100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 06, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1912-07-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

At Your Door Three Fifteen Hundred Sum-
Evenings a Week, 75c j mer Session Student
VOL. IIL ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 6. No. 5

FORMER NUMBERS
ARE SURPASSED
Present Summer Enrollment, 1269,
Bests 1910 Record
of 1235.
NET TOTAL OF 1300 EXPECTED.
Official count last night gave the
present number of students in the
Summer Session as 1269, or 135 more
than the entire net enrollment of the
1911 session and 34 more than attend-
ed in 1910 which heretofore has held
the high-water mark of summer school
enrollments. A total of 1300 students
net is expected before the close of the
session according to Prof. E. H. Kraus.
As early as Wednesday night the
mark of 1238 had been reached; with
672 in the Literary department, includ-
ing graduates; 296 in the Engineering
department; 101 in the Department of
Medicine; 159 in the Law school; and
10 in the School of Pharmacy.
The following table compares the
enrollment of the 1911 and 1912 ses-
sions;

PROF FILIBERT ROTH, HEAD OF

FORESTRY DEPARTMENT DEAN VAUGIN ilHONOREDs BY
DOCTRS FTREES'TATES,
With the election of officers, the
session of the Northern Tri-State
Medical Association, held in the rooms
of the Wayne County Medical Society,
was brought to a close last Tuesday
afternoon. More than 15 physicians
representing the highest medical and
surgical talent of three states, were
in attendance; and they ceose Dean
Vaughan, of Michigan's Medical De-

partment, to be their president.
SLOW TO "TUMBLE" -
TO THE HUMOROUS
Professor Scott" Audienc uTakes
Notes on Imaginary Congress
of Letters.
LECTURE WILL BE PUBLISHED.
That the summer students here at
Michigan take themselves and their
work seriously was demonstrated by
the stolidity with which Prof. F. N.
Scott's humorous paper on the "Con-
gress of Letters" was received by the
audience collected at the West Physics
lecture room, Wednesday afternoon.
For at least ten minutes there was no
suggestion that the audience "fell;"
many were busy with their note taking
and not until the dance of the Zulu
chieftain did the humor of the situa-
tion present itself to all. In comment-
ing upon the fact Prof. Scott said that
the paper had been received with equal
seriousness at Vassar college-but
only for a few mniutes.
PROFESSOR F. N. SCOTT,

1911
Graduate School ......... 135
Literary Department .:... 470
Engineering Department.. 278
Medic Department ........ 97
Law Department ........ 139
Pharmacy School ....... 15
Total ...... . .. ....1134

1912
152
541
301
103
162
10
1269

SCIENCE AIMS TO
a. UPLIFTHEREDITY
Dean Vaughan Says Scientist's Phil.
osophy Centers in Desire to Im.
prove Physical Status.
WOULD LIKEN EARTH TO HEAVEN.
The West Amphitheatre of the Med-
ical Building partook of the nature of
an oven on Wednesday evening when
Dean Vaughan talked about the Phil-
osophy of the Scientist, but the dean
held the undivided attention of an
audience that almost entirely filled the
room. His speech was an expression
of his own views on his subject, and
was devoid of any feeling against any
religious sect or creed.
Ini its entirety it was a defense of
the man who devotes his life to the
gathering of facts, to dealings with
material things, and to the improve-
ment of man's environment. It denied
the supernatural in man, and argued
for the effect of body upon mind, rath-
er than for the effect of mind upon
body. It praised the Pasteurs and the
Listers, the Watts and the Fultons, the
Marconis and the Edisons, for the
great parts they have played in the
betterment of human conditions.
The doctrine of evolution according
to the dean, is the keystone of the
scientist's philosophy, and the belief
in heredity is for him a high incentive,
because these things make possible
that advancement which is to lift man
to a still higher civilization.
Paraphrasing the Dean, one might
say, "Let us be careful what we do
and think and say that the heritage of
our children may be better. Let us
fight against ignorance because it is
bad environment. Let us continue to
battle with the ubiquitous germ the
omnipresent menace that visits us in
our drinking water eats wtih us in our
boarding houses and sleeps with us
in Pullman cars; for the death of
the germ is the death of disease. Let
us encourage the invention of ma-
chines of war until they become so
deadly that war will be no longer pos-
.sible. Let us aid inventors in their
harnessing of nature and in their im-
provement of plants and animals-not
forgetting that man is an animal. Fin-
ally, let us do all these things because

PROF. ROTH'S WORK SHOWS RESULTS, IN CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS.
Another proof of the pre-eminence times in the past Michigan has at-
to which Michigan's Forestry depart- tained the same distinction.
ment has been brought by the remnark-caThe examination, in which Michigan
mblentehasienbougts he Proemkcarried off the honors, was for the
ahie efficiency of its head, Professor position of Forest Assistant in the
Filibert Roth is offered by the fact Government Service. Other univer-
that in the country-wide civil service sities which were represented are
examinations held last March not only Yale, Harvard, and Penn State.
did all but one of the- Michigan for- Prof. Roth Now En Route to Europe.
estry candidates pass "with flying col- Prof. Roth sails from New York for
ors" but highest mark of any man in Europe today with his family. They
the country was that of Robert C. St. will visit Spain first, then France,
Clair, of Berkley, Cal., a student at Germany, and perhaps England, and
Michigan during the past year. For will return before college opens in
four years in succession and many the fall.

TRUE EFFICIENCY
HAS MANY PHASES
President Hutchins Declares Essen-
tials to be Thoroughness, Enthus-
oasm and Sympathy.
The requisites of true efficiency, as
s'et forth last night by President
Hutchins, in his address on "The True
Measure of Efficiency," are ability to
master detail, familiarity with all de-
partments of one's, work, vital interest
and enthusiasm in the work, sane
optimism, sympathy for things human
and vital, thoroughness, and an intel-
ledtual equipment.
The president discussed briefly the
application of scientific methods to
business as evidenced by higher com-
mercial education, also to the profes-
sions, and to industry, particularly
agriculture and forestry.
Sane optimism was declared to be a
real necessity in rising above the ob-
stacles which confront one in the per-
formance of one's daily duties. Of
supreme importance, however, is the
ability, which university graduates
should possess, of being able to attain
a larger and higher efficiency than that
called for by their business or pro-
fession. While specialization "is in
the spirit of the age," President
Hutchins cautioned his hearers from
burying themselves within the nar-
row limits of a single calling, and
urged that something must be done by
every citizen for the public, for hu-
manity, and for the uplift of Civic
standards.
Hold Reception in Gymnasinm.
Following the address the faculty
reception to the summer students was
held in Barbour gymnasium. About
300 couples attended the reception and
dance which followed.
NEW YORK ALUMNI TO HELP
GRADUATES GET POSITIONS.
Committee on Business Information
Organized with E. D. Babst,
'94 L, as Chairman.
Following close upon the announce-
ment by the Chicago Alumni Associa-
tion of the establishment of an advis-
ory committee for Michigan graduates
who intend to make Chicago their
home, comes the news that the New
York alumni have taken a similar step.
The Governors of the club have ap-
pointed a Committee on Business In-
formation, with Mr. Earl D. Babst,
'94 L, as chairman. Its purpose is to
bring together in a business way grad-
uates of Michigan and New York busi-
ness men who may desire to employ
such men.
It is planned to make this commit-
tee much more than an employment
agency. The University faculty will
endeavor to furnish complete infor-
mation about graduates who intend to
locate in New York, and employers,
whether Michigan men or not, may
list their requirements with the com-
mittee. The systematic working out
of the plan will accomplish the pur-
pose of the originators, namely the
putting of specialists in places which
need them.
NEW NURSERY FOR FOREST RS.
Department Buys Land to Grow Trees,
East of Ferry Field.
A purchase of about two acres of
land has just been made by the de-
partment of Forestry, across from
Ferry Field. The plot is to be used as
a nursery for trees, and for experi-
ments by the classes in forestry.
The present nursery is east of town,

near Geddes and is difficnalt of access,
causing unnecessary inconvenience in
the students' work. This work con-
sists mainly of producing seedlings of
different forest trees and transplant-
ing them in neighboring farms and

they will bring nearer the time when
premature death will be no more, when
peace will abide with us, when every
man will labor and possess in a just
proportion, when Earth will be as
good a Heaven as one could ask.''
PROF. ROUSE ADVISES DIRECT
METHOD OF TEACHING LATIN.
"Self expression is the end of all
education," said Prof. W. H. D. Rouse,
noted educator of Cambridge Univer-
sity, in his lecture yesterday on "The
Direct Method of Teaching Latin,"
"Grammar is too often made an end;
it should be a means."
Professor Rouse pointed out that a
thorough knowledge of English should
be the foundation of learning other
languages and that a good start should
be made in each one before another
is taken up. The direct method re-
quires the student to think the sounds
of the language directly and to put
them into action without the use of
words. The child is made to speak
before he writes just as he learns his
native tongue.
In continuing his talk on Latin
teaching this morning Prof Rouse said
that English should be excluded as
much as possible, from the class room.
The value of the direct method is to
get the child to associate the word
with the thing and to think in Latin.
After four years of this method the
child can understand nearly every-
thing said to him.

FACULTY ADVISERS APPOINTED.
Foreign Students Will Have' Older
Men to Guide Them.
A committee of faculty advisers has
just been appointed by President
Hutchins for the foreign students in
the University. The chairman of the
committee is Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of
the German department
The plan has long been advocated
by members of the Cosmopolitan Club
of which all foreign students are
members, and last March the enate
Council of the faculty decided that it
should be given a try-out. Already
fifty-eight colleges and universities
have faculty advisers for the foreign
students.
There are in the University over 150
students from other lands including
Canada during the regular session and
the majority of these continue their
studies through the summer session.
The members of the faculty committee
besides Prof. Hildner will be announc-
ed later. The plan amounts to ap-
pointing older men to whom the stu-
dents from abroad, perplexed by some
problem in university or outside re-
lations, may go for counsel.
Summer Students Flock to Ypsi.
Ypsilanti Normal has taken the lead
of Michigan in enrolling students for
summer school. There are already
1,475 students in attendance at Ypsi,
and the authorities say they have no
idea where the enrollment will stop.

His Presentation of a Fanciful "Con.
gress of Letters" is Taken
Seriously.
The paper is a discussion of the
ultimate principles of literary critic-
ism in the form of an imaginary Con-
gress of Letters. For the sake of
diverting the minds of the revolution-
ary party the Chinese government calls
a Congress of Letters to which every
civilized country is to send representa'
tives. Such men as Bernard Shaw and
Gilbert Chesterton from England ex-
pound their ideas in a humorous way;
the Zulu chieftain, the American copy-
write, the German scientist, also con-
tribute; while the most serious ideas
are put in the mouth of the minister
of war from San Marino. The Con-
gress breaks up with the inraid of
the Chinese police, the various rep-
resentatives departing after being
bribed to secrecy concerning their
great work. The only intimation of
the momentous affair is received from
the diary of one of the Chinamen who
has escaped to this country and set
himself up in the laundry business in
Chicago.
Prof. Scott's manuscript will appear
in one of the current magazines.

PRES B YTER IAN 'CHURCH:
Communion Service, Sunday, 10:30 a. m.
ADDRESS BY
LEONARD A. BARRETT
Students in attendance at the summer session of the University are cordially invited

woodlands.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan