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September 15, 1959 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

15, 1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILI

Stirton Displays
arborn Center Campus

FROM SPEECH DEPARTMENT:
Playbill Features Five Productions

-c-

(Continued from Page 6)

Prof. Josef Blatt of the music
school shared directing chores
with Prof. Bender and took time
out to explain the intricacies of
opera production. Words and
music are learned separately at
first, he said, then integrated to
produce a harmonious effect.
On stage, he continued, "the
players cannot pause even a min-
ute to compose themselves or to
take a deep breath because at all
times they must keep up with the
music."
Second Opera
Next on the speech department's
calendar was another opera, this
time an English translation of
Rossini's "The Barber of Seville,"
again directed by the team of
professors, Blatt and Bender.
The plot begins with competi-
tion between two suitors, one a
handsome young nobleman and
the other a dour old man, who
loves a beautiful young maiden.
The maiden, incidentally, is the
old man's ward.
The competition soon shifts to
the two suitors' hirelings, one the
barber Figaro and the other a,
musician and the plot thickens as
tricksters battle tricksters, but
young love and Figaro vin out
in the end.
'Volpone' Next
"Volpone" appeared next on the
playbill, illustrating what happens
when highly rational men are not
influenced by moral and social
obligations.
Under the direction of Prof.
Norton, Jonson's production clear-
ly revealed and castigated the
universal knavery of mankind.
Wealthy Volpone, seeking greater
wealth, feigns illness in order to

entice would-be heirs to shower
him with gifts.
His deception is aided by his
hired knave, Mosca, who is even
more unscrupulous than his em-
ployer and brings to mind the
essence of a master politican.
With Mosca's persuasion, each, of
the hopeful heirs displays his utter
depravity and no one manages to
come out on top in anything.
Closed with 'Electra'
A marked contrast to the other
productions was the final presen-
tation of the regular playbill,
"Electra." Directed by Prof. Hal-
stead, the play deals with Electra's
insistence on avenging her father,
Agamemnon's death.
Agamemnon had been murder'ed
by his wife and her paranour
after the Trojan War and Elec-
tra's defiance toward the pair re-
sults in virtual slavery for her.
She uses the traditionally-pres-
ent Greek chorus as confidant and
advisor until her brother, Orestes,
arrives and carries out the retri-
bution by killing the guilty pair.
More Like Puppets
The persons in the drama,
critics generally agree, are less
individuals than puppets symbolic
of people entrapped in the predic-
aments which condemn humanity.
Sophocles refrains from passing
any judgements on their actions.
The year's final presentation
was "Man on a Tiger," written by
a University graduate student and
performed as one of the bonuses'
to season ticket holders."
A modern play in the realistic
vein, directed by Prof. Norton, it
deals with the Americanization of
second-generaton immigrants, fo-
cussing on the problems of a boy
crippled at.birth who has his leg

amputated and replaced by a
wooden one.
His actions symbolize not only
adoption of American ways, but
rejection of his family, for the leg
was part of the heritage he re-
ceived at birth.
SGC To Sell
Students will have the chance to
purchase used bikes in a Student
Government Council-run auction
the first ;Satirday after classes
begin.
The bikes will, be auctioned off
starting at 9:30 a.m. on Sept. 26
at the Stident Activities Building
workshop ° entrance. The auction
will continue until the bikes are
all sold or until- 12:30'p.m. so that
people who wish can attend the'
Michigan-Missouri football game.
However, Nancy Adams,'60, chair-
man of SGC's Student. Activities
Committee, predicts that the bikes
will all be sold by then.
The bikes will be on display for
those who wish to inspect them
starting at 8:30 a.m.
A total of 74 bikes were col-
lected during the spring exam
period. At that time the students

City Drama
Given Lift
By 'S'eason'
The culmination of the year's
theatrical productions in. Ann Ar-
bor is the annual University Drama
Season, which-domes to town each
year in late spring. r
During its 24th season last May
and June, the Drama Season
brought five plays to Ann Arbor,
from 'Macbeth" to "The Happiest
Millionaire."
Shakespeare received special
treatment in the first production
of the last Drama Season, which
starred Charlton Heston in "Mac-
beth." Supporting Heston in the
tragedy were Jacqueline Brookes
and Ernest Graves, with Francis
Compton.
Switching from heavy tragedy
to light comedy, Drama Season
next presented Leon Ames and
Charles Hohman in "'Howie," a
comedy take-off - on the slowly-
dying television craze. of multi-
thousand dollar quiz shows, com-
plete with isolation booths.
Nancy Sheridan and Gaye Jor-
dan supported Ames and Hohman
in' the play, in which Ames re-
peated his original New York tole.
Samuel Beckett's obscure mod-
ern-day morality play, "Waiting
for Godot," was the third offering
of the Drama Season. Starring
Paul \Hartman and Earle Hyman,
the play told the story of two
tramps, a la Charlie Chaplin, on
the road to "Heaven knows where."
After "Godot" came a comedy-
drama, "Summer of the 17th Doll."
Again starring Charles Hohman,
"Summer" was the first Australian
play to win an international repu-
tation.
It tells the story of two itiner-
ant cane-cutters who spend their
summer-lay-offs eachyear with
two barmaids in the city.
The last production of the Dra-
ma Season was "The Happiest Mil-
lionaire," which starred Conrad
Nagel in the story of a wealthy
Philadelphia Main Line family.

APARTMENTS
TO RENT
ANN ARBOR'S MOST MODERN BUILDINGS,
FURNISHED AND UNFURNISHED

IPUS TOUR-University Vice-President and Director of the
rborn Center William E., Stirton took prospective students on
ur of the 'Center campus last spring. The Center will open
monith on a "minimal" basis with programs in engineering
business administration.

were given half of the
value of the bike. The
will receive any amountt
that the bike will bring.
part of the sale pricei
student selling his bike

assessed
students
over this
The only
that the
does not

" TWO BEDROOMS
* NEW FURNITURE
" GARBAGE DISPOSAL
" BIRCH KITCHEN CABINETS
" CERAMIC TILE BATH WITH SHOWER
" ABUNDANT CLOSET
ACCOMMODATIONS
" LAUNDRY FACILITIES
4 TV MASTER OUTLET
* AUTOMOBILE ,PARKING

WESTINGHOUSE
hwh 4 "em at

II.,

receive is 10 per cent which will
be used to defray any expenses
incurred.
Any profits that are made by
SGC will go into its Student Ac-
tivities Scholarship Fund.
Ann Arbor police will be on hand'
at the auction so that buyers can
buy their bicycle licenses without
having to go downtown to the
City Hall.

Instruments
Adjustments

Accessories
Repairs

20c WASH

MASTER BOW REHAIRING

10c DRY

HAS KAYLO'S TRING SHOP

Fine Workmanship Has Its Voice

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Across from Women's League #4

WARD

Management

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308 SO. STATE STREET
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

327 E. Huron St.-Ann Arbor, Mich.
After 6 P.M. NO 5-6714 or NO 5-5515

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