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July 16, 1959 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1959-07-16

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THH

TU XCHIGEAN DfAILY

acKay Beaten at Clay Court Tourney

(CAGO (I ..-I!Barry 'Mac-
made a long trip for prac-
r nothing. A nearly unknown
ster, Larry Nagler of North
wood, Calif., upset him roy-
esterday in a second round
h of the National Clay. Court
s Tournament.
,ler blasted . the tourna-
s No.t 2 seeded player 6-4,
after MacKay had experi-
l considerable difficulty ear-
i the day in defeating David
n, Skokie, Ill., 3-6, 6-2, 6-2.
cKay of Dayton, Ohio, and
eeded Alex Olmedo arrived
Europe Tuesday and missed

the first two days of tournament
play. They began trying to catch
up with the rest of the field yes-
terday by playing one singles
match after another under a
scorching sun with little inter-
vening rest.
Nagler said after his victory,
"MacKay didn't want to fight, so
he lost." The youngster, who
never has won a major tourna-
ment, expressed surprise that
MacKay, a 1958 Davis Cup team
regular, did not play in his usual
aggressive, charging style.
MacKay, ranked third nation-

ally, said , afterward, "I don't
want to make any excuses, but
I'm tired. It was 35 hours of trav-
eling."
Nagler, co-captain last year of
the UCLA freshman basketball
team, had worked hard in order
to reach the second round against
MacKay. The Californian defeat-
ed William Ball, Waterloo, Iowa,
4-6, 9-7, 6-1, Monday.
Last May, Nagler almost pulled
the upsets of the year against 01-
medo as he pushed the Peruvian-
Los Angeles star to three sets and
narrowly lost 3-6, 8-6, 10-8.

[SHED IN SEPTEMBER:
vork Begis on Field

By DAVE LYON
Associate Sports Editor
The floor of historic Yost Field
ouse was "bombarded" by 100-
tile slabs yesterday as work-
en began. the first stages of re
iring the'gaping hole in the
rof.
Repairs were necessitated when
freak windstorm May 11, de-
ribed. by some 'as a "baby tor-
do," carried away or damaged
e southeast quarter, of the roof
td wrecked the lighting system
ed for basketball games.
The steel girders and cables
pporting the roof tiles, however,
rnained intact. Yesterday work-
en on theroof began removing'
I loose and damaged tiles.
Like Cannon Shots
The slabs, falling 60 feet
rough the air, hit the Field
ouse floor below with impacts.
unding like cannon shots.
When all these tiles have been
moved, new tiles will be laid,
storing the roof to the condi-
on it was in before the storm. -
Bert Katzenmeyer, golf coach
id athletic dept. administrative
sistant, said Tuesday, "It ev-
ything goes according to sched-
e, all the repairs should be com~-
eted by .or during -the first half
September."
Causes of Delay
The two-month delay between
e storm and the starting of re-
irs, Katzenmeyer said, was
fused by the following: ~
1) Time spent determining the
:tent of damage to the roof
$100,000 is still a pretty good
rure to use," Katzenm eyer
Id);
2) Determining whether the
of should be merely patched, or
stored (and deciding on the
tter);
3) Finding out whether the tile

company could supply tiles of the'
proper size (4'x21/2'x2" thick).
"Had this storm happened dur-
ing the fall or winter," Katzen-
meyer added, "the delay would
have been shorter," the roof
merely patched and permanent
repairs made later.
Out of Stock
It developed that the tile com-
pany no longer stocked the type
of roofing tile that was used in
1923, the year Yost (the nation's
oldest college field house) was
built.
They had to design new molds'
and start making this typeof tile
all over again," Natzenmeyer
said.
Damage to the: building was
covered by insurance. "The Uni-
versity- has an insurance com-
pany that covers all its build-
ings," the golf coach said.

louse Roof
Katzenmeyer added that "as
far as I know" it was the first.
time the Field House or any Uni-
versity athletic building' had in-
curred such severe damage.
Spri g me
In Moscow
MOSCOW (AP) - A little known
R u s si a n track athlete high
jumped 6 feet, 9 inches, then
cleared 6-101/5 before the judges
became curious and discovered
springs attached to his heels.
The Russian sports newspaper,
Soviet Sport, told the story yes-
terday. It identified the athlete
as Vasily Khoroshilov, of Rostov.
It did not' describe how the
springs were attached nor how
they operated.

Olmedo had no trouble in his
first two matches defeating Gor-
don Fleming, Flint, Mich., 6-0,
6-0, and Lee Bishop, Winnetka,
Ill,.,.6-0, 6-2.
Alex worked a bit harder
against the neat placements of
Mac White, Corpus C h r is t i,
Texas, before picking up his ad-
mission ticket to the quarterfinals
-a 6-3, 6-4 decision. When asked
if he was tired after three singles
matches, Olmedo replied, "No, I
am young.'"
Nagler later moved up another
notch to the round of 16 on a win
over Ron Fisher, Houston, 6-4,
6-4. Olmedo and Buchholz, the
top-seeded men's doubles team,
took a first round victory over
Chester Demus and Len Ander-
son, both of River Forest, Ill., 6-0,
6-2.
Buchholz Upset
Art Andrews. of Iowa City ac-
complished another major upset
when he dumped out Earl Buch-
holz Jr. of St. Louis 2-6, 6-4, 9-7.
Andrews, 21-year-old 1958 Big
Ten champion from Iowa City,
Iowa, played steady tennis while
Buchholz, No. 4 seed, wasted nu-
merous slamming opportunities.
Warren Woodcock, of Austra-
lia, No. 2 foreign seed, spilled
Chris Crawford of Piedmont,
Calif., seeded sixth among do-
mestic entries, 6-3, 7-5, to enter
a quarterfinals pairing against
defending champion Bernar d
(Tut) Bartzen of Dallas, Tex.
Tut won his fourth round
match over Mike Green, Miami,
6-2; 6-3.
Foreign Ace Falls
The No. 1' foreign seed, Ian
Vermaak of South' Africa, fell
from singles competition under a
6-2, 6-4 smashing by Whitney

Leads Race
HONOLULU (A - Arnold
Haskell's 66-foot yawl Chubasco
sailed past Diamond Head just
before dawn yesterday, the pos-
sible winner of the 2,225-mile
yacht race from Los Angeles.'
Because of handicap allow-
ances, however, the winner may
not be known for a week. Some of
the -two score boats in the race
were as much as 600 miles from
Honolulu at daily position report
yesterday. The race started July 4.
The Chubasco, out of Newport
Beach, Calif., made the crossing
in 10 days, 20 hours, 18 minutes.
Ralph Larrabe's Goodwill, a
161-foot schooner, also from
Newport Beach, crossed the finish
line some eight hours earlier -
despite loss of her topmastrfive
days from Honolulu. But the
Goodwill's' handicap - an added
12 hours, 6 minutes - already
has ruled her out as winner.
Observers here believed that
the Chubasco's time, less her han-
dicap of slightly more than 36
hours, gave her an excellent
chance of winning.
The main threat appeared to be
Peter Grant's 46-foot sloop Nalu
II of Newport Beach. At report
time the Nalu II was 354 miles
out and was second in handicap
standings. Favorable winds for
the remaining distance could
sweep her ahead of the Chubasco.
Third across the finish line was
the 75-foot schooner Constella-
tion of Beverly Hills, Calif. Sally
Blair Ames, 29-year-old owner
and skipper, was at the helm.
Miss Ames plans to sail the
Constellation to Tahiti after re-
fitting here.

Reed, highly regarded entry from
Alameda, Calif.
R. Dennis Ralston, Bakersfield,
Calif., junior who Tuesday
knocked off seventh seeded Don-
ald Dell of Bethesda, Md., lost
his fourth round match to South
Africa's Abe Segal, 6-1, 6-1.

Chubasco

JAVELIN TALK-Discussing Russian javelin just prior to working
out Tuesday for Soviet-U.S. track meet in Philadelphia, Pa., are
Alevtina Shastikko of Russia, Marjorie Larney of U.S., and Birute
Kaledene of Russia, left to right. The meet is this weekend.
Russian Women Athletes
Not Super, Coach Says

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DANISH WOMAN SAYS:
Will.Swim En*lish Channel Both Ways

PHILADELPHIA (0" - Ed
Temple, coach of the American
gals who meet the Russians in the
big international track meet of
the year this weekend, no longer
considers the Moscow lasses su-
perwomen.
"When I took our team to Rus-
sia last year," said Temple yes-
terday, "I didn't know what to
expect. Everyone told me the Rus-
sians were unbeatable. But we
won four of the 10 events on the
program and surprised everyone."
The Russians outscored Tem-
ple's team, 63-44, and are favored
to win handily again this time.
"I'll concede they have the ad-
vantage in the field events," said
Temple, who coaches at Tennes-
see State for a living. "but we
may surprise them again just as
we did last year."

NEW YORK () - Greta An-~
dersen Sonnichsen is 147 pounds
of pulchritude, charm and per-
sonality.
She also swims.
She swims well enough to be-
lieve she can conquer the English
Channel the hard way, meaning
both ways non-stop, and she's go-
ing to try it when she competes.
in the annual Channel Race Aug.
27.
"I'm quite confident I can do
it," said the Danish-born former
O1 y m p i a ,100-meter free-style
champion, "because I made the
round trip to Catalina Island. No-
body ever did it before. My 10:47
mark broke the men's record go-
ing over, and my 15:35 bettered

7

the women's record coming back.
And the distance and currents
approximate those of the Chan-
nel."
Mrs. Sonnichsen -' her hus-
band, John, is a high school foot-
ball coach at San Pedro, Calif.,
and serves as her trainer - has
won 15 marathon events since
starting her pro competitive ca-
reer in.1956. In seven of them she
also defeated the male swimmers.
Last weekend she won the wo-
men's division of the Atlantic City
Swim, and her husband said she
could have beaten the winner -
Cliff Lumsden of Canada.
"I goofed," he admitted. 'I was
plotting her course and at one,
point I told her to go left. Lums-
den went rightuand gained about
400 yards, enough to win."
The refreshing Dane - she be-
came a naturalized American
citizen in 1958' - didn't start to
swim until she was 15. Five years
later she won an Olympic gold
medal.
"I was afraid of the water," she
said. "Even now I won't dive
from a board."
Sonnichsen revealed one of the
secrets of his wife's success, also
pointing out she trains religiously
every day and watches her diet
zealously.
"We always are experimenting
to improve her performance," he
explained. "Any part of the body

above water is a handicap, as it
creates air friction. So we try to
keep her arms under water as
much as possible by using an ex-
ceptionally long stroke.

Sikes Garners Victories
In Publinx Golf Tourney

Major League Standings

I

NATIONAL LEAGUE.
W L Pet.
an Francisco 49 37 .570
s Angeles 50 40 .556
ilwaukee 46 37 .554
ttsburgh 47 41 .534
alcago 43. 44 .494'
. Louis 41 45 .477
ncinnatl 38 49 .437
hiliadelphia 31 52 .373

20-4. They won the broad jump,
all right, but it was 19-6."
This time Temple expects his
team to win the 100 meters, 200
meters, 400-meter relay and pos-
sibly the shot put and broad
jump.
"We definitely have the best,
sprinters and relay team," Temple
said.
Shot Putter Rusty
"We won the shot with Mrs.
Earlene Brown last yea,r but to
be honest about it, Mrs. Brown is
not in as good condition this year
as she was last. She hasn't gotten
off a 50-footer yet. If she wants
to beat Tamara Press of Russia,
she'll have to do better.
"We just might win the broad
jump. Our Margaret Mathews
jumped 21 feet in practice, which
is three inches better than. the
world record.
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AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cleveland 47 35 .573 -
Chicago 48 36 .571 -
Baltimore 45 41 .523 4
New York 42 43 .494 6%
Washington 41 44 .482 7Y2
Detroit 42 46 .477 8
Boston 38 46 .452 10
Kansas City 36 48 .429 12
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City at Baltimore, rain
Cleveland at New York, rain
Washington 3, Detroit 0
Chicago at Boston, rain
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Baltimore (N)
Cleveland at New York (2)
Detroitat.Washington (N)
Chicago at Boston (2)

DENVER () Medalist Danv
Sikes Jr. scrambled to two nar-
row victories yesterday in open-
ing defense of his National Pub-
lic Links Golf Championship.
The 28-year-old University of
Florida law student nipped Al
Benefiel of Denver 1 up in the
first round and edged Marshall
Strauss of Highland, Ill., 2 and 1
in the second 18-hole round.
"I had to go real hard," Sikes
said. "My game wasn't as good
as Tuesday."
He shot a 3-under-par 68 Tues-
day to take medalist honors with
137 over the 6,617-yard, par-fit
Wellshire Municipal Course.
The two rounds yesterday
trimmed the match play field of
64 golfers to 16 for another two
rounds today.
Don Essig III, Indianapolis, the
1957 champion, was carried to 20
holes before defeating Steve

Swain of Los Angeles in his first-
round match.
The big casualties in the first
round were Mat Palacio Jr., San
Rafael, Calif., and Rich Casa-
bella, Louisville, Ky., who quali-
fled with 138s, a stroke behind
Sikes.
New Walk Record
LONDON M - Anatoliy Ye-
gorov of Leningrad bettered the
world record for the 30 kilometer
walk yesterday when he -covered
the distance in two hours 17 min-
ules and 16.8 seconds.
The listed world record of
2:20:40.2 is held by A. Vedjakov
of Russia. The Moscow Radio also
sad Yegorov bettered the world
2-hour walking record by cover-
ing 26,429 meters.

Suspicious of Claims
For one thing, Temple is slight-
ly suspicious of some of the Rus-
sian claims.
"In last year's meet, the Rus-
sians were bragging that their
sprinters could do the 100 meters
in 11.3 (which would equal the
world record), and yet our Bar-
bara Jones won the event in 11.6,"
Temple said.
"They were talking about their
board jumpers doing 20-3 and

t
4,

rL

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
an Francisco 'at Philadelphia, rain
os Angeles 3, Pittsburgh 0
,hicago 5, Milwaukee 2
incinnati 11, St. Louis 5
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at St. Louis (N)
Only game ,scheduled.

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