FERRY" FIELD GATES C

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