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September 15, 1959 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

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4.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1959

ONE MILLION DOLLARS:
Students Receive Scholarship H elp

By PHILIP SHERMAN
About one million dollars in
scholarship aid was given to Uni-
versity students last year, Ivan
Parker, Assistant Dean of Men
announced recently.
In addition to this, he said, an-
other million was loaned to Uni-
versity students.
Parker divided scholarship op-
portunities into three categories.
The first, he noted, are those
given to entering students, award-
Faculty Group
Gives Concerts,
Part of the University's musical
scene is the Woodwind Quintet
which performs works of the clas-
sical composers and also contem-
porary writers such as Ibert, Mil-
haud and Carter.
The group of five faculty mem-
hers gives at least one concert in
Ann Arbor during the semester
and also plays in various cities
throughout the state.
Last March they toured the Up-
per Peninsula.
Radio and television appear-
ances are also made by the quii-
tet. The group was organized at
the University in 1949.

ed by May 1 of the semester pre-
ceding entrance.
For Undergraduates
The other two, Parker said,
those given by various schools and
colleges and the general under-
graduate scholarships, are award-
ed to students already attending
the University.
Application for these must be
made around the end of first se-
mester in residence. A "B" aver-
age, Parker commented, is the
practical cutoff point for consid-
eration because of the great com-
petition.
Need, Parker said, is a prime
consideration. About one in four
applicants receive grants, he ex-
plained.
The scholarship awards, which
are announced in May, June and
July are outlined in the booklet,
"University Scholarships, Fellow-
ships and Prizes," available from
the Office of Student Affairs.
Loans Available
In addition to scholarships, stu-
dents may receive University aid
in the form of loans, Parker
added.
University loans, at three per
cent interest, usually totaling un-
der six hundred dollars payable at
the end of the semester, are ap-
plied for at the offices of the
deans of men and women.
In addition to this source,

Parker said, the National Defense
Education Act loans will be
handled by the University.
All may apply for them, but
education students receive first
priority, with scientists, mathe-
maticians and modern foreign
language students second, and
general students third.

USED
TEXTBOC..OKS'.
ULRICH'S has The Largest Stock In Michigan

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ALL-CAMPUS BODY:
joint Judiciary Council
Student Supreme Court

SPECIAL CHECKING' ACCOUNTS
No service fees ... no minimum balance. Simply'
buy 20 checks for $2.00. It's the easy, the econom-
ical, the convenient way to pay bills if you write
only a few checks. And it's ideal for students.
Available at all bank offices.

Joint Judiciary Council is the
students' supreme court on cam-
pus.
Guided by the principle of
counseling a violator rather than
mechanically handing him a pun-
ishment, the council of ten stu-
dents hears those cases within its
jurisdiction of, supervising all-'
campus rules, as well as thosea
cases referred to it by the DeanJ
of Men's office and those appealed
by students.;
All-campus rules include such'
regulations as driving rules, rules
regarding drinking and those list-
ed in the University booklet of
regulations for students. Joint Ju-
dic also supervises all campus
elections and regulates tapping
procedures for the honoraries.
Peer Judgment
When a student or a group of
students is brought before the
council, he is informed that the
members are sitting as a "peer
group" of his fellow students and
that their intention is to reach a
fair decision.
In an informal atmosphere the
council members go over a sum-
mary of the case, written before
the student appears, and question
the student to determine the rele-
vant material. They attempt dur-
ing the interview to make certain
that the student understands his
violation.
After the interview the council
reaches a decision and informs
the student of it. The Faculty
Subcommittee on Discipline re-
views all cases and in the case of
second violation, determines the
punishment.
Can Initiate Change
"The judiciary system can also
be a force to innovate needed
changes in the regulations," Prof.
John W. Reed of the law school
said. An example of this function
is seen in the council's action this
year concerning the definition of
student residences as concerned
with the drinking regulations.
Baroque Trio
Unique Type
Of 'U' Group
"The University is the only such
institution I know of that has a
regularly sponsored organization
to present music of this type,"
commented Prof. Florian Mueller
of the music school.
The Baroque trio, a University
organization since 1955, is com-
posed of Prof. Mueller who plays
the oboe, Prof. Nelson Hauenstein,
flute, and Prof. Marilyn Mason
Brown, harpsichord. All are in the
music school.
Specializing in music from 1600
to 1750, the group plays composi-
tions of the Baroque period of
music which ends with the death
of Bach.
The playing of much of this
music has been neglected and
many pieces only now are being
made available," Prof. Mueller
said. "For example, one composi-
tion which we have played was
printed in 1740. We had to have a
photostatic copy made of the re-
cently found music."
The trio presents a concert in
Ann Arbor each semester and
plays engagements throughout

The council reinterpreted the
ruling so that residences where
all occupants were over 21 would
not be included within it.
The members of Joint Judic are
chosen after petitioning by inter-
views with the council. "The
council certainly isn't looking for
a completely righteous and pious
person in all his thoughts and ac-
tions, but one who has an under-
standing of what's happening on
campus and in the students'
minds," Steven Simich, '59E, past
chairman of Joint Judic, said.

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ANN ARBOR BANK

101-107 South Main "
Packard at Brockman

303 S. State

1108 S. University

9571 Main St., Whitmore Lake

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1:

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
9:00 and 1 1:00 A.M. Worship Service.
6:00 P.M. Student Supper.
7:00 P.M. Lutheran Student Association Pro-
gram.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Sunday Services at 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
Worship and Program at 7:00 P.M. Sunday.
WESLEY FOUNDATION, METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER, open daily from 8:00 A.M. to 10:00
P.M. STUDENTS WELCOME.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL'
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and 12:00
noon.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes in Catholic Doctrine taught at the Center
on weekday evenings.

SUNDAY-
9:30 and I11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Program and Worship Service.
MONDAY-
8:00 P.M. Graduate Group.
TUESDAY-
4:30-6:00 P.M. Coffee Break.
WEDNESDAY-
Noon-Social Action Committee.
FRIDAY-
Noon-Lecture Discussion.
8:00 P.M. Fireside.
SATURDAY-
After Football Games-Cider and Doughnuts.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
SUNDAY-
9:30 A.M. Study Seminar.
7:00 P.M. Program and Worship Service.
MONDAY-
8:00 P.M. Graduate Group.
TUESDAY-
4:30-6:00 P.M. Coffee Break.
WEDNESDAY-
12:00 Noon-Social Action Committee.
FRIDAY-
12:00 Noon-Lecture Discussion.
8:00 P.M. Fireside.
SATURDAY-
After football games-Cider and Doughnuts.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service.

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ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 8-8802
SUNDAY--

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