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September 15, 1959 - Image 24

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

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EIGRT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1959

EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1959

4

)ean Bacon Discusses European Touri

__

By KATHLEEN MOORE
Back from a vacation in Europe,
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
has decided "seven languages,
seven capitals, seven currencies in
a month's time are too much-
at least for me."
Miss Bacon and Assistant Dean
of Women Elsie R. Fuller were
the only participants in a music
tour planned by Gail W. Rector,
executive director of the Univer-
sity Musical Society.
Although "very glad to get
back," she did enjoy flying to Am-
sterdam, Vienna, Florence, Rome,
the Riviera, Paris, London and
Brussels.
Began in June
The trip began the day after
Commencement, she said, in order
to see Europe, "before they smash
it down again.",
Two places she had never visit-
ted 'before, Vienna and Brussels,
topped Miss Bacon's list of favor-
ite foreign cities.
"To me the most beautiful, per-
fect, exquisite taste in artifacts--
anything that is made-is in Vi-
enna now, not Paris," she said in
recalling highlights of her tour.
Another of the delights of Vi-
enna for the dean was the per-
formance of one of Hindemith's
choral concerts with the composer
directing the a capella choir. The
beauty of the music and singing
she described as "unbelievable,"
and the atmosphere of friendli-
ness among director, singers and
audience as "like a jam session."
Brussels Historic
As for Brussels, Miss Bacon
commented that it is the historic
city of Europe.
Rome, she noted, is "just too
much past."
She found the Italian city "very
depressing," mainly because she
doesn't like to be "so conspicuous-
ly reminded that I'm only one
unit in a coral atoll." The weight

'

phasis on the past, she explained,
it "bouncess you into the future
with a very acid wit" and the at-
titude of "eh, bien, why not?"
Roman Culture
As for the culture of ancient
Rome, Miss Bacon expressed the
opinion that there is only one
modern society, the United States'
Western technology, which can
and does compare with it.
Defining culture as "the use of
typical artifacts," Miss Bacon said
in ancient times one could see the
stamp of Greek or Roman culture
in parts of nearly every outpost
of civilization from southern
France to northern Africa, just as
one finds indications of American-
ization and western Technology
throughout the modern world.
Their culture "was transport-
able and we are doing the same!
thing whether we like it or not."
American Culture
American culture is transport-
able to the extent that "we can
box it up into a little exhibit and
fair and ship it to Moscow, send-
ing Vice-President Nixon along,"
she emphasized."
Pericles, leader of Athens dur-
ing its golden age, did the same
thing, she insisted, when he
shipped thousands of pottery jars
to all parts of the world as Amer-
ica does when it sends millions of
"shiny new Frigidaires" overseas.
Final Reflection
Reflecting on her tour as a
whole, Miss Bacon had but three
items she would have liked to
bring home with her: "two crip-
pled women from the Louvre -
one poor lady has no head and
the other has no arms" - and
the Christ Church College Chapel1
from the University of Cambridge
-"for my money, the most beau-
tiful building in Europe."

I

ColegE e ashions
for Fall -
MADEMOISELLE MAGAZINE

( /

PICKS THEM . .

.

Marti Walker has them!

1~.

RETURNS FROM TOUR -- D
visited seven European capitals t
before "they smash it down agai
of history found in Rome makes
one "lose all confidence in the ini-
tiative and power of the individ-
ual," she continued.
For illustration, Miss Bacon
used the city's buildings in which
historical reminders frequently
resembled a "rabbit warren" in
abundance.
Describes Floors
The floors often represent

Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
his summer, seeing the Continent
in."
periods in history, she pointed
out, with the basement made of
red Etruscan bricks and the first
floor indicating classic Rome, the
.second the Renaissance and the
18th century and the top floor
built in the modern style.
By contrast, she said of Paris-
"the history is all there but the
attitude is so different."
By-passing such complete em-

COATS

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,,.

Cooperatives Offer Democratic Group Living
WCU.

SU ITS
DRESSES
FORMALS
RAINWEAR
SPORTSWEAR
LINGERIE
HOSE
ACCESSORI ES

Those yummy campus fashions for fall . . . you saw them in
Mademoiselle Magazine-you'll find them exclusively at MARTI
WALKER, the campus fashion shop at U. of M.
This is one fact every queen learns quickly and well here.
Not only is MARTI WALKER the shop chosen by MLLE to
feature MLLE fashions in Ann Arbor, it's the place you come
whenever you're looking for something new.. .
Things eye-catching and beau-catching. Things daring and
dashing. Things cozy and cuddly. Things for class and things
for classes. The unusual, the clever, the dreamy idea - when
that' what you want, MARTI WALKER'S for you.
Soon as you're settled, come in and get acquainted. Browse
to your heart's delight. Marti and her staff are here to help you,
not to nester. Tust get oriented to MARTI WALKER - and

,,

By MICHAEL BURNS
Democracy and economy are
the goals of cooperative housing
on the University campus.
First organized in 1934 for the
purpose of economy, the co-ops
have grown to include 133 student
residents and 74 students who
take only their meals at the
houses.
There are eight units on the
campus: four for women, three
for men and one apartment build-
ing for married students. Each of
them operates under the Roch-
dale principles which call for
open membership, one vote for
each member and the equal shar-
ing of the duties and responsibili-
ties as well as of the benefits.
Many Foreign
About 30 per cent of the mem-
bers are foreign students who
particularly enjoy the cosmopoli-
tan atmosphere of the co-ops. In-
dividuality as well as the spirit of
group cooperation is stressed and
no attempt is made to standard-
ize the group.
The affairs of the houses are
run on a democratic basis. The
members decide on the work
schedule, the type of food they
want and the house policy and
rates. Officers are elected to lead
the group and a house manager

is chosen to run the affairs of
the house. Theumanager's job is
to assign the work tasks and to
purchase the food.
Food is purchased in large
wholesale quantities and the ad-
ministrative and maintenance
work is done by the members.
There is no hired staff or faculty
supervision.
ICC Important
Inter-Cooperative Council plays
an important role in purchasing
quantities of food for all the co-
ops. The Council also buys houses
to establish new cooperatives.
This organization strives to im-
prove living conditions for stu-
dents with as little expense as
possible.
It is affiliated with the North
American Student Cooperative
League, which links together over
500 co-ops of various types in the
United States and Canada through
the mutual exchange of informa-
tion.
The cost of cooperative living is
approximately $240 a semester for
room and board, plus about five
hours work a week. Students who
desire only board pay about $150
a semester and work a fewer
number of hours.
Room arrangements are up to
the individual and he may choose
his own roommate. Any student

V"

you'll be known as a smart belle on

campus.

See page 344 August Mademoiselle for listings of all the college shops.
If it's new--look for it at

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ti

F r

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GROUP LIVING -- An opportunity to live and associate with
students of all nationalities and backgrounds is provided by the
cooperative housing system. Here two students chat at Nakamura
house.
may apply for admission at. the I and when a vacancy occurs in
ICC office on the second floor of Ithat house he signs a contract,
the Student Activities Building.chooses his room and arranges his
Vacancies are filled on a first- work schedule. He is then a part-
come, first-served basis. The ap- ner in and a member of the co-
plicant has his choice of houses operative.

214-218 SOUTH STATE

"ON THE CAMPUS"

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UF %"4
EVERYONE

IN ANN ARBOR

SHOPS AT

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/r
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J r

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