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July 02, 1959 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-0

T RnSnAY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY.

.acKay Eliminated, Olmedo in Finals

SENATORS LIKE BASEBALL:
Third League Backers
Get Congress Support

IMBLEDON, England WA')-
-seeded Alex Olmedo marched
id with machine-like effici-
* but his U.S. Davis Cup team-
e, Barry MacKay, bowed out
bing in a marathon flve-setter
erday in the semifinals of the
nbledon Tennis Champion-
is
Lmedo, losing only one service
master all the way, erased
ralia's No. 2 ace, Roy Emer-
in exactly 60 minutes, 6-4,
6-4.
2e storied center court, how-
proved heartbreak house for
Kay, the lumbering slugger
i Dayton, Ohio, who gave it
ything he had but still went
a before Rod (The Rocket)
er, a 20-year-old Australian
gander.
aver won 11-13, 11-9, 10-8, 7-9,
in a match which swayed back
forth 'for 3 hours and 45
utes. The bitter, exhausting
ggle reached its high point in
fourth set when MacKay,
.ing 2-5 at one stage, fought
five match points and finally
the set to level the match.

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He shot ahead 3-1 in the deci-
sive fifth set but confidence and
control suddenly deserted him and
Laver reeled off five games in a
row.
"No excuses," MacKay puffed
later. "Laver was too good, that's
all. I seemed to lose my confi-
dence."
Double-faults-and old affliction
for the power-hitting Yank-came,
up to haunt MacKay again. He
served 25 double-faults in all,. a
half-dozen in the vital fifth set
when every misplaced shot put
him a step nearer elimination.
Olmedo Favored
Now Olmedo, the Peruvian liv-
ing and going to school in Los
Angeles, is overwhelmingly favored
to take the title earmarked for
him ever since he carried the
United States to victory in the
Davis Cup challenge round last
December.
Laver is a junior member of the
Australian Davis Cup Squad who
is better known for his doubles
proficiency than. for singles. He
was unseeded in the tournament--

the second unseeded player since
World War II to gain the last
round. Kurt Nielsen did it in 1953
and 1955.
The bronzed Olmedo, a descend-
ant of the Incas, hardly had a
workout. against Emerson, a 22-
year-old Queenslander from sub-
tropical Brisbane.
In the opening set the.happy-
go-lucky "chief"-as friends call
him-broke Emerson in the open-
ing game ,and ran up a 2-0 lead.
Emerson rebroke in the fourth
but Olmedo cracked the Austra-
lian's delivery with sharp back-
hand service returns in the seventh
and then rode out the set.
Second Set Easy
'The second set was a slaughter.
It lasted 12 minutes and Emerson
never had a chance against Ol-
medo's artistic but destructive at-
tack. In one game Emerson lost
his service without winning a
point.
The third set followed servicef
for eight games. In the ninth Alex
got Emerson down 15-40 on the
Australian's service with crisp,
angled returns, forcing volleying
errors, and then he won it with a
beautiful passing shot, climaxing
a long rally. Four big shots gave
Olmedo the final and clinching
game at love.-
The first three sets were a battle
of MacKay's thunderbolt serve and
volley game and the lightning re-
flexes of the bandy-legged redtop
from down under.

In the fourth set Laver had three first, aced him cleanly with a can-
match points at, 5-2 with MacKay nonball on the second and made
serving. But the American forced him miss a running forehand on
him into a volleying e'rror on the the third.

NEW YORK OP) - Bill Shea,
chairman of Mayor Robert Wag-
ner's New York Baseball Com-
mittee, disclosed an ace in the hole
yesterday in case baseball tries to
balk his plans for a third major
league.
It's the U.S. Congress.
Shea called a press conference
to announce that he had been sum-
moned to Washington by Sen. Es-
tes Kefauver (D-Tenn.), chairman
of the powerful Senate Judiciary
Committee and head of a sub-com-
mittee dealing with anti-trust and
monopoly.
"The senator was pessimistic
about our chances of getting a
green light from the major league
club owners," Shea said. "He sug-
gested that he might begin hear-
ings immediately on his bill aimed
at - baseball's monopolistic prac-
tices.
"I told him that I felt the base-
ball owners were sincere in their
announcement out of Columbus
recently that they would talk to
us about expansion and I urged
him to hold off his hearings.
He agreed."
Shea didn't say so but he gave
the impression that Kefauver is
laying down the law to the dia-
mond executives-approve the pro-
posed new league or watch out.
"I am sure the owners are con-
scious of the tenor in Congress,"
Shea said.

Shea is spearhead of the group
which has set 1960 as a target for
rounding up players.
He said he and his supporters-
generally referred to as the "five
founders"-will be ready to submit
a plan to baseball between July 15
and the second All-Star Game at
Los Angeles Aug. 3.
Scorer Says
Sorry Sam'
LOS ANGELES (P)-"I did it,
Mw, and I'm sorry, for Sam
Jones' sake. .. . but I'd call it the
same way again."
That's the way the official scorer
of the Giant-Dodger game Tues-
day night led off his story about
a disputed decision that deprived
Sam Jones of a no-hit, no-run
game.
The scorer who made the deci-
sion is baseball writer Charlie Park
of the Mirror News.
He ruled that Dodger Junior
Gilliam could have beat out an
eighth-inning bounder that Giant
shortstop' Andre Rodgers dropped,
calling it a single. Jones thought it,
should have been an error against
Rodgers. The Giants won, 2-0. And
Jones' performance went into the
books as a one-hitter.

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U.S. TENNIS ACE-Alex Olmedo, top-seeded in the Wimbledon
tennis tourne┬▒, got off to a winning start in his first match.
Olmedo, Peruvian star of the U.S. Davis Cup team, is shown in
action as he defeated Australian Warren Woodcook, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3.

MUIRFIELD, Scotland (M--Two
nknown British players, Fred
hullock and Arnold Stickley, yes-
erday shot 68 for the lead in the
ritish Open . Golf Championship
nd then sat back, and enjoyed
hemselves as high winds and rain
ent later scores rocketing.
Bullock, a 40-year-old pro play-
ng in only his second tournament
his season, and 43-year-old Stick-
ey got in their rounds before the
,806-yard, par 36-36-72 Muirfield
ayout became a rough, tough test.
Playing Made Difficult
Early in the afternoon winds up
o 40 miles an hour and short,
harp rainstorms added three or
our more strokes to the course.
fflicted by these conditions and
y greens that already were slow
rom last night's rains, were Peter
'homson, the defending champion
rom Australia, young Gary Player
f South Africa and.several other
avorites.
Up to yesterday Muirfield had
een fairly easy with dry, warm
reather and virtually no wind.
)nly Tuesday Thomson had shot
record-equalling 66.
Antonio Cerda, an Argentine pro
laying in his 11th British Open,
lso was out early in the easier
onditions and finished one stroke
ehind the leaders with a brilliant
3-36--69. Most of the three play-
rs who had 70 and the seven who
ad 71 also got in ahead of the
rorst weather.
Garrett Leads Americans
John Garrett, 23-year-old ama-
ajor League'
Standtngs
AMERICAN LEAGUE

teur from Houston, Tex., was the
best of the four Americans with
36-40-76. Four years ago Garrett,
then a student at Rice, was run-
ner-up to Joe Campbell in the U.S.
National Collegiate Championship.
He now is a soldier stationed in
Germany.
SWillie Goggin, World Senior Pro-
fessional Champion from San Jose,
Calif., took 39-39-78 and Bob
Sweeny, veteran Palm Beach, Fla.,
amateur who has been runner-up
in both the U.S. and British Ama-
teur Championships, had 38-40-
78.
Bob Watson, a pro from Ardsley-
On-Hudson, N.Y., took 40-42-72
and commented bitterly that he
never should have left his club.
U.S. Rower
Victorious
HENLEY-ON-THAMES, England
(A) - Harvard's unbeaten light-
yeight crew made a fine start in
defense of the Thames Challenge
Cup yesterday as'the Royal Henley
Regatta opened in drizzling rain.
The Union Boat Club eight from
Boston and two United States
fours also won their opening heats
on the narrow Thames river.
American oarsmen suffered only
one setback-a heartbreaking loss
by the Schoolboy Eight from Phil-
lips Academy, Andover, Mass.
The Harvard lightweights rowed j
with four of the same men who
won the Thames Challenge Cup-
No. 2 trophy for eight-oared crews
in this unofficial world champion-
ship of rowing. They won handily
by two lengths from the Crowland
Rowing Club of London but their
style didn't satisfy their coach.
"Technically Harvard didn't row
too well," said Coach Larry Cool-'
idge after seeing his boat cover
the mile and 550 yards course
against a moderate breeze in 7
minutes, 23 seconds.
"The boys had a slight case of
jitters. They did not know what to
expect from English crews and I'm
afraid they looked a little ragged."
The time was somewhat slower
than the record for the Thames:
event. That is 6:45, set by the
Princeton lightweights in 1953.
SCORES
Bacteriology 5, Education 3
Sawbones 7, Misfits 6
Chemistry 16, Speech 2
Ramblers 21, Trees 5

I

I

~I

Four's Enough 0..

I

,,

f
a4
}

x-Cleveland
x-Chicago
x-Baltimore
Detroit
x-New York
x-Washington
Kansas C~ty
x-Boston
x-Played night1

W L
40 30
39 .33.
38 35
39 36┬░
37 35
33 39
31 40
31 40
games.

Pct.
.571
.542
.521
.520
.514
.458
.437
.437

GB
2
3%
4
8
91/

NOW
UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL
CAN SAVE $200 ON
NEW CAR FINANCING

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(See night game results below)
Detroit 5, Kansas City 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Kansas" City (N)
Boston at Washington (
Chicago at Detroit (N)
New York at Baltimore (N)

I

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Milwaukee 42 31 .575
San Francisco 43 33 .566
Los Angeles 43 35 .551
x--Pittsburgh 39 37 .513
Chicago 37 37 .500
St. Louis 35 39 .473
Cincinnati 33 41 .446
x--Philadelphia 26 45 .366
x-Played night game.

GB
-
1Y2
4%
5%
9Y
15

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
ISee night game results below)
Chicago 6, St. Louis 5
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Philadelphia (2)
San Francisco at Chicago
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh (N)
Los Angeles at St. Louis (N)

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Night Game Results
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, called
Chicago 6, Cleveland 5"
]Philadelphia 1, Pittsburgh 0 e C US
New York 4, Baltimore 0_________________
Washington 4, Boston 1 're nUS o P d
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