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June 25, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1912-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1912.
Ar ALL CAN TELL'EM.

TOWN

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The Michigan Daily offers
three colored Souvenir Anniver-
sary issues during Commemora-
tion week. This is the first is-
sue. The second will appear on
Wednesday morning and the
third on Thursday morning.
They can be purchased on the
street or at News stands, book'
stores, and drug stores.

u
s
s

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we Class Day Material Must be in Early.
lay of Class presidents are requested to
ly a have all class day material in the
o the hands of W. B. Shaw in Memorial hall
as soon as possible after the close of
morn- the exercises in order to insure pub-
,iers. lication in the commencement number
L late of the Alumnus.
d that__________
hence
,norn-.
epMVARIED GAME
elimi-
d the
on in CAPTURED BY
,e . re--

The old boys tell some pretty good
ones. Seated comfortably on the Un-
ion porch, the students of the earlier
days spin yarns that put the under-
grad to blush. And that's where J. H.
Flagg, '72, of Chicago, comes in strong.
"Humph," and he chuckles as he
glances over his 1912 model clothes,
"I had five dollars to my name when
I signified my intention of earning a
sheepskin. But I was steward of a
boarding club," and again he chuckled
reminiscently, "and-er my knowledge
of the surrounding orch'ards and tur-
key roosts stood me in good stead. We
didn't have a Joe's to rave abput, in
those days, but it was Hank's place
then. Hank used to run a confection-
ary store, cafe, dance hall and board-
ing house-all in the same building.
That was some place-but, er--where
is that man Joe located?"
John Richards, of Flint, is the oldest
Michigan grad on the ground at pres-
ent. He is from the class of '57, and
no one is prouder to cheer for the uni-
versity than the linguist of 81 years.
He recounts many tales of the early
happenings, all tinged with a remark-
able youthfulness of expression.
"When I was a medical student,"
said Dr. Henry Boss, '87, of Holland,
"we used to hold our class rushes in
the building itself. One time aftel a'
hearty battle had been waged about
the ears of one hotly enraged contest-
ant, we were chagrined to discover
that the bedraggled figure was that of
a Professor Sewell. And our postof-
fice riot rivalled the Star theater inci-
dent of some years ago. Oh we were
wild ones all right."
,52's Pathetic Tale.
Rendered doubly sad in sharp relief
against the gayety of Celebration

class in the university.
All year Judge Alfred Otis, Atchison,
Kan., and Rev. Belville Porter, Nor-
ristown, Pa., had been corresponding,
in eager anticipation of another reun-
ion of the famous class of '52. Plans
were laid, and preparations were un-
der way. Then Porter, alarmed at the
faat that several of his recent letters
to Otis had been unanswered, wrote to
the local alumni association for infor-
mation regarding his old classmate.
The reply came back that Judge Por-
ter had died on May 6.
So a vacant chair in the "Class of '52
Headquarters"betokens the sad break.
ing up of the reunion, but as the dying
wish of Porter's comrade of former
years bade him attend the Anniver-
sary Celebration, the coming -of the
oldest graduate is eagerly awaited.
'it Was the Hottest Rush, Sir."
But they all disagree on one point,'

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"I want the alumni to know
that we welcome them back to
their old Alma Mater" said Dr.
Angell, yesterday. We are doing
everything we can," he contin-
ued, "to make them feel at
home."
President H. B. Hutchins said
that a chance to speak to an un-
dergraduate in Memorial hall
yesterday, was out of the ordi-
nary. He expressed his appreci-
ation at being able to welcome
so many graduates back for
Commencement.

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ALMA M
PR

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Vi
* dE
t in

HATER W!"J COMES
ODIGAL SONS.

Anniv

.all lay claim to "the hottesti
that was ever fought uponi
pus." One of the old guard1
twenty broken arms, due tot
tions of his classmates.
fings down the gauntlet with
lenge that they barred him

rush, sir,
the cam-
boasts of
the exer-
Another
the chal-
in order

* except
* will ad
* hall. i
enginee
* given iz

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PROF, K. GUTHE

QUAKER NINE

to give his opponents a fair chance
Even the good Bishop Burch, '75, tells
of the massacre of '74, in which the
contestants fought until aides from
other classes rushed to the affray, to
bring sound clothing for the battlers.
Scenes of rushes have shifted from
the stairways of the buildings and the
classrooms, to medic green, the law
building front, and after the street
rushes, to Ferry field. Nor were the
rushes either confined to any definite!
period, or ruled by limitations and re-
strictions. Everything but sledge ham-
mers or bolo knives were fair. And
at that, the days-of-yore grads are a
healthy looking body, aren't they.?

.1;

The

TREATED'
FORMANCE

I$ APPOINTED

1:-

TO A
IN
E ON

The

-1- --
in the
Jipe imi
e and
of in

was

as nas ever oeen pre-
cal lot. That was the
diculous followed and
running about and fre-
notable among which
of one Harry Corbin,
he hidden ball trick
d and worked with
but without any mer-
phisticated who slum-
on valley. About the
nance of a wierd af-
t of one Schuyler who
bitrate the difficulties

e seti

neath a clear sky, the play enjoye'
unusual advantage. The onlooker
transported to the real Atbens of n
centuries past.
The playing of Alcestis, by M
Bonner, approached the professic
as did the Admetos of Josephine D;
It was difficult for them as for
others to get their lines over the al
ence on account of no restrictio:
space but that fault was inevit

DECORATE CAMPUS
FOR OLD GRADS,
To the old grad coming back for the
first time in many years, the campus
presents a far different appearance
with its many decorations than it does
ordinarily. For the past few days
a large force of workmen have been
engaged in transforming it into forty
acres of festive beauty.
A long row' of arches and poles, top-
ped with various colored pennants,
leads up to University hall. Above the
entrance to this building, in the midst
of maize and blue bunting is a blue
electric sign "Salvete"--Welcome-
standing out where all may realize the
spirit of hospitality extended to the
many visitors. The dome is outlined
with hundreds of incandescent lights
which make a fine appearance when
viewed from a distance. The towers
of the library are also wreathed with
lights.
Ropes on which are hung many dif-
ferent flags and pennants have been
stretched from the flag pole in front
of the library in different directions
and make this one of the beauty spots
of the campus.
However the work has not been con-
fined to university class circles alone.
Many of the merchants have displayed
the maize and blue colors in honor of
he Celebration, and have enlivened
he appearance of the business section.

GRADUATE DEAN
REGENTS ACCEPT PROF. G. L.
CLARK'S RESIGNATION AND ADD
TWO NEW MEN TO FACULTY OF
LAW DEPARTMENT.
Old "Cat.Hole" is Selected as the Site
of the New Power
Plant.
Prof. Karl E. Guthe, present head of
the physics department in the absence
of Dean J. O. Reed of the literary de-
partment, was appointed first dean of
the graduate school at the regular
June meting of the Regents last night.
Prof. Guthe's appointment will take
effect October 1.
Provisionbwas made for an execu-
tive council to be composed of seven
members of the faculty of the univer-
sity, including President H. B. Hutch-
ins, but as yet Dean Guthe is the only
other member selected.
The resignation of Prof. G. L. Clark,
of the law department, was accepted,
and two new members were added to
the law faculty. They are, Mr. John
B. Waite, a practicing attorney in
Toledo, who was made a professor of
law, and Mr. Willard T. Barbour, '05-
'08 L, of Ypsilanti, who was made as-
sistant professor of law. Mr. Waite is
a son of Judge Richard Waite of Tole-
do, and a relative of' Chief Justice M.
R. Waite of the U. S. SSupreme Court.
Mr. Barbour won the Rhode Scholar-
ship at Oxford in 1908.
Mr. P. S. Lovejoy of Olympia, Wash-
ington, was made assistant professor
of forestry.
The old "Cat-Hole" back of the den-
tal building was selected as the site
for the new power plant.
University Views on Exhibition.
A collection consisting of pictures
and other material illustrating the his-
tory of the university since its foun-
dation is on 'exhibition in the east hall
of the general library. The collection
will be open to inspection during Com-
mencement Week.

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