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July 21, 1959 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1959-07-21

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y {

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. JULY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY JPLV

NAB AJa

iver Overcomes Mexican Champion

I

SIFIED

EXICO CITY P).-Rod Laver,
-year-old Queensland rookie,
?d a tense, comeback victory
Mexican champion Antonio
fox, 6-3, 6-8, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3 yes-
ay which sent Australia into
second round of the American
Davis Cup tennis competi-
7e Australians, hoping to
lenge for the big silver bowl,
to the United States last year,
fly immediately to Montreal
e they will play Canada July
ver's magnificent triumph on
red-clay court of the Chapul-
c Sports Center redeemed his
ing-day loss in singles and
gave his team a 3-1 lead
VeWo
wiets Sa
)NDON () - Moscow Radio,
r1ay ignored the separate
system of scoring used in
lay's United States - Russia
s and women's track meets
hailed the result as a "major
deserved victory" for the So-
Union.
e men's and women's events
scored separately in Phila-
ila, not combined as the Rus-
chose to do last year over.
rican protests.
e American men won Sunday
.08 and the Russian women
67-40. The combined scores
175 for Russia and 167 for the
ed States.
e situation was similar to that
oscow last year when the Rus-
claimed a 172-170 victory on
-44 margin for their women
a 126-109 triumph for the
ed States men.
scow Radio said tlhe result
"a great success for Soviet
athletes and their trainers
our home sports as a whole."

i

which reduced the final singles
match to a mere formality.
In this one, Roy Emerson, sub-
bing for the ailing Neale Fraser,
was sent against 31-year-old
Mario Llamas, who' cut down
Laver Saturday in straight sets.
Important to Australians
This was a close squeak and an
important triumph for the mighty,
tennis-minded ' Australians. They
have not been shut out of thet
challenge round in 22 years, and
have won the Davis Cup seven of
the last nine times.
They met a well-conditioned
and inspired Mexican team on
Mexican conditions - a 1 mile
high atmosphere which gives the
ball a tendency to float and a clay
court to which the visitors were
not accustomed.
Also favoring the Mexicans was;
a fiery, highly excitable and vocal
gallery which cheered and jeered
throughout the three-day's play
as they might demonstrate in a
bull ring.
Laver, Wimbledon runnerup re-
cently to Peruvian Alex Olmedd,
had to weather a bit of serving
wildness and flashes of Palafox
brilliance in pulling out the 21/2-
hour match.

Harry Hopman, Australian cap-
tain, said Fraser had a mild re-
currence early yesterday of the
appendicitis attack which struck
him last week. "The doctor said
Neale was okay," Hopman said. "I
only would have used him if we
had lost the fourth match."
Poor volleying and flubbed
overheads cost Palafox the first
set in which he lost his service in
the first and ninth games.

The second set was a thriller,
following service until the 11th
game, Laver, double faulting
twice, was down love-40 but he

beautiful passing shots and then
held service for the set.
The Mexican champion was at
his best in the third set when,
after splitting service breaks in

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

fought gamely to deuce the game the first two games, he took Lav-
and have game advantage five er's delivery in the fifth with the
times before Palafox smashed loss of only one point and then
through for a break. held on the rest of the way. In
Laver re-broke in the next the eighth game he almost let
game to makge the score 6-6, but Laver level the set in a marathon
young Palafox cracked Laver which went to six deuces and four
again in the 13th with a series of Palafox adds.

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.80
.96
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
.39
.47
.54

DEFEATS REED:
Bartzen Retains Clay Court Crown
A ______________________________________________

Call
and

Figure 5 average words to a 'fine.
Classified between 1:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
9:00 and 1 1 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

CHICAGO (M)-Bernard (Tut)
Bartzen, 31-year-old southpaw
from Dallas, yesterday retained
his National Clay Court Tennis
Crown by blasting out Whitney
Reed, Alameda, Calif., 6-0, 8-6,
7-5.
The victory was the third in
this tournament for the No. 3
seeded Bartzen.'s
He also won in 1954.
Fourth seeded Sally Moore of
Bakersfield, Calif., 19-year-old
sophomore at Occidental College,

took the women's- title by defeat-
ing Sandra Reynolds, 19-year-old
African beauty, 6-2, 2-6, 6-3.
The 26-year-old Reed, recently
crowned NCAA champ from San
Jose State, lost the first nine
games to the nimble Bartzen, in-
cluding the 6-0 whitewash in the
first set.
In the second set, Reed, began
rushing the net drawing even at
5-5 and going ahead 6-5.
This is the only time Reed, who
found it nearly impossible to get

GETS OFF FLOOR:
Gomes Beats Jorgenson for Fight Title

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (JP)-Durable
Harold Gomes survived four
knockdowns to punch out a unan-
imous 15-round decision over Paul
Jorgenson and win the vacated
world junior lightweight cham-
pionship last night.
Gomes weighed 127%, Jorgen-
son 1291.
In a wild battle which found
both exhausted contestants draped
over the ropes at the finish, the'
25-year-old Providence city sani-
tation department employe came

orld Records Broken
t U.S.-Japanese Meet.

back from dreamland's door after
taking thr'ee 8 counts in the 11th
round.
Gomes went down again in the
15th from a Jorgenson right hand
but turned on his Port Arthur,
Texas, adversary and gave him a
terrific pounding before the rope-
crashing finish.
Referee .Sharkey Buonanno
scored the fight 71-63 for Gomes
on the five-point-per-round scor-
ing system. Judges Dick Cotter
and Eddie Jansen had it 70-63
and 70-66 respectively for the
first titlist since Sandy Saddler
in 1949.
Buonanno took away the fifth
and seventh rounds from Jorgen-
son for low blows but Gomes had
won them on all cards anyway.
Gomes built a big lead early as
he befuddled the 25-year-old part
time businessman by alternating
left and right hand leadsThe
local boy had whipped Jorgenson
last March in a televised bout by
employing right hand leads. This
time he kept Paul off balance.
It was in the 11th that Jorgen-;
son; who had shown fight camp
observers nothing of a right hand

during his training period, took
the wraps off his secret weapon.
Jorgenson did everything but
take into account Gomes' remark-
able courage and staying power.
Jorgenson decked Gomes with
two stiff rights to the head early
in the 11th. Paul went down under
another right. The third time he
was on the ropes when he was
half clubbed by both hands and
half wrestled to the canvas. Gomes
was stretched on the canvas, blood
gushing from his mouth and -left
eye, apparently done.
When he lifted his head, he
shook himself out of a fog, jumped"
to his feet and answered with
jolting rights. out of instinct
against Jorgenson who by this
time had, punched himself into
fiat-footed exhaustion.
Gomes began to close Jorgen-
son's left eye in the sixth round.
Jorgenson opened a cut on the
outside of Gomes' left eye in the
eighth and both fighters tried to
work on these targets the rest of
the way.
Besides losing two rounds, Jor-
genson was warned in three other
rounds about bringing up his body
$unches.

the ball past the catlike Bartzen,
was ahead in the match. He lost
the next three games of the sec-
ond set.
Reed battled from behind in
the third set to deadlock it at 5-5,
but Bartzen's remarkable retriev-
ing broke him down as he swept
the last two games to close out
the match.
In the women's showdown, the
outclassed Miss Reynolds dis-
played a nice bit of sportsman-
ship in the deciding set.
With the match square, each
with a set and each with a game
in the third set, Miss Moore, lead-
ing 40-love, barely cleared the net
with a soft shot.
/ Rushing to the net, Miss Rey-
nolds returned the shot and the
line judge called the point for
her.
That would have given Miss
Reynolds a point to pull out the
game.
But the blond South African
lassie turned to the match ref-
eree, explaining she had touched
the net with her racket.
This gesture automatically cost
her the point, and the game, as
Miss Moore went on to run out
the set and take the match.
Miss Reynolds teamed up with
her South African chum,. Rene
Schuurman, to win the women's
doubles championship. They de-
feated Janet Hopps of Seattle and
Jeanne Arth of St. Paul, 4-6, 6-0,
6-3.
Fame Gae
Ends in Tie
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (IP) -
Five home runs sailed out of
Doubleday Field yesterday as the
Pittsburgh Pirates and the Kansas
City Athletics battled to a 5-5
standoff In the annual Hall of
Fame Game.
The exhibition was called in the
sixth inning because of rain.
The Pirates held a 5-2 lead after
five innings, but the Athletics came
up with three runs in the sixth to
tie the count. The A's had the
bases loaded with two out when a
heavy shower halted play. After
a wait. of 30 minutes the game
was called off.
Bill Mazeroski hit two home runs
for the Pirates and Bill Virdon
socked one. All of them came
against Howard Reed, a rookie
right hander. Joe Demaestri and
Harry Chiti homered for the Ath-
letics. A crowd of 8,714 attended
the exhibition, which climaxed the
induction of Zack Wheat into the
Hall of Fame.
Mazeroski put the Pirates in
front in the second with his first
homer. The A's tied the score in
their half of the frame when
Wayne Terwilliger singled home
Bob Cerv.

BUSINESS SERVICES
HOME LATE?
CUPBOARDS BARE?
You can shop at Ralph's 'till 12
midnight for all grocery supplies.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
"Just two doors from the Blue Front"
J9
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J5
PRECISION
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
Beautiful styling
GERMAN OLYMPIA
SWISS H ERMES
ITALIAN OLIVETTI
SMITH-CORONA

.. .. '

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
NEW ATLAS TIRES
"Gripsafe" in sets of 4; 4-870x15,
$58.75; 750x14, $74.95; (plus recap-
able tires and tax). Otherrsizes
comparably low. Tune-ups. Brake
service.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Cor. Main & Catherine NO 8-7717
83
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Frtendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and aceessor-
les. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanio
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!,,
1220 S.niversity atForest
NO 8-9168
62
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
S1
FOR RENT
LARGE 3 bedroom house, fireplace, ap-
pliances. $165 per month. NO 3-8677.
C31
CLOSE TO CAMPUS
Attractive, 3 rooms and private
bath. Clean and nicely furnished.
Phone NO 3-5372. C30
APARTMENT. Brand new furniture,
five blocks south of campus. Large
living room, good sized bedroom,
separate kitchen, private bath. Avail-
able now. $110 per month for year
lease or reduced rent for summer.
Call Oscar. Spaley days, NO 3-0501;
evenings, NO 2-5930. C28
DELUXE 3 room furnished apartment
includes heat and water. Semi-private
bath facilities. $90 a month. NO
2-9020. 027
4 ROOMS, first floor, across from Rack-
ham. $100 a month. Unfurnished.
Available August 1st. NO 3-2836.
C26
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. % block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. 012
ROOMS FOR MEN: Quiet. Campus area.
Linens furnished. Low rent. NO 3-4747.
015
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 8-7089 or 3-3280.
C1

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Try Hammond's new play time plat.
Includes organ in your home for 30
days with 6 free lessons in our
studio for only $25.
Rent a Spinet piano of your own
choice-$0 per month.
GRI NNELL'S
322 S. Main NO 2-5667
X3
Complete line of HiFi components
including kits; complete service on
radio, phonographs and HiMi equip-
ments.
HI Fl STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
Phone NO.8-7942
X2
FOR SALE
IDEAL for young couple. 3 year old,
35 foot Mobile home in excellent
condition on beautiful private wooded
lot. Including 35x8 concrete patio
with aluminum awning, new carpet-
ing. Lake and dock privileges, white
wooden boat with new 3 HP motor.
Leaving town. Phone HI 9-4201. B13
3 SIAMESE kittens, male and female,
about 4 months old. Also stud service.
Phone NO 2-9020. B12
DISPOSING of part of a large library
at private sale. There are books on
every subject among' thousands of
books collected for 65 years. Show-
ings at 617 Packard St. from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. every day except Sunday.
Reasonable prices. 81i
FOR SALE: % ton quiet, automatic
room air conditioner. Used 3 months.
Call NO 3-0047 after 5. B8
NEW CARS
in
" A Ford Product
" 1.4 models to choose from
*Prices start $1474
" Up to 35 miles per galion
" Easy Parking and Driving
" Good Trade-in Allowance
F ITZGERALD,
INC.
LINCOLN-MERCURY
EDSEL ENGLISH FORD
3345 Washtenaw
Phone NO 3-4197
V1
HELP WANTED
SMOKERS
Subjects who smoke cigarettes
needed for behavioral study. $1.25
per }your, call NO 3-1531, Ext. 387
or sign up in the Personnel Office,
Rm. 1020, Administration Bldg. H13
-U

and the

TOKYO (M--Two world records
re bettered and Australian
ympic champion Murray Rose
)n the fastest ,500-meter race
his career yesterday to steal
e opening-night show of the
ited States-Japan aquatic meet.
Mike Troy, 19-year-old Indian-
olis, Ind., sensation, stroked the
)-meter butterfly in 2:17.2, bet-
ing the International Swim-
rg Federation's 2:19 world
,ndard for the second time this
nmer. His recent 2:16.4 clock-
(, which won the AAU cham-
nship in Los Angeles, already
up for recognition as a world
rk.
ro 8,000 cheering Japanese, the
-star with Rose of the thrill-
eked evening was 20-year-old
uyoshi Yamanaka. He bettered
own 2:03 world record by win-
g the 200-meter free style in
'2.3, and scarcely two hours
er was second in the gruelling
00, half a body length behind
blond Australian.
Yamanaka's performances, and
apanese upset in a photo-finish
'-meter medley relay, put Japan,

g

in a 14-9 lead, with two days re-
maining in this fifth meeting of
the two swimming powers since
1931.
Besides Troy's butterfly win in
an event long dominated by the
Japanese, the second American
victory was by AAU springboard
diving champioh Don Harper,
formerly of Ohio State. Harper
outscored Sihnsuke Kaneto of'
Japan 155.07 to 132.11 in the
3-meter springboard dive.
Rose, Olympic runnerup, Yama-
naka and Somers all turned in the
best times of their careers in the
1,500. Setting both new American
and Japanese records, their times
have been bettered, only by Aus-
tralian Jon Konrads' 17:28.7 world
mark.
Rose, a student at the Univer-
sity of Southern California, started
slowly but spurted into the lead
after 1,200 meters, then fought off
a terrific final spurt by Yamanaka
to- win in 17:46.5. Yamanaka was.
timed in 17:47.5, and Somers in
17:48.9. Veteran American star
George Breen, like Somers repre-
senting the Indianapolis Athletic
Club, finished fourth in 17:59.
Rose was swimming as a guest in~
the 1500 meter, so in the team
scoring Yamanaka was credited as
the victor.
The Japanese 400-meter medley
relay team was in the good time of
4:15, a new Japanese record..

Smith-Corona Electric Portable
ONE YEAR GUARANTEE
MORRILL'S
314 South State NO 3-2481
J10
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD: Class ring 1960. Gold with
green stone, St. Thomas. Please turn
in to Michigan Union. A2
PERSONAL
PICK UP 90 CLAMS
Easy. No strings. Check your wire-
less, 1290 K.C., daily for clues.
WOIA Missing Man Contest, man
P22
BARGAIN CORNER-
MEN'S SKIP-dent short-sleeve sport
shirts. $1.39, 2 for $2.50. Wash 'n Wear,
sanforized, assorted colors. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W1

A

Freebooter Leads Pack
In Mackinac Yacht Classic
(.

..

MACKINAC ISLAND (MP - Thev
10-meter sloop Freebooter owned
by Bob and Max Pohn -of Chicago,
yesterday was reported leading
the fleet some 75 miles short of
the finish of the Chicago to
Mackinac Island Yacht Race.
Freebooter was sighted off South
Fox Island in the Manitou Pas-
sage some three miles in front of
six other boats. Race officials now
expect the 33-mile Lake Michigan
race to end sometime after mid-
night.
Favorable southerly winds
pushed the big yachts along at 8
to 10 m.p.h.
Close behind the Freebooter
were the Giant Sabre, owned by
Ramon Brotz of Sheboygan, Wis.,
previously unreported yesterday;

ay

Referee,

the Gipsy, owned by Charles
Kotovic of Milwaukee, Hugh
Schaddelee's Hilaria of Macatawa
,Bay, Mich.; the Dyna of Detroit,
Masker and Nimbus.
Trailing some 15 miles behind
Freebooter off North Manitou Is-
land were the Feather, Barb, Car-
ibe, Keewaydin, Esbro, Marlin,
Roma Aja, and Telemark.
Others in the 73 ship starting
fleet trailed furthe' behind the
Class A Freebooter.
Officials said Feather, a yawl,
and the smallest boat entered in
this year's race, now had the best
chance of being the corrected
time winner of the event. The
Feather has a large handicap over
the big yachts leading the race
including some 15 hours over
Sabre, the largest ship in the fleet.
The haul up the lake usually
takes 50 to 60 hours. The schoon-
er Amorita holds the record of
31.14.30 set in 1911.'

SUBJECTS NEEDED,
for psychological experiments at the Mental Health Re-
search Institute. $1 .00-$1.25 per hour.
Applications are available in Rm 1020 of the Ad-
ministration Bldg., or call NO 3-1431, Ext. 387.
}H2

orey

j

SUPREMACY
in Hair Styling
stands out predominantly
when done Here.
715 North University

Says

MONTREAL VP) - Red Storey,
whose resignation as referee from
the National Hockey League last
spring set off a whirlwind of ex-
citement, would consider resum-
ing a referee role - in football.
"Don't misunderstand me,"
said the big redhead yesterday.
"I'm not trying to start some-
thing. No. football people have ap-
proached me and I haven't ap-
proached them.
"You asked the question. I'm
interested in all sports and if I
were offered a football job I'd
consider it. But I imagine it's a
little late to speculate on that;
I'd think the football people are
all set up for the season."
31"fjor League
Standings
L <_
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cleveland 50 38 .568
Chicago 51 39 .567 -
Baltimore 48 43 .527 3x,/
New York 46 45 .505 5%
Washington 43 47 .478 8
Detroit 43 50 .462 9%
Kansas City 40 49 .449 10%
Boston 40 50 .444 11
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Kansas City (N)
New York at Cleveland (N)
Boston at Chicago (N)

>I
t
t'

FOR NATIONALIST CHINA:
Olympic Committee
Supports Recognition

PHILADELPHIA W) - The ex-
ecutive board of the U. S. Olym-
pic Committee yesterday urged
immediate action by the Inter-
national Olympic Committee to
recognize the Nationalist Chinese
under their rightful name - the
Republic of China Olympic Com-
mittee.
The IOC last May at a meeting
in Munich, Germany, withdrew
recognition of the Chinese Na-
tional Olympic Committee. Otto
Mayer, chancellor of the IOC,
said the Nationalists would be re-
admitted only if they dropped any
reference to China in the name.
Subsequently, an application
under the name of the Republic
of China Olympic Committee was
rejected on the same grounds that
the committee does not control
athletics on the mainland. The
IOC action drew criticism from
President Eisenhower who said
the organization was meddling in
politics.

in the IOC under the name of its
country and should be recognized.
Kenneth L. (Tug) Wilson, pres-
ident of the U. S. Committee, said
his group is convinced that any
delay in reinstating the Nation-
alist Chinese would seriously
damage the Olympic movement.
Sunday, Avery Brundage, Amer
ican president of the IOC, assert-
ed that he would recommend and
support recognition for the Na-
tionalist Chinese under the name,
Republic of China.
Brundage has contended Presi-
dent Eisenhower and the Ameri-
can people misunderstood the in-
tent of the IOC in its Munich ac-
tion. He said the IOC was trying
to stay out of politics and that its
aim was not to bar the Nationalist
Chinese but to effect a compro-
mise that would allow them to re-
main in the IOC.
The U. S. committee engaged in
a day-long session to consider
surh other nnhlpm . - +p Pcm

(Men's Styles),
Our summer clearance of assorted groups
from our high-grade men's stocks. This in-
cludes summer styles and scattered sizes in
regular weight oxfords. WelI-known shoes by
French-Shriner, G. H. Bass and Wright Arch-
THESE ARE ALL GROUPED INTO TWO (2)
PRICES:
Every shoe is a REAL BARGAI
ยง 1* anrl i n r un n I i me n T? .

I.-
4.

x

*

MISSING'
$9O REWARD
TOM NOLAN, age 27, height 6'1", eyes blue,
occupation . . . announcer WOIA presenting "Sun-
rise Serenade." Find this man between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and sundown Tuesday, July 21st. Reward
. . . 90 dollars cash.
Join the fan. Everyone is eligible to nn and win

1

II!

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