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June 23, 1959 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:V

JU7NE 23.1959

TRY, MTE7Wi

AT"?V

New Center'si
Get Approval

Requirements for admission
and graduation from the Business
Administration and Engineering
Divisions of the University's Dear-
born Center have been approved
by the Regents.
The Regents also have formal-
ized the "senior unit" status of
the Dearborn Center since the
admission requirements call for
the completion of the first two
years of college work before a stu-
dent can begin studies at the
Dearborn Center.
The Regents also approved the
Dearborn Center's use of the
quarter system of four terms each
year with each term being the
equivalent of two-thirds of a se-
mester at Ann Arbor.
Co-op Program
Graduation requirements in
business and engineering call for
participation in the co-operative
work-study program with alter-
nate terms spent on campus and
on specific work assignments in
industryand business.
For the Business Administra-
tion Division, six 12-week terms
will be spent in campus study and
five terms on work assignments.
Programs in mechanical and elec-
trical engineering (these will be
the initial areas of instruction in
engineering) will require seven
terms in the classroom and six in
industry.
Entrance requirements for the
Business Administration Division
call for 60 semester credit hours
(90 terms credit hours) "of satis-
factory record" completed in any
accredited college or university.
Degree Requirements
To receive a degree of Bachelor
of Business Administration, it will
be necessary to complete an ad-
ditional 90 term credit hours of
work at the Dearborn Center. Re-
quired courses will include ac-
counting, finance, statistics, man-
agement, industrial r'e 1 a t i o n s,
marketing, economics of enter-
prise and business law.
For admission to either of the
two engineering programs, it will
be necessary to present 62 credit
hours (93 term credit hours) of
s a t i s f a c to r y work although
"quality and level of attainment
reached by the student" are even
more important than . the total
number of credit hours acquired.
For a Bachelor of Science in
Engineering (industrial engineer-
ing) degree, 199 additional term
credit hours at Dearborn Center

Requirements
of 'U'Regents
are required. The required courses
include engineering mechanics,
English, mathematics, business
administration courses and
courses in industrial, mechanical,
chemical and metallurgical and
electrical engineering. There will
' be 10 hours of non-technical elec-
tives.
Engineering Credits
For a Bachelor of Science in
Engineering (mechanical engi-
neering) degree, 115 additional

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Dean, Two Lecturers To Retire
Che public health school will "went contributor to textbooks
e three noted specialists in Service. At present, the school dealing with disease prevention,
field, including Dean Henry with its laboratories and equip- Hygiene and public health.
Vaughan, first dean of the ment represents an investment of Presently executive director of
ooluwhntheyir etre ths over $5 million. Its annual budget the testing laboratory of the Na-
001, when they retire this ovr$ ilo.Isana ugttional Sanitation Foundation, lo-
nth. is $2 million and it employs ap- ti ite unripulic
The others are Pearl L. Ken- proximately 250 persons, includ- ealth school. Tiedean wil bc
ck, a pioneer in work on the g scientists and teachers.ote his time following retirement
vention of whooping cough Professionally, Vaughan prob- o the position of consultant to
e at laboratories in Grand ably has gained greatest recogni- he oition.
pids and Walter D. Tiedeman, tion for initiating the "medical 'he organization.
international authority on work in Detroit." The plan is or-
d and milk control. ganized to allow private physi-
knn Arbor's Town Club was cians to provide community-wide r4 Se
site for a dinner held in their protective services against tuber-
nor June 6. Earlier in the culosis, smallpox, whooping cough {o Take our
nth, Vaughan and Tiedeman and polio.
eived scrolls of appreciation Vaughan has served on a num- P=Kf. Walter A. Reichart, of the
their contributions to the field ber of commissions and commit.
environmental health, present- tees of the United States Public Germanic languages department,
to them by representatives of Health Service and for many yeas Lwill make a four-week study tour
r Michigan Sanitarian Associ- was a member of the National Ad DEAN HENRY VAUGHN of Germany, beginning this
ons visory Health Council. . . to retire month.
Former Dean's Son As a member of a group of pro-

The University will act as host
to a Summer Institute for High
School Teachers of, Mathematics,,
to be held Monday through Aug.9.
Prof. Bernard A. Galler, of the
mathematics department, has
charge of the program, which is
being financed by a National Sci-
ence Foundation grant of $36,-

IN PUBLIC HEALTH SCHOOL:

PAG$ MI? -
High School Math Teachers
To Meet in Summer Institute

700. Each of the 35 participants
from throughout the U n i t e d
States will receive a $450 stipend,
plus allowances for travel and de-
pendents and funds to cover Uni-
versity fees.
Three courses, each carrying
two credit hours toward a gradi-
ate degree, will be offered.

Get that

WILLIAM E. STIRTON
... Dearborn director

term. credit hours will be needed.
R e q u i r e d courses will include
mathematics, English, humanities
electives and several technical
electives along with courses in en-
gineering mechanics and in me-
chanical, chemical and metallur-
gical and electrical engineering.
The general regulations also
specify that "the work assign-
ments in business or industry
must be acceptable to the Uni-
versity. -
"Although no academic credit
is granted to students for the
work experience, the University
will not approve any work assign-
ments which do not offer oppor-
tunities or experience which con-
tribute to the total educational
program."
In meritorious cases, the direc-
tor of the Dearborn 'Center with
the approval of the Executive
Committee is empowered to speci-
fy course or work assignment sub-
stitutions.

Vaughan, a native of Ann Ar-
bor, is the son of the late Dr.
Victor G. Vaughan, a former
dean of the medical school.
Health commissioner of Detroit
from 1914-1941, he led the city's
fight against tuberculosis and de-
veloped its first housing code to
combat unsanitary conditions.
Taking time out from his posi-
tion in Detroit to serve as a cap-
tain of the Army Sanitary Corps
in World War I, Vaughan worked
with Gen. William C. Gorgas in
controlling the spread of pneu-
monit in military camps.
Served in Detroit
While a member of Detroit's
health department, he also estab-
lished the William H. Maybury
Sanatorium at Northville and con-
ducted a highly successful bond
drive for the construction of the
Herman Kiefer Hospital there.
Vaughan has served as presi-
dent of the Michigan Advisory
Council to the State Board of
Health for the last 25 years. His
father held the same position
from 1883-1921, making it vir-
tually a Vaughan family monopo-
ly for three-quarters of a cen-
tury.
He joined the University facul-
ty in 1921 as a visiting lecturer
and was appointed dean of the
public health school when it was
established in 1941.
Got Foundation Aid
The school was constructed
with the aid of contributions from
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation,
the Rockefeller Foundation and
the United States Public Health
-~

To Remain Active
After his retirement, Vaughan.
plans to remain active in public
health work, devoting most of his
time to his duties as president of
the National Sanitation Founda-
tion of Ann Arbor and to work as
a trustee of the W. K. Kellogg
Foundation of Battle Creek.
Miss Kendrick, a graduate of
Syracuse University and Johns
Hopkins University, has been a
resident lecturer with the public
health school since 1951. The epi-
demiology specialist was affiliated
with the Michigan Department of
Health Laboratories at Grand
Rapids from 1920-1951.
While in this position, she com-
pleted extensive studies on the
diagnosis and prevention of
trials in 1934 to test the value of
the pertussis vaccine for the dis-
Ludlow Takes
Job at Indiana
li Research
Prof. H. Glenn Ludlow of the
education school, director of the
University's Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Infor-
mation, has accepted an appoint-
ment at Indiana University, effec-
tive Sept. 1.
At Indiana, he will be director
of the Bureau of Research and
Measurement and assistant direc-
tor of the Division of Research
and Field Services in the edu-
cation school. As at the Univer-
sity, he also will have the title of
professor of education and ex-
pects to teach at least one course.
He will be responsible for cam-
pus-wide testing of students for
admission, aptitudes and related
areas, direct research in connec-
tion with state-wide school prob-
lems, and give assistance to grad-
uate students and faculty mem-
bers undertaking and completing
research projects in the field of
education.
Prof. Ludlow holds three de-
grees from IU-a Bachelor of
Arts in 1936, a Master of Arts in
1941 and a Doctor of Philosophy
in educational psychology in 1950.
He joined the University fac-
ulty and staff in Sept., 1950, with
a joint appointment in the School
of Education and the Extension
Service. Prof. Ludlow became di-
rector of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Infor-
mation in 1956'and was promoted
to professor of education in 1958.

ease in Grand Rapids and Kent
County.
The effectiveness of the vac-
cine was proved through her work
which also aided in establishing
the field trial as an important
method for measuring the degree
of immunization of vaccines.
After joining the University
staff, Miss Kendrick continued
her work on the pertussis vaccine
and is still contributing to scien-
tific knowledge of multi-purpose
vaccines.
This work will be continued aft-
er her official retirement from
the University.
Tiedeman has acted as resident
lecturer in milk and food sanita-
tion at the public health school
for the past nine years.
Studied Diseases
Before coming to the Universi-
ty, he spent 25 years with the
New York State Department of
Health where he helped establish
sontrol of oyster-borne typhoid
fever and of milk-borne diseases.
Tiedeman conducted a three-
year study of malaria in the Phil-
ippine Islands and worked on ma-
laria control in Georgia for the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice during and following World
War I.
Among his other positions, he
also has served as chairman of a
;ommittee on environmental san-
tation for the World Health Or-
manization and has been a fre-

fessors of German from Harvard,
Yale, California, Indiana and
Ohio State universities, Prof.
Reichart will be the guest of the
federal government of West Ger-
many during the trip.
The group will visit a number
of German universities and meet
with leaders in political, academic
and literary circles in order to
observe the changes and progress
made by the nation since World
War II.
Ketcham Wins
Teacher Grant

Saffel

Inl
& '

Cool, Calm
comfortable
appearance

Prof. Warren
(Ph.D.), of the
has received a
from the United

Bush

A. Ketchaml
education school
Fulbright grant
States State De-

WASH 'N WEAR
FABRIC SUITS
(Dacron and Cotton)

partment.
He will lecture on child devel-
opment at the University of
Leeds, England. The grant is one
of more than 400 for lecturing
and research abroad included in
the program for the academic
year 1959-60.

1$39°0

£

SAFFIEJUL

&

BUSH

Air-Conditioned comfort is yours
while having your hair cut
in the latest styles
i Jul. &ta6ep4
715 North University

STATE STREET -ANN ARBOR

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HAVE YOU VISITED OUR
SNAI BAR

ENTERTAINING PROBLEMS ?

THE QUARRY INC. welcomes you
Summer School Students to Ann Arbor.

SEE US FOR

andc

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PRIVATE GARDEN

QUIET MUSIC

NAPKINS
MATCH ES
INVITATIONS

PLAYING CARDS.
COASTERS
ANNOUNCEMENTS

A secluded garden on State Street is a surprise
indeed. Romantic and discriminating people
are invited to enjoy it and our modest menu.

RInaR /2ErinGeri finc
PRINTERS " ENGRAVERS * STATIONERS

LA TOURAINE COFFEE

FROSTED DELIGHTS

OPEN from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

119 EAST LIBERTY

NO 8-7900

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(NEXT TO STATE THEATRE)

For Bargains in
NEW and USED

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Summer School
Special
POPULAR
Royce-Union
LIGHTWEIGHT MODEL
DOUBLE GUARANTEE

'95

We cordially invite you to visit our departments
which are designed to serve you better.

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For all Summer School courses

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ALSO

Our COSMETIC DEPARTMENT
features many treatment lines, ex-
clusive French perfumes, and gift
items. We have two experienced,
cosmeticians to serve you. Gift wrap-
ping is available at no extra charge.

* We also take pride in our PHO-
TOGRAPHIC STORE which we con-
sider is second to none. Here you
receive fast, expert finishing of all
kinds, We have many lines of cam-
era equipment (exclusive with us):
and three photographic experts who
can help you with any problem in
photography.

RALEIGH

0 SCHWINN S

EVANS @ SAVOY

BUY and SAVE

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BIKE
RENTALS

USED
BIKES

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R We believe we are offering you the most complete prescription service in
Washtenaw county. This includes eight registered pharmacists to care for
tll your drug needs.

SPORTING

TOYS

GOODS

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