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July 01, 1959 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iom son, Carr Lead Open Qualifying

CI

[R1FIELD, Scotland (MP)-De-
.g champion Peter Thomson
istralia and Joe Carr, a
a Walker Cup golferafrom
d, played their way into the
tbooks yesterday and sinul-
usly led 90 qualifiers into
irst round proper of the
1 Open Golf Championship.
mson, winner of the cham-
ip four times in the past
'ears, equalled Henry Cot-
11-year-old record for the

6,806-yard links at Muirfield and
headed the qualifiers with a two-
round total of 71-66-137.
Carr, a lean, lanky Dublin
haberdasher, used a 3-iron for
putting on the greens at Gullane
and smashed both the amateur
and professional records for the
links. He went round the 6,491-
yard course in 8-under-par 64-
two better than Scotsman Alex
Tibbles' professional record and,

four better than Scotsman Jack
Inches' amateur record.
Three-Way Tie
Carr wound up in a three-way
tie for second place with 74-64-
138. Neil Coles, an English pro
who played in the American cir-
cuit last winter, tied him with
.68-70-138 and Frank Jowle, 45,
of England did it with 67-71---
138.
Four Americans were among

RE, HARD SCORE VICTORIES:
Imericans in Wim bdon Semifinals

'IMBLEDON, EnglandW H-
y' Moore and Darlene Hard
their way into the women's
les semifinals of the Wimble-
Tennis Championships yes-
ay, keeping alive the hope
the United States can main-
the grip on the women's title'
as held since 1938.
aria Bueno of Brazil and San-
Reyn~ds of South Africa also;
anced with victories as sparkl-
and full of thrills as those
Led in by the two California
iss Moore, 18, powerful and
ident, did it the easy way.
scored a 6-3, 6-2 victory over
, Ramirez, a little Mexican
who stands hardly higher
i the net.
Had Close Call
it bouncy, happy-go-lucky
Hard, a Wimbledon finalist
years ago, barely got by Ann
don, a lefthanded English girl
ranks as one of the world's
ing table tennis players. The
es were 1-6, 6-4, 7-5.
aceful Miss Bueno, one of the
'stylish players competing in
bournament, defeated Roman-
born Edda Buding, who. pre-
sly upset third-seeded Mrs.
rly Baker 'Fleitz. She' won
6-3.
etty Sandra Reynolds of
h Africa rounded out the job
iminating the favorites when
defeated Angela Mortimer of
tin, the second seed, 7-5, 8-6.
us the women's singles tour-
ent was left without the top
e seeded players and without
itish player in the semifinals.
II American Final Possible
i all-American final remains
ossibility, since Miss Hard,]
ed fourth, will meet Miss Rey-
s, No, 5, and Miss Moore, No.
.11 play Miss Bueno, No. 6, in
semifinals tomororw.
e men's semifinals-will be run
oday with Barry MacKay of
on, Ohio, going against Rod
r of Australia and top-seeded
Olmedo of Peru and Los An-

gelesr 'pposing Roy Emerson of
Australia.
Miss Hard, whose home is Mon-
tebello, Calif., came as close to de-
feat as a player can get and still
pull out the match. Twenty-year-
old Miss Haydon dominated play
in the first set and a center court
crowd of 13,000 watched in sur-
prised silence as game after game
slipped away from the 23-year-
old American.
Miss Hard netted volleys and
over - hi t service returns. She
served with good pace but Miss
Haydon snapped the ball back
with hard hit chops and drives.
Well into the second set Miss
Hard was still having trouble get-'
ting her game together.
Began To Come Back
Then, trailing 2-4, .-,Darlene
tapped herself on the temple with
her fist and began her long climb
back.
Miss Haydon had a 40-30 lead
on her own service in the seventh
game when the girls engaged in
a torrid duel at the net. Darlene
won tiat point with a sizzling kill

and the one point produced a re-
markable psychological effect.
Miss Hard regained confidence
all at once and her opponent
seemed worried for the first time.
U.S. Rowers
In England
HENLEY-ON-THAMES, Eng-
land (A") - Harvard's defending
champion lightweights tomorrow
open the Crimson's bid for a
sweep of two of the Royal Henley
Regatta's most prized trophies-
the Grand Challenge and Thames
Challenge Cups for eight-oared
crews.
Both the Harvard entries went
through unbeaten seasons and
both won Eastern U.S. Sprint
Championships.
The Harvard 155-pounders are
defending the Thames Cup which
was captured last year by another
all-winning Harvard lightweight
aggregation,

the 90 qualifiers, who will start
all over today in the 72-hole
championship proper. The quali-
fying scores don't, count in the
main event. The four are Willie
Goggin, the World Senior Profes-
sional Champion from San Jose,
Calif., 70-72-142; pro Bob Wat-
son, Ardsley-On-Hudson, N. Y.,
75-72-147; and amateurs John
Garrett, Houston, Tex., 74-73-
147, and Bob Sweeny, Palm
Beach, Fla., 73-74-147.
Muirfield Rough
Muirfield has been called a big,
mean old golf course. Gullane is
shorter and somewhat easier but
also has an approximate par of
72. Neither was much of a prob-
lem yesterday when it was balmy
and dry. There was scarcely a
breeze blowing over either course.
The 147 score required to quali-
fy was the lowest in the history
of the 99-year-old championship.
In addition to the record scores
by Carr and Thomson, South Af-
rica's Harold Henning shot a 66
at Gullane, equalling the pro rec-
ord. There were 11 other scores
under 70 on the twp seaside
courses.
Carr's round at Gullane ap-
proached the fantastic. The 37-
year-old Irishman who has won
the British Amateur Champion-
ship twice, drove the 308-yard
first greeh and sank a 200-foot
putt for an eagle 2. That started
him on his way out in' 31 and,
back in 33.
"It could have been- ever lower.
I missed holeable putts at three
holes," Carr said.
Accurate Long Game
His long game was amazingly
accurate and he drove such great
distances that at many holes he
needed only a short pitch to reach
the greens. He sank two 12-foot
putts.
Thomson, who regularly plays
a circuit that takes him to three
continents, came to the last green
at Muirfield needing a 3 to break
Cotton's record. His approach
landed 20 feet from the cup. The
calm Australian studied the putt
carefully, then missed by an inch
as the gallery of 2,000 moaned.
Thomson sank putts of 30, 35
and 30 feet on the outward nine
and putted another from 30 feet
comin gin. The only blemish on
his round was that he three-
putted the 17th green.
'Henning Like Locke
Henning was putting with the
sure touch of his famous country-
man, Bobby Locke, as he shot his
36 at Gullane. Locke, incidentally,
qualified for a shot at his fifth
British Open title with 70-72-
142.
Two other South Africans were
among the low qualifiers. Gary
ajor League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Player, the stylish 23-year-old
who plays a lot in America, shot
a 68 at Muirfield for 139 and
Brian Wilkes made it with 141.
Of the Americans who didn't
make the grade, David Bearse, a
pro in Germany whose home is
Dennisport, Mass., came closest.
He had 77-74-151.
NL AllN-Star
Players Set
CINCINNATI (AP)-The National
League team for the All-Star
Game in Pittsburgh July 7 was
completed yesterday-and it in-
cluded that grand veteran of such
contests, Stan Musial.
For the first time in many years
Musial was left out of the starting
lineup by the National League
players, who selected it by vote.
The players didn't even have
Musial among their second
choices.
But.Fred Haney of the Mil-
waukee club, who chose the other
17 members of the team, saw to it
that Stan the Man will be on the
squad for the game against the
American League team for the
16th year.
In that time, the St. Louis vet-
eran went to bat 54 times, and
made 17 hits for a total of 34
bases. He also hit five homers.
Each of those figures represent
records in All-Star competition. In
addition, Musial is tied with Ted
Williams, the great American
League veteran, for most number
of runs scored-20.
The remainder of manager
Haney's 17 selections caused no
surprise. His pitching staff will
consist of Johnny Antonelli, San
Francisco; Lew Burdette, Milwau-
kee; Gene Conley, Philadelphia;
Don Drysdale, Los Angeles; Roy
Face, Pittsburgh; Wilmer Mizell,
St. Louis, and Warren Spahn,
Milwaukee. Spahn was picked for
the 11th time.
The starting lineup, as chosen
by the players-with the excep-
tion of the pitcher - was an-
nounced last Sunday as follows:
Orlando Cepeda, San Francisco,
1B; Johnny Temple, Cincinnati,
2B; Ernie Banks, Chicago, SS;
Ed Mathews, Milwaukee, 3B; Del
Cra'ndall, Milwaukee, C; Wally
Moon, Los Angeles, LF; Willie
Mays, San Francisco, CF, and
Hank Aaron, Milwaukee, RF.

FOR RENT
OUR RECREATION ROOM overlooking
Huron River 1 mile from campus is
for rent to refined young married
couple. Phone after 6 or before 9:30.
NO 3-5126. C22
CAMPUS, clean, 4 room furnished
apartment, $70. NO 3-4322. C
LARGE 3 bedroom house. Modern ranch
type with attached garage. Large
paneled living room with fireplace
and view. Stove, refrigerator, washer,
dryer, ironer and disposal. 1% blocks
from elementary school. Conveniently
nearrNorth Campus and hospitals.
Owner will care for yard and pay
water. Year lease or longer, $175 per
month. NO 3-8677. C20
3 BEDROOM furnished apt, for 4 girls
or 4 boys. Includes silver and dishes.
Tastefully decorated by interior dec-
orator. Convenient Liberty St. loca-
tion. $160 per month, including heat
and water. Phone NO 3-5088 evenings.
C19
APARTMENTS FOR RENT. "Furnished
or unfurnished," on and off campus
location, two bedroom, abundant
closet space, tiled bathroom and
shower, large living room, air-con-
ditioned if desired,. birch kitchen,
closets and counters, Westinghouse
electric range and refrigerator, wash-
ers 'and driers. Tel. NO 2-7787. On
evenings and Sundays after 6, NO
5-6714 or NO 5-5515. C17
2 BDRM. apt. on 1st floor. Stove, refrig.
Campus. $110 includes everything. NO
3-4747. C16
ROOMS FOR MEN: Quiet. Campus area.
Linens furnished. Low rent. NO 3-4747.
C15
SINGLE ROOM, private bath, linens,
near campus and hospital. NO 5-5605.
C13
FURNISHED: Campus apts., 1 or 2
bdrhs. Boys, girls, families. Single
beds. Summer rates and fall rates.
344 S. Division. Also caretaker apt.
C11
COOL COMFORT-Everything you want
in an Ann Arbor apaartment.
5 FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED ROOMS
T.V. * * * HI FI * * * Modern Kitchen
and Bath *** Washing Machine
* ** Backyard and carport.
HURRY - Call NO 2-3036 after 5
This is the way to live.
C
CAMPUS SPECIAL, summer rate, 5
room furnished apt., $75 including
utilities. NO 3-4322. C5

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
TRANSPORTATION
FLYING PRIVATE PLANE to San Fran-
cisco and return by way of Denver-
next week 5 days. Need passengers.
Ideal 'vacation. Phone MI 6-5397, Bir-
Mingham, evenings. )0S
RIDE WANTED: Round trip to Aurora,
Illinois on July 4th weekend. Phone
NO 5-6063. C}

Most frames replaced
while you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated.
FAST service on all repairs.
240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019
J6
TYPING: Thesis. Term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
Jil

BUSINESS SERVICES

CAMPUS
OPTICIANS

COMMUTERS to Dearborn. Rider or WE'RE on Packard around the corner
driver needed. LOgan 1-8709. G3 fnmJ afH fa~ . n t1a ~1

Rent A Car
514 E. Washington St.
NO 3-4156
Fords and Other Fine Cars
Rented by Hour, Day, or Week
WEEKEND SPECIAL RATE
from Friday 5 P.M. till
Monday 9A.M.
$10.00 plus $.08 per mile
Gas, oil and insurance included
Gi
FOR SALE
KUPSCHORN
Loudspeaker system (Lab. model)
$150. NO 2-4630
B4
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S SKIP-dent and plisse short-
sleeve sport shirts. $1.39, 2 for $2.50.
Wash 'n Wear, sanforized, 'assorted
colors. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washing-
ton. W
PERSONAL
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share spa-
cious 5 room apartment, with swim-
ming pool. $90 from now 'till Sept. 1.
NO 5-7356. F10

rrom State :street. Stop at Ralph's
anytime 'till 12 Midnight for the
very best in foods.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
J4
.ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM and/or Board, excellent meals at
Tappan International House. Call Mrs.
Griffee at NO 5-5703. El
BOARDERS WANTED: Good food at
reasonable prices. Short walk from
campus. Call Hse. Mgr. at NO 2-8312.
E2
HELP WANTED
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Sales work
on salary and commission basis for
men 18 and over. Apply in person
8 AM- P+M., 224 S. First St. 7
USED CARS
'58 Volkswagen $1,645
Gasoline heater l Immaculate
Mich. European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N9
'59 VOLKSWAGEN. Sun roof. Call NO
3-8279. 1N10
'56 OLDS cony., all power, white walls,
leather seats, new top, sharp. $1,395.
NO 2-1443. N5
FORD, 1954 Custom V-8, Fordomatic.
Good condition, extras. NO 3-6886.
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT Sept. 1st, 2 or 3
bedroom house with fenced yard, by
Doctor while doing graduate work.
Will sign 1 or 2 year lease. Li
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
LEARN TO PLAY Hammond Spinet or-
gan. $15 per month, includes lesson
in our studio. Rent a Spinet piano
of your own choice-$10 per month.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
S1

St. 'Louis Defeats. Chicago
As Baseballs Get Mixed-Up

ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts. ERVICE ACCESSORIES
514 So.-Forest. NO 2-1443. 01CA1 SRIC,"CESORE

CHICAGO P) - The St. Louis
Cardinals, behind the 4-hit hurl-
ing of Larry Jackson, defeated the
Chicago Cubs 4-1 yesterday in a
game marked by two baseballs be-
ing in play at' the same time in
the fourth inning.
The victory was the surging
Cardinals' fourth in a row and
16th in their last 23 starts. And
it probably saved some red tape
for it eased the protest that Card-
inal manager Solly Hemus lodged
after the fourth inning ruling.
In the confused fourth what
happened had the old timers try-
ing to remember anything simi-
lar on record.
With one out, Stan Musial

T !TTT!!rd-

MORRI LL'S
Summer Store Hours:

8-5 Weekdays... 9-1

Saturdays

walked on a 3-1 pitch. The ball
hit both Chicago catcher Sammy
Taylor and plate umpire Vic Del-
more. Taylor protested the call,
with Musial rounding first and
starting for second.
Bat Boy Picks Up Ball
Meanwhile, Cub third baseman
Al Dark ran to the backstop
where the ball had bounced. But
the St. Louis bat boy picked it up
and flipped it to the field- an-
nouncer, Pat Piper, who is in.
charge of keeping the baseballs
for the umpire.
As the ball rolled towards Piper,
Dark scooped it up and threw tor
shortstop Ernie Banks, trying to
get Musial at second.
At the same time Dark threw,
catcher Taylor, getting a second
baseball from Delmore, also threw
to second attempting to head off
Musial. His high throw sailed into
center field as Banks took Dark's
throw of the original baseball and
tagged out Musial.
Cub centerfielder Bobby Thom-
son, taking catcher Taylor's wild
Throw, saw two baseballs in play
and tossed his toward the Cub
dugout, hoping to get rid of it.
Umpires Confer;
After a delay of about 10 min-
utes and two different conferences
between the four-man umpire
crew, it' was ruled that Musial was
out. Hemus promptly announced
the game was being played under
protest.
Umpire Delmore said the final
decision was based upon the fact
that Musial was tagged out by the
original baseball in play, despite
the apparent interference with it
by the bat boy. Hemus' protest
was based on the interference.
WOMEN'S
HAIRSTYLING
A SPECIALTY!!
. See Our Window
for the Latest Styles.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

I-M Notes

ON CAMPUS: A nice two room, fur-
nished, all utilities, private bath,
additional services. $80; with garage,
$88.50. NO 8-7234. 02
AT 1011 E. UNIVERSITY, student rooms.
For men at summer rates. Singles and
double. Phone after 5 P.M. NO 8-8681.
04
MISCELLANEOUS
FLYING PRIVATE PLANE to San Fran-
cisco and return by way of Denver-
next week, 5 days. Need passengers.
Ideal vacation. Phone MI 6-5397, Bir-
mingham, evenings. M9'
BUSINESS PERSONAL
MERRY ELLEN SCHOOL at 1706 Pauline
Blvd., Ann Arbor, invites you to en-
roll your emotionally disturbed, slow-
learning, or retarded child. Visit
school while still in session. Closing
July 1st. Telephone NO 3-3879. FF1
CAMPUS: 23 apartments, 2 houses,
modern, profitable. NO 2-1443. FF2

The I-M co-recreational pro-
gram will be held tonight at the
I-M Building from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
All the facilities of the building
are open, including the pool, bad-
minton courts, squash and hand-
ball courts, and the gymnastics
room. The gymnasium will also be
open for basketball.
S* s

Natalie Wood-the Teenagers' Teenager
Seldom has an actress been so popular
with audiences of all ages as Natalie

C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Fr~endly' service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
les. Warranted & guaranteed. See,
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
82

2007

W
x-Milwaukee 42
x-San Francisco 42
x-Los Angeles 43
x-Pittsburgh 38
Chicago 36
St. Louis '35
x-Cincinnati 32
x-Philadelphia 26

L
30
33
34
37
37
38
41
44

Pct.
.583
.560
.558
.507
.493
.479
.438
.3721

GB
1
5z
6 %
7i
10
15

WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
South State NO 2-3350
8I

I U

r

starting Wednesday, July 1st
HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
LONG
AN.MOVING

x-Played night game
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(See night game results below)
St. Louis 4, Chicago 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Chicago
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (N)
Only games scheduled.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
x-Cleveland 39 30 .565 -
x-Chicago 39 32 .549 1
x-Baltimore 38 34 .528 2
x-Detroit 37 36 .507 4
x-New York 36 35 .507 4
x-Washington 32 39 .451 8
x-Boston 31 39 .443 8Y
x-Kansas City 31 38 .449 8
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(See night game results below)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Baltimore (N)
Kansas"City at Detroit
Boston at Washington (N)
Chicago at Cleveland
Night Game results
San Fraicisco 2, Los Angeles 0
Cleveland 3, Chicago I
Detroit 4, Kansas City 0
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 5
Washington 6, Boston 1
New York 4, Baltimore 1

11

Phone Collect
Flint CEdar 4-1
For Lower
Interstate Rates

Flint 6, Michigan Bill
Stevens
686 Lit. '40
Free Estimates Manager
Every Friday

We own, operate, schedule and dispatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

I

1!

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA........... Mon.,
WILLIAM STEINBERG, Music Director

Feb. 29

"Ar's Reach"
Every time'you pull up to one of Kwik 'n Kleen's
two convenient auto service windows, you're just
an arm's reach from Ann Arbor's newest, most
fully equipped drive-in laundry and cleaners.
Here, from the driver's seat of your car, you can
transact all your laundry, shirt and dry cleaning
business . . . and in a matter of moments!
Automobile window service is offered continually
from 7:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. Monday through
Friday... and until 5:00 P.M. on Saturday.
Try it for your Summer wardrobe needs . .. You'll

I

RICHARD TUCKER ........ Fri., Nov.. 6
Metropolitan Opera tenor-number one in his field
today, returns for his second recital here.
PAMPLONA CHOIR
from Spain-.....-(230) Sun., Nov. 15
LUIS MORONDO directs this mixed chorus of a cappella
voices, in their second American tour.
JAN SMETERLIN ....... Tues., Nov. 24
Distinguished Polish pianist in his Ann Arbor debut.
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA ...........Mon., Feb. 8
ANTAL DOiAT1, Music Director
BACH ARIA GROUP .... .Tues., Feb. 16
Nine world-famous artists under direction of WILLIAM
H. SCHEIDE include JULIUS BAKER, ROBERT BLOOM,
EILEEN FARRELL, NORMAN FARROw, BERNARD
GREENHOUSE, JAN PEERCE, CAROL SMITH, PAUL.
ULANOWSKY, MAURICE WILK.

LAMOREUX ORCHESTRA
from Paris .......... .Thurs., Mar .24
IGOR MARKEVITCH, Music Director
TICKET INFORMATION
Orders for season tickets for either or both series are
now accepted, and will be filed in sequence. Orders will
be filed in sequence; and will be filled in the same order
and the tickets mailed September 21.
CHORAL UNION SERIES
$18.00 - Block A. Few remaining unclaimed
seats in the three center sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$15.00 - Block B. Two side sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$12.00 --Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$10.00-- Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13 rows.
EXTRA CONCERT SERI ES
$9.00 - Block A. Three center sections on both
Aunina n r i n Fira st Rnlr-nn ~.,rnn to ,-

t
7

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GIULIETTA 'SIMIONATO

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