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June 27, 1959 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1959-06-27

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SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THAEF1

atURAJN -a95 H IHG NDAL '( ?WU

1 ll VfL 1111 L L'
Now"

R

TOTAL $314,000:
Regents Accept Gifts, Grants, Bequests

GAYLORD - Gifts, grants and
bequests totaling $314,458.83 were
accepted by the Regents of the
,University, meeting at Hidden
Valley yesterday.
Largest sum was $171,627 from
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation,
Battle Creek, representing the
second and final payment on a
two-year commitment for a study
of hospital and medical economics
in Michigan, directed by Prof.
Walter J. McNerney of the busi-
ness administration school.
From the National Science
Foundation, Washington, D. C.,
the Regents accepted $69,047.50 for
summer fellowships for graduate
teaching assistants.
To Support Study
Ford Foundation, New York
City, has made a grant of $11,,875
in support of a study on the im-
pact of unemployment in the
1957-59 recession. This study will
be under the direction of Prof.
William Haber of the economics
department and Wilbur J. Cohen
of the social work school.
Additional support amounting,
to $8,662.50 was accepted from

Dow Chemical Company, Mid-
land, for research on insects be-
ing conducted by Henry K. Town-
es, a research associate in the
Museum of Zoology.
International Nickel Company,
Inc., New York City, has given
$8,220.83 to continue for the fifth
year a fellowship in the name of
the company.

Contribute to Scholarship
The Regents accepted $6,000
from John and Mary R. Markle
Foundation, New York City, for
the foundation's scholarship in
medical science.
There were two grants totaling
$5,800 from The William S. Mer-
rell Co., Cincinnati, with one of'
$3,800 for the company's fellow-
ship in pharmaceutical chemistryj
and one of $2,000 to establish a
fund for research in neurology
under the direction of Dr. Rus-
sell N. DeJong, chairman of the
medical school's neurology depart-
ment.
Foundation for Research on
human Behavior, Ann Arbor, has
given $5,000 in support of the 1959

sample survey of consumer atti-
tudes and expectations which will
be made by Prof. George Katona
of the psychology and economics
departments and the Survey Re-
search Center.
To Establish Fellowship
From Universal-Cyclops Foun-
dation, Bridgeville, Pa., the Re-
gents accepted $5,000 for a fel-
lowship in metallurgy.
From American Chemical Soci-
ety, Washington, D.C., the Re-
gents accepted $3,400 for contin-
uing support of research on the
thermal properties of hydrocar-
bons under the direction of Prof.
Donald L. Katz, chairman of the
Department of chemical and
chemical and metallurgical engi-
neering department.
A sum of $3;000 was accepted
from the estate of Anna E.
Schoen-Rene of New York City
for the Schoen-Rene fellowship.
List Grants
Continental Oil Company, Pon-
ca City, Okla., has given $3,000
for a fellowship in chemical engi-
neering.

I

_ F

S-
~EIUEFflt~.r
N I I DI t

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

LINES
2
3
4

,1 DAY
.80
.96
1.12

3 DAYS
2.00
2.40
2.80

6 DAYS
2.96
3.55
4.14

'I

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
LEARN TO PLAY Hammond Spinet or-
- gan. $15 per month,. includes lesson
in our studio. Rent a Spinet piano
of your own choice-$10 per month.
xi
PERSONAL
Morley:
It already is known the world over.
Bets
F7
URGENT: Want one 1959 Ensian, will
pay any reasonable price. NO 3-1531,
Ext. 297, 9-5 P.M. F6
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share spa-
cious S room apartment, with swim-
ming pool. $90 from now 'till Sept. 1.
NO 5-7356. Flo
BUSINESS SERVICES
FOR TODAY'S breakfast why not buy
some lox, cream cheese, bagels, onion
rolls, or assorted Danish pastry? Plan
ahead also . . . later in the week
we'll have smoked whitefish, gefitle
.fsh, kosher soups, pastrami, and
corned beef. Shop at Ralph's for these
delicious foods.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard N0$-3175
J5
TYPING: Thesis, Term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
J11
REWEAVING--Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J5
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S SKIP-dent and plisse short-
sleeve sport shirts. $1.39, 2 for $2.50.
Wash 'n Wear, sanforized, assorted
colors. Sam's Store. 122 E. Washing-
ton . W1

ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM and/or Board, excellent meals at
Tappan International 'House. Call Mrs.
Griffee at NO 5-5703. El
BOARDERS WANTED: Good food at
reasonable prices. Short walk from
campus. Call Hse. Mgr. -at NO 2-8312.
E2
BUSINESS PERSONAL
MERRY ELLEN SCHOOL at 1706 Pauline
Blvd., Ann Arbor, invites you to en-
roll your emotionally disturbed, slow-
learning, or retarded child. Visit
school while still in session. Closing
July 1st. Telephone NO 3-3879. FF1
CAMPUS: 23 apartments, 2 houses,
modern, profitable. NO 2-1443. FF2
USED CARS
'58 Volkswagen $1,645
Gasoline heaterl Immaculate!
Mich. European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N9
'59 VOLKSWAGEN. Sun roof. Call NO
3-8279. N10
FOR SALE: 1947 V.W. with custom fea-
tures. Excellent condition. NO 3-3893.
N
'59 RED TRIUMPH - Hardtop, soft-top,
W.W. tires, other extras. Dearborn,
LO 1-0069. - N4
TR 3 Triumph. Exceptional buy. All'
extras. NO 3-0857. N6
'56 OLDS cony., all power, white walls,
leather seats, new top, sharp. $1,395.
NO 2-1443. N5
1958 VOILKSWAGON, light gray, ex-
cellent condition. Best offer takes.
NO 3-1426. Ni
FORD, 1954 Custom V-8, Fordomatic.
Good condition, extras. NO 5-6886.
N2

FOR RENT
3 BEDROOM furnished.apt. for 4 girls
or 4 boys. Includes silver and dishes.
Tastefully decorated by interior dec-
orator. Convenient Liberty St. loca-
tion. $160 per month, including heat
and water. Phone NO 3-5098 evenings.
C19
APARTMENTS FOR 'RENT. "Furnished
or unfurnished," on and off campus
location, two bedroom, abundant
closet space, tiled bathroom and
shower, large living room, air-con-
ditioned if desired, birch kitchen,
closets and counters, Westinghouse
electric.rangerand refrigerator,'wash-
ers and driers. Tel. NO 2-7787. On
evenings and Sundays after 6, NO
5-6714 or NO 5-5515. C17
2 BDRM. apt. on istfloor. Stove, refrig.
Campus. $110 includes everything, NO
3-4747. C16
ROOMS FOR MEN: Quiet. Campus area.
Linens furnished. Low rent. NO 3-4747.
C1
SINGLE ROOM, private bath, linens,
near campus and hospital. NO 5-5605.
C13
FACULTY HOME, furnished, one year
beginning Sept. NO 3-6829 evenings.
C14
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. % block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. C12
FURNISHED: Campus apts., 1 or 2
bdrms. Boys, girls, families. Single
beds. Summer rates and fall rates.
344 S. Division. Also -caretaker apt.
C11
COOL COMFORT-Everything you want
in an Ann Arbor apaartment.
5 FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED ROOMS
T.V. * ** HI FI * ** Modern Kitchen
and Bath * * *Washing Machine
* * * Backyard and carport.
HURRY - Call NO 2-3036 after 5
This is the way to live.
C=
CAMPUS SPECIAL, summer rate, 5
room furnished apt., $75 including
utilities. NO 3-4322. C5
FURNISHED duplex, fine residential,
$75. 812 Pauline at 7th. NO 5-6268
after 5 P.M. or Pontiac FE 2-6681.
C7
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 2-1443. C1
ON CAMPUS: A nice two room, fur-
nished, all utilities, private bath,
additloial services. $80; with garage,
$88.50. NO 8-7234. C2
AT 1011 E. UNIVERSITY, student rooms.
For men at summer rates. Singles and
double. Phone after 5 P.M. NO 8-8681.
C4
HELP WANTED
SOFT BALL team needs 2 top pitchers,
excellent infielder, and hard hitting
outfielder to replace June grads. Call
Ted, NO 5-7639 evenings. H6
SUBJECTS NEEDED for Psych. experi-
ment, Wed., Thur., Fri., of next week,
7:30 to 9 p.m. $1 /hour. Come to the
tryouts Tues. evening at 7:30 p.m.
in Aud. A. of Angell Hall. Native
speakers of English only. H4
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 8. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
S2
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
S1

A summer fellowship in chem-
istry will be provided with $3,000
given by Union Carbide Chemicals
Company, a division of Union
Carbide Corporation, Research
Department, South Charleston,
West Va.
A total of $3,000 was accepted
from three donors for the Sum-
mer Youth Fitness Program. The
donors were: Mrs. Harry Tows-
ley, $1,500; Joseph H. Buhr, $500;
and C. H. Simmons, $1,000. All
are from Ann Arbor.-
Six-Week Program
The program is under the di-
rection of Prof. Paul Hunsicker
of the education school, and will
run for six weeks this summer
involving boys from 7 to 14. In
addition to a program of condi-
tioning exercises for the boys, the
program will provide training for
prospective teachers of physical
education.
National Electronics Conference,
Inc., Chicago, has given $2,500 for
a fellowship.
A grant of $2,000 towards pub-
lication of a manuscript by Prof.
Hans Kurath of the English de-
partment on the pronunciation of
English in the Atlantic states was
accepted from American Council
of Learned Societies, New York
City.
Lions Contribute
The Regents accepted $1,300
from the Michigan Lions Eye
Bank, Ann Arbor, for the Michi-
gan Eye Collection Center.
Surgical research , under the
direction of Dr. Charles G. Child
III, chairman of the medical
school's surgery department, will
be supported with a grant of
$1,250 from Parke, Davis & Com-
pany, Detroit. The Regents also
accepted a second Parke Davis
grant of $625 for a fellowship in
pharmacy.
Two Michigan newspapers have
given a total of $1,170 for the
University Press Club Foreign
Journalism Fellowships. The Bat-
tle Creek Enquirer and News has
given $780 to support an intern
fellowship on that newspaper by
Horacio P. Marull, Grad., of Chile
'while the Port Huron Times-
Herald has given $390 for an
intern fellowship by Ken-ichi Sa-
saki, Grad., of Japan.
Donate Gifts
Square D Company, Detroit,
has given $1,000 for a scholarship.
From Reynolds Metals Com-
pany, Richmond, the Regents ac-
cepted $1,000 for the Faculty Re-
search Fund in Personnel Admin-
istration.
Other gifts, grants and bequests
of $100 or more included those
from L. D. Caulk Company, Mil-
ford, Del., $700 for research in
restorative dental material un-
der the direction of Dr. Floyd A.
Peyton, of the dental school and
W. L. Badger and Associates, Inc.,
Ann Arbor, $675 for the Walter
L. Badger Memorial Loan Fund
in Engineering.
Give Funds for Loans
Included in the list were those
from the Della Noble estate, Oak-
land County, $611 for the Della
M. Noble Loan Fund; the Michi-
gan Heart Association, Detroit,
$600 for a summer medical student
fellowship and the Detroit Insti-
tute of Physical Medicine and Re-
habilitation, Detroit, $550 to es-
tablish the Max Karl Newman
Scholarship Award in Physical
Medicine and Rehabilitation.
From Westinghouse Education
Foundation, Pittsburgh, came $500
for an achievement scholarship in
business administration with R..
C. Mahon Foundation, Detroit,
giving $500 for the foundation's'
engineering scholarship.
The Arjay R. and Frances F.1
Miller Foundation, Dearborn, gave
$500 for the Edgar Kahn Neuro-!
surgery Fund.

'u' Museum
To Display
City's Plans
"The City in Transition: De-
troit Plans Its Future" is the
theme of a display which will
open Monday and can be seen
through Aug. 9 on the main floor
of the Museum of Art.
The formal opening of the ex-
hibit, presented under the aus-
pices of the University's summer
lecture series, "Modern Man Looks
Forward," will be held from 3:30
to 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Mu-
seum with Detroit city officials
and civic leaders attending.
The exhibition has been ar-
ranged in cooperation with the
Detroit City Planning Commission
to show how the city is seeking to
plan its future. Charles Blessing,
director of the commission, will be
panel member in the second lec-
ture series presentation, Monday
evening.
Shows Planning Problems
The exhibition focuses on the
problems of planning in Detroit's
central business district, with
particular emphasis on the Civic
Center and Convention Mall.
In addition to the models,
sketches and plans supplied by
the commission and the Report
and Information Committee, the
display includes a section of pro-
jected studies of sections of the
selected area by a group of archi-
tects working on the problem.
Essential to a planning project
of the type illustrated is a co-
operative effort on the part of the
city administration, commercial
and industrial interests and civic
leaders to resolve the complex
problems involved in large-scale
and long-range city planning.
Complexities Outlined
- These problems include land
holdings and their use, slum clear-
ance and relocation, the financing,
engineering and architectural
studies necessary to implement
them.
Material illustrating the histor-
ical background of the area pre-
sented in the exhibit has been
supplied by Clements Library, the
Burton Collection, the Detroit
Public Library, the Detroit His-
torical Society and the Detroit
Institute of Arts.
Discussions
Scheduled
Two lectures in the summer
schedule are being presented in
the next threedays.
"Problems of Rural Develop-
ment in Southeast Asia" will be
the topic for discussion when
L. A. Peter Gosling, of the geog-
raphy department, opens the an-
nual summer lecture series of the
First Unitarian Church at 8 p.m.
tomorrow at the church.
The lecture is open to the pub-
lic and a discussion period will
follow.
The second conference lecture
for teachers of English will be
held at 4 p.m. Monday in Aud. C,
Angell Hall. A panel of four will
discuss the question of "What
Constitutes Adequate Preparation
for College English?"
Members of the panel are Nelle
A. Driese, of Fordson High School,
Detroit; Ray MacLoughlin, of
Trenton High School; Nicholas

Schreiber, principal of Ann Ar-
bor High School and Prof. Wil-
liam Steinhoff, chairman of the
freshman English program at the
University.

By THOMAS P.WHITNEY
Associated Press Foreign News Analyst
The Russians, determined to
have greater knowledge and ex-
perience in operations in the Arctic
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Seminar in Mathematics Statistics.
Organization meeting Tues., June 30, 12
noon in 3020 Angell Hall.
Groups learning to read mathemati-
cal papers in Russian meet in Rm. 3014
Angell Hall Tues. and Fri. at 1 p.m.
Placement Notices
Personnel Requests:
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence,
R. I. Three college graduates who
would fit into a year and a half to two
yr. Management Development Train-
ing Program. Would prefer grad. of
about three years ago, in Engrg., Bus.
Ad., Cost Accounting or Industrial
Management.
The Terry Steam Turbine Co., Hart-
ford, Conn. Recent graduate with a
power plant or Mech. Engrg. back-
ground who has had some education
or experience in the maring field,
Raymond Bag Corp., Middletown, O.
Project Engr. B.S.M.E.; 23-30 yrs. old;
Some design experience desirable; draft
exempt.
Radford College, Radford, Va. Direc-
tor of Public Relations. Young man or
woman with a major in Journalism or
with adequate experience writing for
a newspaper.
Diamond Alkali Co., Cleveland, Ohio.
Sales training program, beginning July
13. Particularly interested in men with
Bus. Ad. background who have taken
chemistry to meet their science credit
requirement.
E. W. Bliss Co., Canton, Ohio. Recent
Accounting major.
The Osborn Mfg. Co., Cleveland, O.
Chemist or Chem. Engr. to fill a va-
cancy in their Research and Develop-
ment Dept. Desire man with a mini-
mum of three yrs. experience in the
polymer and elastomer field. Prefer
someone under 35 yrs. of age.
U. S. Civil Service Examiners for the
V. A. Hospital inBattle Creek, Mich.,
give notice that the closing date for
receipt of applications for Library Asst.
and Ocupational Therapy Aid is June
30, 1959.
State- of Michigan announces the
exams for: Child Guidance Psychia-
trist, Pediatrician, Physician, Psychia-
trist, Public Health Epidemiologist,
Sanatorium Physician, Dentist.
City of Detroit Civil Service an-
nounces examinations for: Technical
Aid, Calculating Machine Operator,
Jr. Accountant, Jr. Social Economist,
Communicable Disease Nurse, General
Staff Nurse, General Staff Nurse (Re-
lief), Head Hospital Nurse, Supervisor
of Hospital Nurses, Posting Machine
Operator.
The following companies need En-
gineers:
Curtiss-Wright Corp., Utica, Mich.:
Chem. Engrs. B.S.
Pennsalt Chemicals Corp., Wyandotte,
Mich.: Chem. Engrs.
General Electric Co., Edmore, Mich.:
Product Development. B.S. or M.S. in
Mech. Engrg.
Illinois Tool Workers, Elgin, Ill.:
Sales Engrg.
H. K. Porter Co., Detroit, Mich.: Pro-
duction, Engineering, Sales. B.S. in
Mech. or Ind.
Reed Research Inc., Wash., D.C.: Ap-
plied Mechanics, Classical Physics, Ap-
plied Math. Ph.D. in June preferred.
M.S. who have continued or intend to
continue with grad. school will be con-
sidered.
Rockwell-Standard Corp., Allegan,
Mich.: Mech. Engrg. B.S.M.E.
Borg-Warner Corp., Chicago, Ill.: In-
dustrial Engrg. Trainee with B.S. in
Bus. Ad. or Liberal Arts. Sales Engrg.
Trainee. B.S. with training in technical
fields.
Raytheon Co., Newton, Mass.: Prod-
uct Design Engrs. Jr. and Sr. Engr.
with B.S.E.E. or B.S. in Physics.
The Nestle Co., White Plains, N. Y.:
Chem. Engrg. B.S. in Chem. Engrg.
Anchor Hocking Glass Corp., Lan-
caster, Ohio: Machine Design. B.S.M.E.
and Chemist or Chem. Engrg.
P. R, Mallory & Co. Inc., Indianapo-
lis, Ind: Engrg. Trainee with B.S.E.E.
or M.E,; Jr. Engrg. with B.S. in Chem.
or Met.; Jr. Engr. with B.S.E.E.
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich.:
Graduate Trainees with B.S. or M.S.
in Mech. Engrg., Physics, Chem. Engrg.,
or Engrg. Mech.
For further information concerning
any of the above positions, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

Ocean than any other power, are
continuing intensive and extensive,
research and exploration in the
Arctic.
The Soviet Union's chief com-.
petitors in Arctic exploration are
Americans and Canadians, who
work in close cooperation.
At present, the Russians are
preparing to replace Soviet per-
sonnel on one "ice-island" research
station-NP-6-which has been in
operation for three years. /
Personnel from another floating
research station-NP-7-have just
been removed and a new station
will be laid down in the near fu-
ture.
Weather Stations
To supplement these manned
stations, the Russians are prepar-
ing to set out 25 automatic weath-
er stations with radio transmitters
to send back periodic reports.'
in Leningrad, the Soviet Union's
new Arctic research and develop-
ment weapon - the atomic ice-
breaker Lenin-has been undergo-
ing tests prior to joining the big
Soviet icebreaker fleet later this
year.
Both the United States and Rus-
sia now have one manned research
station at work. Russia's is NP-6
and the United States' is Bravo.
The United States, which evacu-
ated one-Alpha-last November,
plans to lay another one down
soon. It will be called Alpha 2.
The air search for research sta-
tion sites started with the return
of daylight to the Arctic recently.
Stations must be established be-
fore slush prevents landing planes.
Support Units'
Once ice islands capable of sup-
porting the research stations are
found, personnel and equipment
are moved in and drift generally

from above Alaska and opposite
Russia to the Greenland Sea.
While floating on their ice is-
lands, the research stations study
ice formation, the ocean floor,
ocean currents, as well as weather
and upper air phenomena.
The Russian newspaper Pravda
claimed recently that in the last
10 years soundings of the depth of
the Arctic Ocean have been taken
by Russians in more than 600
locations.
Since .1937, when the Russians
put out their first expedition
headed by Ivan Papanin to drift
on the Arctic ice, they have
claimed to lead the world in Arctic
exploration.
But one field in which they def-
initely have fallen behind the
United States is in underwater
polar exploration-carried out by
United States nuclear submarines
which cruise freely beneath the
icecap.
The Russians apparently have
no nuclear submarines in service.
Registrations
Show Gain
The number of college and high
school graduates returning to
classes keeps increasing, as do the
courses offered by the Division of
Adult Education of the Univer-
sity and Wayne State University.
During the past year, the first
in which the Division operated
with support from both universi-
ties, course registrations num-
bered over 5,000, according to Di-
rector Hamilton Stillwel's tally.
Of these, 3,000 registrations
were for classes never before of-
fered for adults by either insti-
tution, he said.

Russians Continue Intensive Research,
In Race for Knowledge of Arctic Ocean

STARTING
TODAY

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DIAL
NO 2-2513

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DEBBIE
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CONTINUOUS
SAT. & SUN.A
FROM 1 P.M.
ENDING TONIGHT
"

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4r
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"

DIAL
NO 8-6416

CURT JURGENS
IN
IIRCUS OF LOVE"

-I

STARTING SUNDAY
HEMS OSHERO, OF WORLD WAR IU!,
Startling
story of*
the British}
spy who
fooled Hitler,
the whole
German Army
-and even
the girl in,
his arms!
JACK HAWKINS

CONFERENCE ON AGING:
Faculty Member Receives
National Committee Positi0n
Wilma Donahue, chairman of
the University's Division of Ger- Ann Arbor, director of the United
ontology, is one of four Michigan Auto Workers' Older and Retired
residents who have been appoint- Workers Department, and Dr
ed to the National Advisory ,Com- Frederick C. Swartz, chairman of
mittee for the 1961 White House the American Medical Associa-
Conference on Aging. tion's Committee on Aging. The
The other three are John B. appointments were announced in

Martin, chairman of the Michi-
gan State Legislative Advisory
Committee on Problems of the
Aging, with headquarters at the
University; Charles E. Odell of

I

CONTI NUOUS
DAILY from 1 P.M.

i z

DIAL
NO 2-3136

Washington by Arthur S. Flem-
ming, Secretary of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare.
The White House conference
will be held Jan. 9-13, 1961. The
discussions will range over a Va-
riety of topics that will include
population, socio-economic
trends, income maintenance and
inflation, employment security
and retirement, health and medi-
cal care,
Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to off i-

ROBERT
.
"
4
. HIGH-IDEUTY
STEREOPHONIC
SOUND
.r RAY WAISTON

PS
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SAY I W 0T

ENDING TONIGHT-

-4

SUSAN HAYWARD JEFF CHANDLER
in "THUNDER IN THE SUN"
LATE SHOW 11 P.M.
STARTING SUNDAY
From the passion-dipped pen

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MICHIGAN UNION

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