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July 22, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEIDNESUAY . JUt."

Title Contest Postponed Again

MONTREAL ({P) - The light-
heavyweight title fight between
Archie Moore and Canada's chal-
lenger Yvon Durelle was postponed
for a second time yesterday after
the champion left here abruptly to
be at the bedside of his wife in San
Diego, Calif.
Originally scheduled for July 15
and then set back two weeks when
Moore suffered a minor injury in
training, the bout now is set for
Aug. 12 at the Montreal Forum.
Mrs. Moore recently underwent
surgery for the removal of a non-
malignant mastoid tumor. Her
condition is reported to be satis-
factory. But Moore hurried home
after receiving a telephone call
from Dr. Kenneth Cales, who told
him. "Archie, you ought to be
here."
The champion caught a plane,
taking only his hat and coat. On
his arrival at San Diego he paused
only long enough to say "all my
fight plans are up in the air for
the present" before hurrying to
the hospital.
Earlier he had told sports editor
Jack Murphy of the San Diego
Union by telephone:
"It's not a tough decision for
me. I must- be at my wife's side.
They'll have to set the fight back.
There's no alternative but another
postponement."
Chris Shaban, Durelle's man-
ager, first threatened to claim the
title for the Bale Ste. Anne, N. B.
fisherman if Moore didn't go
through with the fight on sched-
ule.
"If he wants another delay, let
him fight as leading contender and
Durelle as champ," Shaban said.
Later Shaban agreed to the sec-
ond postponement.
Both Durelle and Shaban went
to great lengths to express their
ila jor Leag ue
Standings
AMERICAN" LEAGUE

sympathy for Moore after they
learned the extent and seriousness
of Mrs. Moore's operation.
"It could have been my wife,"
said Durelle. "I don't blame Archie
for going."
"We want Archie to know he has
our sympathy," said Shaban.
Earlier in the day when Shaban
was talking about claiming the
title, Gene Letourneau, chairman
of the Canadian Boxing Federa-
tion, was asked for comment.

"It is up to the National Boxing
Assn. in the United States to make
a decision in such a matter after
taking into consideration the views
of all parties concerned," he said.
"The Canadian Federation has no
jurisdiction over a world title fight,
only Canadian title bouts."
Durelle will fly to Baie Ste. Anne.
New Brunswick today. He will rest
for a few days before returning to
Montreal to resume training. -

A CHANGED MAN:
Olmedo Victorious
I n Grass Court M(uch

INDUCTED INTO HALL OF FAME-Former Brooklyn Dodgers
outfielder Zack Wheat, now 71, holds plaque denoting his election
to the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, N.Y., July 2Q. He has a
lifetime batting average of .317, finishing his career in 1927 with
the Philadelphia A's.
Coast Granda C redited
With Swiniining Advan.f . I11ces

HAVERFORD, Pa. (IP) - Alex
Olmedo, Wimbledon titleholder
from Arequippa, Peru, was a
changed man yesterday when he
set out in quest of the Pennsyl-
vania Lawn Tennis championship
with a 6-1, 6-1 victory over Mac
White of Austin, Tex., in the first
round at Merton Cricket Club.
It was the first competition for
the top seeded Davis Cup star
since he 'was charged with throw-
ing his match last week ip the
National Clay Court Tournament
at Chicago.
He was a determined hitter
yesterday and played with en-
thusiasm and punch to run up 61
points while holding the Univer-
sity of Texas player to 31 points.
Olmedo ran out each set from
1-1,
Two other Davis Cutp team-
mates, Barry MacKay of Dayton,
Ohio, and Earl Buchholz, Jr., St.
Louis, also advanced. MacKay, de-
fending champion seeded second,
blasted through Don Ralph, Be-
thesda, Md., 6-2, 6-2. Eighteen-
year-old Buchholz scored by 6-0,
6-3, over Robert Potthast, Wauke-
sha, Wis.
Hard courts at Merion Cricket,
Haverford College, Bryn, Mawr
College and Haverford School were
used when Merion's grass surface
was too wet from Monday's heavy
rainfall.
Abe Segal, the South African
who was the victor over Olmedo
in last week's much discussed

REDDINd, Calif. ()-As teen-
aged ,girls shattered records in all
directions during this year's Na-
tionaf AAU Swimming Meet here,

match, scored by 6-2, 6-0 over Leif

Beck, Philadelphia.
Sally Moore, Bakersfield, Calif..
and Gwyneth Thomas, Shaker
Heights, Ohio, were the only mem-
bers of the women's seeded cast
whose matches were deferred until
today. They flew in from Chicago
where Miss Moore won the U.S.
Clay Court title.
Victorious in straight sets were
these seeded players:
Margaret Varner, Wilmington,
Del.; Donna Floyd, Arlington, Va.;
Karol Fageros, Miami, Fla.; Mrs.
Adrienne Ayares, Baltimore; Car-
ole Wright, Brooklyn; and Karen
Hantze, San Diego, Calif.
. . C 1 1
Tr yous Set
NEW YORK (tP)-Final tryouts
for the U.S. Olympic boxing teanrl
will be held in San Francisco in
May, J. Lyman Bingham of the
U.S. Olympic Committee said yes-
terday. No definite date was set
but Bingham indicated the bouts
likely would be held in the middle
of the month.
The Eastern regional finalists
will be determined at Louisville
and the Western representatives
will be selected at Pocatello, Idaho.
The regionals will be held either
late in April or early May, Bing-
ham added.

4
-t

r

a stocky grandmother
from the sidelines.

beamed

Nodak Coach
Gets Pro Job
DENVER JP) - Robert H. May,
32, coach of North Dakota's Na-
tional Collegiate Hockey cham-
pions, signed a three-year con-
tract yesterday to coach the Den-
ver team in the International
Hockey League.
He met with Gene Clift, presi-
dent of Mile High Hockey Inc.,
which Saturday ;was granted a
franchise in the league.
"I'm really enthusiastic about
this opportunity," May said. He
will begin immediately to recruit
"an aggressive, young team," and
hopes to land some former play-
ers' from North Dakota,. Denver,
Colorado College and other west-'
ern schools.h
After coaching high school
hockey in North Dakota and Min-
nesota five years, May became the
North Dakota coach in 1957. His
team won the Western Intercol-
legiate League title in 1958 and
was runnerup to Denver in the
NCAA playoffs, then captured the
national title last March.
May, a native of Winnipeg,
Manitoba, is married and has two
children. He is now an American
citizen.

First it was back in 1951 that
Mrs. Beth Kaufman of San An-
selmo, Calif., got over her idea of
age-group swimming competition
so that youngsters throughout the
nation could compete against oth-
ers their own age.
Now such great young cham-
pions and record holders as Sylvia
Ruuska of Berkeley, Chris Von
Saltza of Saratoga, Calif., and
Becky Collins of Indianapolis re-
flect the value of the early train-
ing.
Beth, who has nine grandchil-
dren, heads the AAU's age-group
swimming program nationally.
She says she helped promote the
activity because "the little kids
weren't getting a good chance to
compete."
She got the Idea when her
daughter was 12 and had to com-
pete against seniors.
"Now the youngsters are get-
ting better training and a chance
to compete where they belong,"
she explains.
Competitions start with the 10
and under group and go up in
brackets of two years.
"So Johnny is a hot-shot at 10.
Then he reaches 11 and has to
compete with ~12-year-olds so he
has to work all the harder on his
swimming," Beth explains.
"This program gives us an ear-
ly chance to train boys and girls
who will represent this nation in
the Olympics. These kids learn to
take a beating and how to win
graciously."

Cleveland
Chicago
Baltimore
New York
washington
Detroit
Kansas City
Boston

w
51
52
48
46
43
44
41
40

L
38
39
44
46
48
50
49
51

Pct.
.573
.571
.522
.540
.473
.468
.456
.440

GB
41A2
6 2
9
9 j
12

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 8, Baltimore 1
Cleveland 5, New York 1
Detroit 8, Washington 1
Chicago 2, Boston 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Kansas City (N)
New York at Cleveland (N)
Washington at Detroit
Boston at Chicago

NATIONAL LEAGUE

San Francisco
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Philadelphia

w
52
53
49
46
46
45
41
36

L
41
43
44
42
46
47
50
55

Pct.
.559
.552
.527
.523
.500
.489
.451
.396

GB
-
3
3
10
15

SAMZ'S STORE
MEN'S WEAR
Bigger Discount
13argains

'4

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 1, San Francisco 0
Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 6
Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 2
Cincinnati 12, Milwaukee 2
Chicago 8, St. Louis 2
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at San Francisco (N)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (N)
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (N)
Chicago at Los Angeles (NY

CAMPUS BOOT ERY
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for Ann
WOMEN'S FOOTW E AR
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White, Biege, Spectators, Black, Blue, Patents
CASUALS, FLATS-3.90, 4.90
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Shells, Ties, Wedge Sandals, Dress Flats
in Black, Beige, Patent, White, Red
WASHABLE CASUALS Keddettes-$2.99
Oomphies-$4.90
MEN'S SHOES
350 PAIRS . .. 7'0 and $990
by Weyenberg, Mansfield Reg. to $14.95

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