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July 25, 1959 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATIJXIDAY,

INSYLANIA TOURNAMENT
)lmedo, MacKay Move Into Semifinals

WVERFORD, Pa. OP) - Alex
do, Wimbledon champion
Los Angeles and the top
hope for retaining the Davis
advanced to the senifinal'
d of the Pennsylvania Lawn
Lis Championship yesterday,
ating Mike Green of UCLA,
5-7, 6-4.
e tightly-contested match
interrupted twice by rain, and
battled right down to the
h.
'een, of Miami, Fla., took the
id set by breaking service in
L2th game. He lost his service
ie fifth game of the third set,
battled back before Olmedo
able to finish him off in the
i game. Green lost when he
handed a return of service
of court.
day, Olmedo will face Ian,
naak of South Africa,. seeded
2 on the foreign list, who sur-
d bydefeating fourth-seeded
Buchholz Jr.. of St. Louis
8-6.
chholz lost the first set after
e times being within one point
inning at 6-5, 40-love. He was
ed into five straight errors in
ig that game, and then Ver-'
k broke through in the 17th

game with a cross-court passing
shot to lead 9-8 and followed up
by taking his service . game for
10-8.
Buchholz, a Davis Cup possi-
bility and winner of the U. S. and
English junior championships last
year, also failed to hold leads of
4-1 and 5-2 in the second set. Ver-
maak rallied beautifully to win,
breaking through service in the
13th game and winning in the
14th with a backhand volley.

For Direct Classified Ad Service,
Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday thru Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'till 11:30 AM

Ramanathan Krishnan, a Davis
Cup player from India, and Barry
MacKay. U. S. Cup competitor,
also reached the semifinals in the
60th renewal of the event at the
Merion Cricket Club. They will
meet today.
Krishnan, 22, won his quarter-
final match 10-8, 6-4, over Vic
Seixas, former U. S. Davis Cup
star and seven times the winner
of this state title. MacKay de-
fending champion from Dayton,

Ohio, eliminated left-handed Abe
Segal, South Africa, 8-6, 6-3.
Krishnan won the opening set
by scoring the only breakthrough
of service in the 18th game. Seix-
as, a Philadelphian, warded off
one set point with a high volley
which caught the Indian running
the wrong 'way. But he lost the
second set point with a back hand
volley that just missed the line by
inches.

li

MOUNT PROSPECT OPEN:
Suggs Leads in Women's Tourney

MOUNT PROSPECT, Ill. WP) -
Louise Suggs, still burning. up
after her disqualification last
week in the Alliance (Ohio) Open,
yesterday bore down with a sub-
par 73 to take a 2-stroke lead in
the first round of the $20,000
Mount Prospect Women's Open.
The wiry little veteran pro from
Sea Island, Ga., said in an inter-
view that she still was seeing red
"after being kicked out at Alli-

hInson' Decisions Pastrano
10 Rounds at Louisville

ance for not attending a spon-
sors' cocktail party.
"You can bet your eyetooth
that I want to win this one, and
not just for the $6,500 first prize,"
she said. "It will help me cool off
if I do."
Miss Suggs, third leading
money winner of the ladies PGA
with $11,674, toured the snug
6,421-yard, par 37-37-74 Mount
Prospect course in 37-36-73. She
dropped a 12-foot birdie putt on
the 10th and finished out in
straight pars.
Only two strokes behind in the
chase for the largest winning
prize ever offeredthedistaff side
were Ptaty Berg with a 35-40-75
and Mickey Wright, second top
money w nner' with $12,482 after
taking the Alliance $2,200 first
award,. with 38-37-45.
Grouped at 76 were Mary Lena
Falk, 39-37; Norma; Shook, Mount
Prospect pro, with 36-40; Beverly
Hanson 40-36, and Peggy Kirk
Bell, 36-40.
Seven pros were bracketed at
77, including Betsy Rawls, No. 1
on the LPGA list with $13,154.
Others were Glora Fecht, Betty

Hicks, Murle MacKenzie, Bar-
bara Romack, Marlene Hagge and
Barbara Rotvig.
Topping the nine amateurs in
the field of 44 was Mrs. Frank
Stranahan, with 81.
The best start of the day was
made by Miss Berg. She eagled
the 430-yard second hole with a
3, sticking a 3-iron shot 6 feet
from the cup. She was four under
par going to the 176-yard ninth.
Then she hit a creek on her tee

shot and took a double bogey
From then on she struggled
get a 40 on the back side.

5.
to

r

OUISVILLE, Ky.(P) - Alonzo
nison, the former barber from
ddock, Pa., scored a unani-
s decision over Willie Pas-
o in thqir 10-round televised
t last night at Freedom Hall.
'e heavy-fisted boxer had his
ller opponent from Miami in'
ble from the opening round
n he began working on Pas-
o's body.
.air of punishing rights and
s early in the seventh round
Ul Stars Set
or Baltimore
VANSTON, Ill. (T) -- Dr. Wil-
i Rothmann and trainer Tom
lion yesterday reported the
ege All-Star football squad is
excellent condition except for
Duple of linemen who might be;
ying too much weight.
he All-Stars, who meet the
fessional champion Baltimore
is Aug. 14 in Soldier Field, be-
workQuts yesterday at North-
tern University.

staggered Pastrano but he did not
go down.
Johnson, who has won 13
straight renewed the attack again
in the eighth and began concen-
trating on Pastrano's right eye.
Pastrano, who has a reputa-
tion for being extremely light on
his feet, was effective only in the
fifth and sixth rounds when he
managed to shake Johnson with
two sizzling rights to the head.
Johnson, ranked seventh by the
National Boxing Assn., also left
the sring with a bruise over his
right eye.
He scored most of his points by
carrying the fight to Pastrano
and' staying away from the little
heavyweight's flickering left.
Pastrano, who now has a rec-
ord of 48-8-5, appeared to tire in
the fifth round and was unable
to do much damage thereafter.
He weighed 187 pounds, against
183 V2 for Johnson who now has
an 18-i record.
Referee Paul Machney scored it
47-44 Johnson. Judge Sid Baer
had it 47-46. And Judge Walter
Beck scored it 48-45. The Asso-
ciated Press had it 48-42 in favor,
of Johnson.'

'd Sox Players Giving Up,
ayer Says in Newspaper

BOSTON ()- The Christian
Science Monitor yesterday quoted
a Boston Red Sox player as say-
ing the last place team has too
many athletes who are just go=s
ing through the motions.
In a front page, full-column
story by sports writer Ed Rumill
out of Kansas ,City, the paper
tackled the question of what the
Red Sox need to become a first
division outfit again.
The story did not identify the
player but added "since he was
an experienced, intelligent play-
er, it could be accepted as the
players' viewpoint."
In his analysis, the unnamed
athlete was quoted as saying:
"First of all, we have too many
players with the wrong attitude.
Too many men in key spots just
don't care whether school keeps
or not. They're simply going
through the motions, playing out
the season. Already, they're talk-
ing about what they're going to
do in the off season."
"I'd like to see a manager here
who is tough, real tough. The club

Aussies Wrin,
Cup Match'
MONTREAL (P) - With ailing
Neale Fraser on the sidelines,
Queenslanders Roy Emerson and
Rod Laver carried Australia to a
2-0 lead over Canada in the'
American Zone Davis Cup semi-1
finals yesterday with straight-
set singles victories.
Emerson turned back nervous3
Don Fontana, 28, of Toronto, 6-2,
6-2, 6-4. Laver smashed Jim Be-
dard, 27, of Sherbrogke, Que., 8-6,
6-3, 6-4.
The Australians now can clinch
a finalist berth against Cuba by!
winning today's doubles. Harry
Hoprman. the Australian captain,
may decide to do some doubles ex-
perimenting since he is off to such
an imposing: start.
It's expected Emerson will play
with Laver against Fontana and
Bedard. Another possible Aussie
combination, is Laver and Bob
Mark, who were runners-up to
Fraser and Emerson for the Wim-j
bledon championship.
It was learned thta Fraser, the
Australian's No. 1 ace and only
experienced Davis Cupper, may
be lost for the entire Davis Cup
campaign. He is suffering recurr-
ing appendicitis pains and an
operation may be necessary be-
fore the challenge round sched-
uled Aug. 28-30 at Forest Hills,
N. Y.
If Australia beats Canada, as
expected, Cuba will be played
here next weekend, with the win-
ner qualifying to meet the Euro-
pean zone champion at Philadel-
phia Aug. 7-9.
The European final at Milan,
Italy, was rained out yesterday
with Italy's giant Orlando Sirola
leading Juan Manuel Couder of
Spain 2-6, 8-6, 7-5, 2-6, 3-2. The
match will be played today along
with the other singles match in-
volving Italy's Nicola Pietrangeli
and Spain's Andres Gimeno.

Tennis Rules
May Change
SEATTLE (-P) - The rules and
regulations of the ancient game
of tennis may be in for a revamp-
ing, President Victor Denny of the
U. S. Lawn Tennis Assn. indicated
yesterday.
The International Lawn Tennis
Federation, at its recent meeting
in Dublin, formed a committee to
"study all phases of the amateur
rules" and report back at the
1960 meeting in Paris, Denny said.
James B. Dickey of Newark,
N. J., is the United States mem-
ber of the committee. Denny said
the group probably will hold its
first meeting in December or
January.
Several proposals prepared by
the United States for federation
discussion were dropped, Denny
said, with the expectation that
they will be considered by the
committee. They asked more lib-
eral expense accounts for touring
players.
Mlajor League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Chicago 54 39 .581 -
Cleveland 53 39 .576 14
Baltim ore 48 47' .505 7
New York f 47 48 .495 8
Detroit 47 50 .485 9
Kansas City 44 49 .473 10
Washintgon 43 51 .457 11%
Boston 40 53 .430 14
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 5, Washington 2
Kansas City 3 Boston 1
Chicago 2, Baltimore 1
Detroit 4, New York 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington atGCleveland
New York at Detroit
Boston at Kansas City (N)
Baltimore at Chicago
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
x-San Francisco 54 41 .568 -
Los Angeles 54 45 .546 liw
Milwaukee 48 43 .527 4
Pittsburgh 49 46 .516 5
x-Chicago 47 47 .500 61.
St. Louis 46 49 .484 8U,
Cincinnati 42 52 .447 11%
Philadelphia 38 55 *.409 15
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago at San Francisco, inc.,
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1
Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 0
Philadelphia 2,, Cincinnati 1
- TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee
St. Louis at Los Angeles (N)
Chicago at San Francisco

PERSONAL
PICK UP 90 CLAMS
Easy. No strings. Check your wire-
less, 1290 K.C., daily for clues.
WOIA Missing Man Contest, man!
F22
WANTED: One '59 Ensian, will pay
reasonable price. NO 5-7447 or NO
3-6916 P25'
FOR SALE
3 SIAMESE kittens, male and female,
about 4 months old. Also stud service.
Phone NO 2-9020. B12
FOR SALE: 34 ton quiet, automatic
room air conditioner. Used 3 months.
Call NO 3-0047 after 5. B8
FOR RENT
ONE ROOM studio for bachelor girl,
in lovely campus' area, furnished,
complete community kitchen. NO 2-
6987. C33
NEAR CAMPUS. Single rooms for male
students.: Call after 4:30 P.M. NO
2-4049, 606 S. Division. C32
CLOSE TO CAMPUS
Attractive, 3 rooms and private
bath. Clean and nicely furnished.
Phone NO 3-5372. C30
APARTMENT. Brand new furniture,
five blocks south of campus, Large'
living room, good sized bedroom,
separate kitchen, private bath. Avail-
able now. $110 per month for year
lease or reduced rent for summer.
Call Oscar Spaley days, NO 3-0501;
evenings, NO 2-5930. C28
DELUXE 3 room furnished apartment
includes heat and water. Semi-private
bath facilities. $90 a month. NO
2-9020. C27
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. % block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. C12
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 8-7089 or 3-3280.
C1
HELP WANTED
NEED MAN with first class engineering
license in radio. Also for on the air
part-time only, available at present.
NO 3-0569. H21
MATURE WOMEN: Do you need extra
money? Call NO 2-5274. H19
HOUSEWIVES: Would you like to add
to your family income? Call NO 2
5274. H2O
SECRETARY
Immediate opening for an admin-
istrative secretaryinterested in a
permanent position. Experienced
typist with dictation experience
and shorthand is preferred. Age
25-40 years. Liberal personnel bene-
fits. Apply Personnel Office, Univ.
Rosp., Mon.-Fri., 8-11 A.M., 1-3 P.M.
H16
ASSISTANT CASHIER
Vacancy in business office for male
between 25 and 45 years with some
college training. Desire a person
Iwith cashiering experience and able
to supervise other employees. Apply
Personnel Office, University Hos-
pital, Monday-Friday, 8-11 A.M..
1-3 P.M. H17
We are interested in you
IF
You want excellent sales training
and experience
IF
You need a good income
IF
You have ambitiQn for advancement.
We train you if you qualify. Ap-
plicant must have- automobile and
be available immediately. Call Mr.
Bryant at NO 5-6637. Leave name,
address and phone number if he is
ntavailable. H15

USED CARS
'56 Triumph, TR3 $1595
Michigan European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N28
'57 VOLVO $1,5$5
Mich. European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N26
KARMANN-GHIA, '58 VW sport coupe.
Beige, corduroy upholstery. 17,000
miles and in top condition. Call NO
3-0105. N27
TRIUMPH, 1954 TR-2..Radio and heat-
er. Excellent condition. Must sell. NO
3-7844. N28
1957 RENAULT DAUPHINE. $1,000 or
best offer. Call Milan, HE 9-2996.
N24

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
LINES ONE-DAY RATE
2 .80 .39
.96 .47
4 1.12 .54
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

322 S. Main

NO 2-5667
X3

BUSINESS SERVICES
FOR TODAY'S breakfast why not buy
some lox, cream cheese, bagels, onion
rolls, or assorted Danish pastry? Plan
ahead also later in the week
we'llhave smoked whitefish, gefitle
fish, kosher soups, pastrami, and
cornedbeef.Shop at Ralph's for these
delicious foods.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard N02-3175
J3
REWEAVING-Burns. tears, moth holes
rrewoven. Let us- save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J5
TYPING: Thesis. Term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
311

Complete line of Hill components
including kits; complete service on
radio, phonographs and HiFI equip-
mnents.

t

HI F1 STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
Phone NO 8-7942
X2
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: small, black clutch bag con-
taining very important papers and
keys. NO 8-6855. A4
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries-an4accessor-
ies. Varranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new a
used tires. Road service-mechanio
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
- 2E
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3150
Si

1

4

.J?..Jmtammis#ssssisa asn a ."msmna gm yteasa gtisgsss m

'I

q.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
8:00 A.M. Service in Douglas Chapel.
11 :00 A.M. Service in the sanctuary. Dr. Fr
E. Luchs preaching, "The Miracle of Chris
Church School, crib through Junior High, 11:
A.M.
Student Guild wilt meet at 524 Thompson for ri
to Island Park Summer Reunion Picnic. B
Marshbll, of Marshall's Book, Store, will spe
on "Why Don't We Read?" Time 4:00 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

needs shaking up. I thought per-
haps Billy Jurges could do it. But,
now I'm not so sure .. . a man-
ager mustrule with an iron fist ..-.
"Mechanically, the Red Sox
need a better defense in a couple
of spots. We need a better double
play combination at the middle of
the infield. We need a first base-
man who can hit the (left field)
wall at Fenway Park.
Score Fencers
With 'Device
CHICAGO (P) - The old cry of
"touche" won't be heard when
fencers from 14 nations compete
in the third Pan-Anerican Games.
An electronic system, with
flashing bulbs, has taken the
shouting out of fencing.
Each fencer's foil is wired so
contact with an opponent's body
registers on a score board, in red,
green and white lights.

National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY--
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Program: Rev.
Speaker.

-v

ed
00
des
ob
'
ak
ck u

William Bla

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Try Hammond's new play time plan.
Includes organ in your home for 30
days with 6 free lessons in our
studio for only $25.
Rent a Spinet piano of your owe
choice -$1 per month.
GRI NNELL'S

*

*

Read
Daily
Classifieds

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00 and 10:36ATM.
1 1:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Discussion.
FRIDAY-
6:30 P.M. Summer Fellowship Supper.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL' AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
David Schramm, Vicar
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.: Worship Service, with ser-
mon by pastor, "The Ages Belong to Him."
Sunday at 9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Fellowship Supper & Pro-
gram, with panel discussion on "The Christian
View of Man,"
Tuesday at 6:00 P.M.: Married Couples' Steak Fry
at'Center. Phone NO 3-5560 for reservations.
ANN ARBOR. REFORMED CHURCH
110 N. Fourth Ave.
Second floor, 'YM-'YWCA
Reverend Raymond Weiss
10:00 A.M. "higher Values"
7:30 P.M. "I Face the Low"
Nursery at 10:00 A.M.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday 'Masses 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.
and 12:00 noon.
Holiday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 AM
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS, MEETING
(Quakers)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Sunday: 10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "Forgive, andYou
Will Be Forgiven," the Rev. Eugene A. Ran-'
som, preaching.
2:00 P.M. Meet at Wesley Lounge, for outing at
nearby lake.

4'
4.
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-=

'IRUS DISEASE:
Tatum's Wife Moved to Hospital

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. WP)-Mrs.
Jim Tatum was moved from her
home to North Carolina Memorial
Hospital here yesterday suffering
from what appeared to be the
same mysterious contagious virus
that killed her 46-year-old hus-
band Thursday night.
Sunny Jim Tatum, his 240-
pound frame wracked by fever as-
sociated with a red rash that
Moore Flyingj
To Montreal
SAN DIEGO, Calif. - Light
heavyweight champion Archie
Moore said last night he would

poisoned his body, died in the
same hospital late Thursday night
on the eve of what he hoped
might be "my best season ever."
Tatum, facing his fourth year
as University of North Carolina
head football coach, had entered
the' hospital last Saturday. He
had been called home because of
the death of a sister. At the time
he and Mrs. Tatum were visiting
in Canada with Clemson College
coach Frank Howard at the home
of coach D. C. (Peahead) Walker
of the Montreal Allouettes of the
Canadian Football League.
His condition grew rapidly
worse. Physicians said the virus
overwhelmed him and affected
vital organs.
The funeral service will be held

the University of Maryland where'
he had produced winning teams
and been named 'the nation's
coach of the year in 1953. His
Maryland teams played in three
bowl games and the 1953 team
was voted national champion.
Tatum, a giant of a man and
a familiar figure to football fans
as he tramped the sidelines in a-
broad-brimmed, fawn-colored hat,
frequently was a controversial fig-
ure but never without words. His
overall coaching rceord was: 91.
victories, 34 defeats, seven ties.
"I talk too much," he was free
to admit as he went right on talk-
ing.
Dr. H. D. Byrd, president of the
University of Maryland and him-
selfr a former cach ofn the Terra-

9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Lesson Sermon.
Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty. 10:00 A.M. to
5:00 P.M. daily. Monday'7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMEDt
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
Mr. Jack LaMar, Student Pastor
10:45 A.M. Communion Service.
The Student Guild will meet at 524 Thompson for
Island Park Reunion Picnic; Bob Marshall,
"Why Don't We Read?" Time: 4:00 P.M.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1 131 ChurchSt.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
8:45 A.M. Lord's Supper.
10:30 A.M. Lord's Supper.
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hill and Tappan
Rev. Russell G. Fuller, Minister
9:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon Topic:
"Love's Good Manners," by Rev. Russell Fuller.
The Student Guild will meet at 524 Thompson for
Island Park Reunion Picnic; Bob Marshall,
"Why Don't We Read?" Time: 4:00 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

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t
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' {ti

MISSING!

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett; Pastor a

x
V

10:00 'A.M. Sunday School-University Class,
1 1-:00 A.M. "The Exclusive Gospel," Rev. San-
ford Morgan.
5:45 P.M. Jr. & Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. "When God Laughs," Rev. Sanford
Morgan.
Wednesday 7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Washington'& 5th Ave.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
1 1 "00 A.M. Church.
7.30 P.M. Sunday Evening Worship.
THURSDAY-
7:30 P M. Weekly Prayer Meeting.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
of Ann Arbor, Michigan
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister

'4

I

90 REWARD
BILL FORD, age 27, height 6'1", eyes blue, occu-
pation . . . announcer WOIA presenting "Revolving,
Bandstand." Find this man Saturday, July 25.
leward . .. 90 dollars cash.
JII THF NI! Fveryone is eligible to olav and

I

306 North Division Street

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E( - - ., ..

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