100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 26, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

TILE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

It RIDXY, JUNE 26. 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. JTJNF. 2~ Th~B

.A.. s.Ma4Y<:Vd V RJA'1 i:f NVt . 4P4l

'urlough, Non-Furlough Retirements of 44
'acuity Members Announced by 'U' Regents

12 STATES, 24 MILLION PEOPLE:

African States Experiment with French Community

Retirement furlough will begin
this summer and fall for 18 Uni-
versity faculty members with a
total of 538 years of service to the
University.,
Retirement furlough marks the
end of regular classroom work
and research activities at the
University. Faculty members re-
ceive their regular academic sal-
ary during retirement furlough,
which is considered a year of con-
sultantship to the University.
Those scheduled to begin fur-
lough during June and July, and
their years of service, are: Prof.
George B. Brigham, of the archi-
tecture college, 29 years; Prof.
James E. Dunlap, of the classical
studies department, 40 years and
Prof. Henry C. Eckstein, of the
biological chemistry department,
36 years.
Egly To Retire
Also included are Prof. William
H. Egly, of the engineering college
English department, 40 years; As-
sistant Dean Walter J. Emmons,
secretary of the engineering col-
lege and member of the civil en-
gineering department faculty, 32
years; Dean Albert C. Fursten-
berg, of Medical School and pro-
fessor of otolaryngology, 41 years,
and Prof. L. Clayton Hill of the
business administration school, 11
years.
Beginning their retirement fur-
loughs will be Prof. Hirsch Hoot-
kins, of the romance languages
department and examiner in for-
eign languages for the graduate
school, 39 years and Prof. Edwin
B. Mains, director of the Univer-
sity Herbarium and member of
the botany department faculty,
29 years.

Included in the roster are As- Also included are Prof. Eliza-
sistant Dean Walter V. Marshall, beth C. Crosby, of the anatomy
of the architecture college, 34 department, 38 years; Prof. Felix
years; Samuel W. McAllister, as- G. Gustafson, of the botany de-
sociate director of the University partment, 38 years; Prof. Russell
Libraries, 28 years, and Dean 1C. Hussey, of the geology depart-
Henry F. Vaughan, of the public ment, 38 years and Prof. Hugh E.
health school and chairman of Keeler, of the mechanical engi-
the public health practice depart- neering department, 42 years.
ment, 18 years. Lay Retired
Six Others Set Others who have retired include
Retirement without furlough Prof. Walter E. Lay, of the me-
will begin for six faculty members chanical engineering department,
during the coming year. 39 years; Prof. Burke Shartel, of
Those retiring in June are Prof. the law school, 38 years; Prof.
Walter J. Gores of the architec- Fred B. Wahr, of the Germanic
ture college, 30 years; Prof. languages department, 45 years;
George G. Ross, of the architec- Prof. Arthur E. Woodhead, of the
ture college, 20 years and Prof. zoology department, 34 years and
Benjamin W. Wheeler, of the his- Ray L. Fisher, supervisor in physi-
tory department and faculty cal education and baseball coach,
counselor for special programs in 37 years.
the literary college, 35 years. Recently-retired University per-
Prof. Laurie E. Campbell, of sonnel also include Ethel A. Mc-
the education school and director Cormick, social director of wo-
in physical education in the men, Office of the Dean of
physical education and athletics Women, 38 years; Herbert G.
department, 34 years and Pearl Watkins, secretary and assistant
L. Kendrick, resident lecturer in vice-president of the University,
epidemiology, eight years, will re- 32 years; Prof. Julio del Toro, of
tire in August. the romance languages depart-
Clark To Start ment, 42 years and Prof. William
Prof. Albert L. Clark, Jr., of the
engineering college, 34 years, will
retire in December.
Faculty members who began re-
tirement furlough or retired di- D
rectly during the last school year
included Prof. Bradley M. Patten,
chairman of the anatomy depart-
ment, 22 years; Prof. Charles F. The Daily Official Bulletin is an
Remer, of the economics depart- official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
ment, 30 years and Prof. John C. Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
Brier, 28 years, and Prof. Leo L. torial responsibility. Notices should
Carrick, 13 years, both of the en- se sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
CarrckRoom 3519 Administration Build-
gineering college chemical engi- ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
neering department. publication. Notices for Sunday

I

A. Paton, an Edwin Francis Gay
university professor of account-
ing and of economics, 43 years.
Simes Ends Career
Others are Prof. Lewis M.
Simes, a Floyd Russell Mechem
university professor of law, 26
years, and Prof. Harlow O.
Whittemore, chairman of the ar-
chitecture college landscape ar-
chitecture department and direc-
tor of Nichols Arboretum, 44
years.
In addition, Prof. Verner W,
Crane of the history department,
42 years; Prof. Z. Clark Dickin-
son, of the economics department,
35 years; Prof. Elmer D. Mitchell,
chairman of the physical educa-
tion program for men, 41 years,
and Prof. Ruth Wanstrom, of the
pathology department, 27 years,
have retired.
Others are Prof. Charles B..
Gordy of the industrial engineer-
ing department, 31 years; Prof.
Ermelindo A. Mercado, of the ro-
mance languages department, 39
years, and Prof. Dean E. Hobart
of the engineering drawing de-
partment, 28 years.

IAL BULLETIN

11

,

'1

MUSIC MOPS

--CAMPUS-
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN-
U0S E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

for the Finest in Recorded Music
- s
- ~WHITE
$095 %a
VAN BOVEN SHOES
* * 17 Nickels Arcade

Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 1959
VOL. LXIX, NO. 4-S
General Notices
The following student-sponsored so-
cial events have been approved for the
coming weekend. Social chairmen are
reminded that requests for approval
for social events are due in the Office
of Student Affairs not later than 12
o'clock noon on Tuesday prior to the
event.
June 26: Couzens Hall and Wenley
Hall.
Graduate Students expecting to re-
ceive the master's degree in Aug. 1959,
must file diploma application with the
Recorder of the school by Fri., June 26.
A student will not be recommended
for a degree unless he has filed formal
application in the office of the Gradu-
ate School
Concerts
Student Recital: William Lecklider,
clarinet, in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree Master of
Music (Wind Instruments) in Aud. A,
Angell Hall, Fri., June 26, 8:30 p.m.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Roger
Frederick Klemm, Chem.; thesis: "The
Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposi-
tion of Methyl Iodide in the Presence
of Toluene," Fri., June 26. 3003 Chem.
Bldg., at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, R. B.
Bernstein.
Placement Notices
Consumers Power Co., Jackson, Mich.
Copywriter in their Advertising Dept.
Would be interested in anyone with a
B.A. in English, Speech, Advertising or
Journalism.
Organization in Ann Arbor. Civil En-
gineer, will involve design work and
construction. Man with a B.S. in Civil
Engrg. Prefer June grad. or someones
with little experience.
Hardware Mutuals, Detroit, Mich.
Men for Sales in the Detroit area. Age:
25-35, marired, some college degree pre-
ferred.
Structural Products, Inc., Charlotte,
Mich. Administrative Asst. to the Sales
Manager. Male; 21-27 years old; B.S. or
B.A. degree; admin. training in college
or previous admin. experience; and
drafting or training in art desirable.
Firm in Highland Park Area. Labora-
tory Engineer in Chemistry Group. Man
with degree or Working toward one in
Chem. or Chem. Engrg. Would like
man with a degree, but not necessary
if has equivalent in experience. Wil].
consider a foreign student if he has
gear experience.
Barry Laboratories, Inc.,. Detroit,
Mich., Laboratory Technician for vac-
cine work. Man or woman with A.B. in
Bacteriology preferably. Knowledge of
allergy products desirable, but, not es-
sential.

City of Detroit, Mich., announces ex-
amination for Student Technical Asst.
(Pre-Social Work) Application must be
filed before June 30, 1959. There is also
a need for Stenographers, Typists, Jr.
Stenographers, Jr. Typists, and Sr.
Stenographers.
Armstrong, Lancaster, Pa. Non-Tech-
nical Sales; Accounting, Advertising,
Promotion and Public Relations, Cer-
amic Engrg. - Development, Ceramic
Engrg.E-Sales, Chem. Engrg. - Re-
search, Chemist - Doctorate, Chem-
ists or Chem. Engrs. - Production,
Chemists - Research, Engrs., Plant
Engrs., Industrial Engrs., Personnel and
Production Planning.
Executive Manpower Corp., N.Y.C.
Technical Service Man, Asst. Personnel
Manager. Qualifications and descrip-
tions are on file at the Bureau.
Organization in Flint Area. Prefer
someone who has had some experience
such as working on a newspaper or
writin gradio news. It is a writing job.
Like someone with two yrs. experience,
but will consider outstanding student
graduating this semester.
Ott Chemical Co., Muskegon, Mich.
Graduate in Analytical Chemistry.
Would be responsible for the estab-
lishment of procedures for the analy-
sis of both regular and developmental
products.
The following companies need hngi-
neers:
Hercules Powder Co., Harbor Beach,
Mich: Chemical Engrg.
The Joe Martin Co., Detroit, Mich
Draftsman or Architectural Engineers.
Borg Warner Corp, Kalamazoo, Mich.:
Electrical and Mech. Engrs.
Gray Stamping & Afg. Co., Plano,
Illinois: Mechanical Engr.
Dayton Associates, Dayton, Ohio:
Sales Engr. with B.S.E.E. or equiv. in
Physics and exp. in Radar.
Texaco, Inc., Chicago, Ill.: Industrial
Lubricant Sales, Operations Engr.
American Broach, Ann Arbor, Mich.,
Designer with B.S.M.E. - U. S. citizen.
Narmco, Inc., San Diego, Calif., Ma-
terials Research Engr.
Combustion Engineering, Inc., Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.; Metallurgical Engr.
Consolidated Paper Co., Monroe,
Mich.: Research and Development. B.S.
or M.S. in Chem. Engrg.
Chevrolet Willow Run, Ypsilanti,
Mich.: Electrical Engr.
Reynolds Metals to., Richmond, Va.:
Mining Engr.
Chris-Craft Corp., Salisbury, Md.:
Plant and Industrial Engr.
Consulting Engineer, St. Joseph,
Mich.: Associate Editor with Engrg.
degree.
Illinois Tool Works, Elgin, Ill.: Sales'
Engr.
Atlantic Refining Co., Philadelphia,
Pa.: Operations Research Engr.
David Taylor Modle Basin, Wash.,
D. C.: Electrical Engr. .
Air Moving & Conditioning, Detroit:
Asst. Staff Engr.
Wright Air Development, Dayton,
Ohio: Industrial Engrs.
Industrial Tectonics, Ann Arbor:
Sales Engr. Mech., Indust., Metall.
Wolverine Plastics, Milan, Mich.:j
Mech. or Electrical Engr.
Kroger Co., Cincinnati, Ohio: Man-
agement Trainees with Engrg. Degrees.
Keiser & Co., Inc., Toledo, Ohio.: In-
dustrial Sales Trainee.
Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, Detroit,
Mich.: Mech. Engrgs.
Worthington Corp., Harrison, N. J.:
Research & Development, Sales, Ap-
plication, Design.
Hawaiian Telephone Co., Honolulu,
Hawaii: Hawaia students with B.S.E.E.
Marion Power Shovel Co., Marion,
Ohio: Mech. and Electrical Engrs.
For further information concerning
any of the above positions, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

By GEORGE MARTHUR
BRAZZAVILLE, Congo Repub-
lic (AP)-A hazardous political ex-
periment, less than a year old, is
making itself felt in the dark
vastness of French Africa where
men still scratch the soil with
stone age tools.
The experiment is the French
Community, a cooperative of 12
semi-independent states and some
24 million Africans, most of whom
are illiterate and ignorant of all
but the old tribal ways.
The hazard is that these vola-
tile people will be pressured into
full independence-which is freely
offered them - before stagnant
economies can be brought to life
and education dispels ignorance.
Demanded Freedom
It was little more than a' year
ago when these same areas were
on the verge of angrily demand-
ing full independence from the
Fourth French Republic before it
collapsed of its own indecision.
Then came Gen. Charles de Gaulle,
an almost mystical figure to
French Africa, with his offer of
membership in the community or
independence for the asking. Only
one state, Guinea, chose inde-
pendence.
Since then, the atmosphere in
French Africa has literally been
transformed. Chief reason: Many
African leaders have since taken
their first deep economic look at
their homelands.
"Everything that comes to mar-
ket here comes on the head of a
woman," a politician in the Congo
Republic moaned. "That's the size
of our economic problem."
French Africa is being dragged
out of the Stone Age, often re-
luctantly, by a handful of men
with their eyes on the future. All
are French - educated, at once
idealists and realists.
Transitional Step
They view the French Com-
munity as a welcome transition1
step toward independence from1
which might grow a sort of French
Commonwealth of Nations, with1
everyone fast friends. The problemc
is to keep this spirit moving with-
out letting the boat get swamped
by an outside wave or run agroundc
on the rocks of internal dissen-
sion.1
Ever ready to step in with a
swarming wave are the Commu-
nists.;
Marxism comes naturally to
Africans. Their society is mainly
communal and authoritarian.i
Many African leaders were Com-
munists during student days in
Europe. Most have retained their
lean to the left.
But, despite this evident Red
tinge, African leaders have no
hankering to swap a colonial boss
for another foreign boss. They
share a common determination to
be "African."
Not Only Solution
"They tried to tell us that the
Russians had the only solution,"
Ivory Coast strongman Felix Hou-
phouet-Boigny, a onetime Com-
munist said. "My choice dates
from that. We had to seek a new
way."
"We will never enslave ourselves
to anyone," Sekou Toure, who
runs independent Guinea along
Marxist lines, declared. "We are
neutralists. Events in Hungary,
Iraq or Tibet don't interest us."
Any massive effort in Africa
would pose tremendous problems
for the Reds. Its economic needs
are staggering. Over the long
haul, no Russian program could
match the substantial over - all
program of France.
Independent Sttes
Of far more importance to
French Community leaders are
the independent states of Ghana
and Guinea; and Togoland, Ni-
geria and The Cameroons, which
will become independent next
year.

I

{ ~' }i -_______________
t. '?L

m

. . . . . .
French Community
.adepandent 1960
lhdependent
'Colonies

MADAASCAR

'r

j ieat ure

_.. .

\11

With interlocking tribal lan-
guages all but erasing frontiers,
the contest between the idea of
independence versus the idea of
the community will be a day-to-
day concern.
If the independent states make
more progress than those in the
community, their leaders can claim
with some justification: "Ours is
the way. Your own leaders led you
astray."
Up to their ears in this contest
are Toure, Houphouet-Boigny, the
scholarly poet Leopold Senghor of
Senegal and Kwame Nkrumah of
Ghana, who has tied his country
in a loose union with Guinea.
Sniping Strategy
The Toure-Nkrumah axis has
already given an idea of its strat-
egy-sniping at the community,
branding it colonial and crusading
for a United States of Africa.
The germ of internal dissension
in the community is more subtle.
Houphouet - Boigny sees the
community as. an almost finished
DAL NO 2-.2513
ENDS
FRIDAY
a }NOW.--.
4 FOR
EVERYONE
TO SEE
AND ENJOY!
A magnificent
NEW
S Motiont Picture
WALT DSEWS
KCHMRAMMe
T2CHNICOLOR.
i lM ormsutsoN CO. "C
4 .:
The GioriIus IAuS'C ol
tchaIkO'skY and FMIV
DeihflSong is "
ALSO DISNEY'S
"GRAND CANYON"
Academy Award Winner
Starts Saturday

product. He jvenly admits hej
would allow no political party in
the Ivory Coast campaign for in-,
dependence.
He wants to build the commu-
nity into a tight federation with
France as a partner, equal but
not superior to the African states.
He implies that the idea of the
French Community was as much1
his as de Gaulle's.
His rival Senghor sees the com-

munity as a step on the road to
independence. He first wants West
Africa united into a federation
called Mali, then, with France,
into a commonwealth of fully
independent members with trade
and cultural ties.
Senghor says: "Too bad about
Houphouet-he has been passed
by events."
Houphouet says: "My friend
Senghor is a good poet, but.. ."

t

1

I

MONTH-END
Early Birds get Best Buys!
for wear now and seasons to come

I I

'1

All Spring Woolat
(oats and Suits '/2

One group
Belter Dresses
of all kinds, sizes.
originally
19.95 to 49.95

originally
29.95 to 69.95
7-15 . .

OFF

I

10-44

...122-24%2

~1

tal 10-20

Group of
Better Dresses
and Handbags
sale 7.00

Sportswear groups
and separates,
slacks, jackets,
blouses, skirts,
sweaters
at 1/2 Off'
and below

Af
:A

TODAY
and
Saturday

!

DIAL
NO 8-6416

The following schools have
(Continued on Page 4)

listed

to
ORCHESTRA-TYPE MUSIC
every night of the week
with our newly installed
STEREOPHONIC JUKE BOX
Come out and see this Completely Remodeled Club
FLOOR SHOWS
every FRIDAY and SATURDAY NIGHTS

DIAL NO2-3136
ENDING SATURDAY
NEVER HAS THE
WESTERN SUN BLAZED
ON SO HOT. BLOODED,
SO SAVAGE A SAGA!
brilliant in her first role since
"I Want To Live"
at his roughest and rawest.

Groups of Dresses of all kinds,
handbags, better jewelry,
long bras, better. blouses
All Hats orig. 10.95 to 16.95
sale 5.00

1

j=

at our

t

11

I

ON FOREST
off S. University
Opposite
Campus Theatre
Parking at Rear

Ca mpus
Togs
1111 South U.

BING CROSBY
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
BOB WAGNER in
"SAY ONE FOR ME"

I

--------------

i .... .j%.<.12... . . . . . ............... . . .
MICHIGAN UNION
11 CAMPIT MIXER

-1

DEMMIL ANPRIEW

:I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan