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September 15, 1959 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

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CAMPUS P1

(Continued from Preceding Page)
the intellectual life must be legis-
lated:
"The University through its
rules and regulations, must estab-
lish a community which will en-
hance rather than hinder scholar-
ship, abhorrent as such rules may
be to the student, and incidentally,
to a freedom-loving faculty...:." ,
In his final essay, titled "The
New Dictator," Perkins labels
1957-58 as the year of the Great
Educational Awakening, and re-;
iterates some of his appeals.
He emphasizes that citizens
must be given a more adequate
vision of the responsibility of high-
er education, and come to realize
that "the greatest advantage ac-
cruing from higher education is
to society, the nation, not the
individual"

be questioned. Particular among
these is the implicit notion that
17 education must be an instrument
for producing public leaders in our
L democracy. This contradicts his
explicit statement that govern-
ment in a democracy must let
HE STRESSES that "we in high- learning flourish' freely,
er education have to be so An education scheme which
positive in our intellectual goals would train and produce young
and so steadfast in adherence to democrats is curiously close to
them that we will influence the the Russian system which sternly
general citizenry rather than be develops young men for service to
influenced by their frequent mis- the state.
conceptions of what constitutes To shift our educational system
excellence in education." so dramatically would rupture to
Finally, he reminds the student a great degree the tradition of
of the tremendous responsibility free inquiry and thought to which
he bears. Perkins calls on the we so often pay lip service.
modern student to study con- Otherwise, Perkins' "crash pro-
tinually, between classes, and at gram" is a sound one; the prob-
any other free moment. lems he points out are the critical
Studying diligently and cease- ones; and his toughness is refresh-
lessly; each student must become ing.
what Perkins calls a "new dic- Certainly, most of his appeals
tator" with the vital power of self- are far from new; but then again,
discipline, the American public has not yet
responded with adequate support,
FOR ALL THE worth of his ar- And until they do, it is crucially
guments, some of Perkins' as- necessary for dedicated men like
sumptions can and probably will Perkins to reaffirm "the obvious."

'The Years with Ross
(Continued from Page 10) ture of Ross, the man andthe
THE BOOK which takes Thurber editor
and his readers through theIT IS A tribute to Thurber that
Syears with Ross is beautiful in the man who devoted his life to
parts, hilarious in many parts, the fortunes of the magazine which
perceptive at other places, but well- he founded .and loved comes
written all the way through. An through so well in the pages of the
added bonus, perhaps because book. He was a man of many con-
Thurber is the author of this tome, tradictions and peculiarities, but
is the Thurber cartoons and draw- his story is told, not objectively,
but with something more than ob-
ings scattered throughout the book. jectivity-with love. The eccentric-
However, all but three or four are (ties in his character come through
captionless, so one has to exer- just as they were, but they in no
cise his memory to - remember way dull the finished portrait, nor
which caption went with which do they make him seem any less
cartoon. the truly unique man that he .as.
Another added bonus in this Thurber's book was not done
book are the glimpses of other peo- solely by the humorist himself; he
ple, which often become half-size was aided by many of Ross' friends
character sketches or life por- and New Yorker contributors; who
traits. These are all people who helped out with letters, anecdotes
are associated with Ross or the and other remembrances of Ross.
New Yorker in some way or an- But this book itself Is the greatest
other, and add to the total pic- remembrance of the New Yorker

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Poge Twelve

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