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July 18, 1959 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-18

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4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUJRDAY, JUL. 811 ,ix.93

avLA1 VtlL1 10 1 7V 7

a

)N'T FEEL WELCOME AT TOURNEY:
Olmedo Turns Down Apology Offer

CHICAGO (0P)-:A regretful Alex
medo yesterday rdeclined to
>ologize in person for his humili-
ing showing -Thursday in the
itional Clay Courts Tennis Tour-
ament.
"I did not feel too welcome there
on the beginning, because I was
te,". Olmedo told the Associated
ress in his hotel room.
Meanwhile, Perry Jones, captain
the United States Davis Cup
eam, leveled criticism at tourna-
ent officials for not allowing
Imedo to play doubles after his
tless performance in losing to
be Segal from South Africa, 6-2,
1,.6-0.
Officials defaulted him and his
nocent doubles partner, Earl
Lchholz, Jr. of St. Louis, in the
nterests of better tennis for the
ectators and the players."
Jones said yesterday:
"It all would have blown over

if they had let Alex come back to
the court Thursday, make a little
speech that he was sorry, and then
redeem himself by playing."
Olmedo, of Los Angeles and
Peru, accused officials of "treating
me cruelly when I missed the first
two days of the tournament."
He added:
"I was late arriving from Euro-
pean competition, and I was tired
trom traveling and everything.
Then I played four matches the
first day (Wednesday), and I did
not realize that I was so tired
Thursday.
"I am very sorry that everything
happened. I hope that it won't
happen again in the future. I
know it was a very bad thing.
Cup Team Lost
"But I don't think it would be
nice for me to appear at the tour-
nament to say anything. The offi-

1 cials also were sore because they
lost the whole Davis Cup team."
(All four competing Davis Cup
players were defeated in singles
play.)
"This would not have been so
big if it weren't me," added the
recent Wimbledon Champion and
1958 Davis Cup star.
C. P. Hennessy, tournamentj
chairman, said he did not believej
it would do anyone any good for
Olmedo to return to the River,
Forest Tennis Club and make a
public apology.,
"It is too late to repair the dam-
age he did to tennis in the eyes
of those kids who saw his per-
formance Thursday," Hennessy
said.
"Besides, it would be a terrible
humiliation for someone to make
such a public apology on a tennis
court. He never would be able to

INEST ATHLETES GATHER:
U TS .- Russian Meet Be s Today

PHILADELPHIA (W')--,The
United States and Russia clash to- States. Last year in Moscow in the
Lay in a duel meet that brings to- first meeting of. the 'two national
ether most of the world's best teams the United States men won
nen and women in track and field. 126-109 but the Russian women
America is favored to win in the triumphed 63-44. Russia insisted
nen's everts and Russia in the on combining the two scores for
women's in the two day' competi- a Soviet victory of 172-170.
ion which, with good weather, The powerful Russian team in-
hould draw 40,000 both days to cludes such stars as Igor Kash-
Franklin Field.' karov, who has high jumped 7.
The forecast for the 'weekend is feet :/2 inch; Vasily Kuznetsov,
rood. Rain has fallen off and on who has bettered the world record
nost of the week but stopped to- in the decathlon; and Igor Ter-
lay. Ovanesyan, a 26-foot broad Jump-
This is the first time Russia has er.
ent a track team to the United The United States is counting
Calh ouna .Decisions .Tier
In Dull Middleweight F1ht

SYRACUSE, N. Y.,(k')-Middle-'
weights Rory Calhoun and Dick
Tiger dawdled through ten rounds
with Calhoun taking a split and,
disputed decision last night.
Each weighed 162 pounds.
Fraser Fit,
Doctors, Say
MEXICO cITY (R-Austra a's
No. 1 are, -Neale Fraser, was pro-
nounced physically fit yesterday-
for the vital Davis Cup tennis
serie8 with Mexico and the Aussies'
concern shifted to the trivial mat-
ter of racket strings.
Some observers figured this first.
round American zone battle open-
ing today might swing on the
tightness or looseness of the sheep'
gut in the Australians' bats.
Fraser will meet the young Mex-
ican National Champion; Antonio
Palafox, in the opening singles
match at 2 p.m. EST, at the
multi-million dollar Chapultepec
Sports Center. The second match
sends Red Laver, Australia'sWim-
bledon' runner-up, against Mario
Llamas, 31-year-old 'veteran who
seldom loses a match on home
courts.
The latest doctor's examination
today disclosed Fraser 'apparently'
has recovered from the mild ap-
pendicitis attack, which struck
him earlier in the week. His blood;
count had returned to normal and'
he said he felt no more pain. {
Now the big question is can Aus-
'tralia's southpaws harness their
big game attack in the mile-high
atmosphere of this city enough
to thwart an upset plotted by thel
well conditioned and blade-sharpi
Mexicans.

The fight bore little resem-
blance to. the exciting draw the-
two fought five weeks ago in New
York's Madison Square Garden.
Laughs and boos greeted the
announcers' word that judges
Dick Fazio and Harold McGrath
had given Calhoun six rounds to
four for Tiger. Referee Joe Pal-
mer saw the fight 5-3-2 for Tiger,
the same as the AP.
The slim crowd booed and
clapped for action at the end of
the sixth, eighth and ninth rounds
of the nationally televised fight.
A flurry enlivened the. seventh,
Calhoun slipping, after taking a
right to .the face and dragging
Tiger ,to the mat atop him. Both
sprawled under the ropes. There
were no knockdowns:
The sleepy-eyed C a 1 h o u n,
counterpunching effectively, won
the last three rounds on the Mc-
Grath and Fazio- cards.
A last-minute rally had, helped
the 24-year-old Rory to his ear-
lier draw.

on veteran aces Harold Connolly
in the hammer, Al Oerter in the
discus, Greg Bell in the broad
jump, and. Parry O'Brien in the-
shot-all Olympic champions-to-
gether with such sensational
youngsters as Ray Norton in the
sprints; Tom Murphy in the 800,
and Al Cantello, who recently
threw the Javelin 282-31/2 to bet-
ter the world record.
In the women's, events the United
States is looking to Earlene Brown
in the weights, Isabelle Daniels in
the 200, and Wilma Rudolph in
the 100 for points.
One of the blue ribbon events
should be the pole vault. Russia
has a 15-foot pole vaulter in Vladi-
mir Bulatov, but the USA's Don
Bragg, who set a world indoor
record at 15-9%, should stop him.
The high Jump brings together
two men who have bettered the
magic seven foot mark - Kash-
karov and Charles Dumas of the
United States.,
The decathlon has the most
thrilling event of the meet; John
Thomas, who set a world record
in the. high jump at 7-1% ; and
Glenn Davis, world record holder:
in the 400 meter hurdles,
Opening ceremonies'; today are,
at 2 p.m. EST, but competition
starts in the broad jump at 1140
p.m. in order to give Russia's Ter-
Ovanesyan a chance to compete in
both this event and the decathlon.
The meet is sponsored by the
Philadelphia Inquirer Charities in
conjunction'. with' the Amateur
Athletic Union.
The; United States might sur-
prise' in the distances with Bill
Dellinger in the 5,000 and Dyrol
Burleson in the 1,500.
Powerful as is the American
team, some of the best of the na-
tion's stars are sidelined by in-
juries, including Bobby Morrow,
the Olympl6 100 and 200 meter
champion; Rafer Johnson, who
beat Kuznetsov last year in Mos.
cow in the decathlon.

play again after that. It would kill
him.
Olmedo said he did not know
how long he would stay in Chi-
cago, but he planned to compete
next week in the Pennsylvania
Grass Court tournament.
In Seattle, Victor Denny, pres-
ident of the U. S. Lawn Tennis
Assn., which has the power to im-
pose disciplinary bans on players,
said he had received no official
word of the River Forest incident.
He declined any immediate com-
ment.
"I feel sorry for Alex," said his.
Davis Cup team chum, Buchholz.
"I know how he felt. I felt that
way in Australia in a match.
Some days you just don't feel like
playing." ,
.Buchholz added that he felt no
resentment toward the top-seeded
peruvian because their doubles
team was defaulted.
Jones attributed Olmedo's per-
formance, which drew boos and
catcalls from the spectators, to
"tremendous pressures," that his
star' has Jbeen under since becom-
ing possibly the world's greatest
amateur player during the past
year.
Charles Hare, former British
tennis star and a close friend of
Olmedo, attributed Alex's beha-
vior to the pressures of publicity
and fame that came his way so
quickly.
"The boy came here from a
humble home in Peru," Hare
said. "Then he suddenly became
a star within less than a year.
Ann--Arborite
Loses Match
JACKSON (M)-Mrs. Lewis God-
dard of Birmingham won the
Michigan Women's Golf Cham-
pionship here yesterday by trounc-
ing Mrs. C. U. Wilson of Ann
Arbor, 8 and 6.
It was the most decisive victory
in the history of the 43-year-old.
tournament and marked the first
time a public course player had
wone the title.
Mrs. Goddard; 45-yr.-old mother
of 3 children, rolled up a 4-hole
lead in the first 18 holes with 42-
41-83. She quickly boosted this
to 8 in the afternoon and closed
out the match by winning the
28th and 29th holes with pars.
Eajor League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

BUSINESS SERVICES

Don't Miss those
Vacation "Buys"
at
THE DILLON
SHOPS
JULY SALE
Sizes for tall, short
and between.
Reductions of
12and below.
J20
COMPUTING, statistical analysis, IBM
650 programming performed for any
field. NO 5-6713. J17
FOR TODAY'S breakfast why not buy
some lox, cream cheese, bagels, onion
rolls, or assorted Danish pastry? Plan
ahead also . . . later in the week
we'll have smoked whitefish, gefitle
fish,, kosher, soups, pastrami, and
corned beef. Shop 'atRalph's for these
delicious foods.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard N02-3175

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 average words to a tine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
HELP WANTED
MEAL JOB available. 836 Tappan. NO
8-6543: H12
SALESMAN WANTED: Part time, must
be available Monday evenings, Satur-
days, and some afternoons. Must be
neat looking and personable. Ideal
for person who .has peveral more
years of school and has to supplement
their income. Inquire at Ann Arbor
Clothing, 113 S. Main. H10
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accesor
les. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on4 new &
used tires. Road service-mechanio
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
62

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Try Hammond's new play time plan.
Includes organ in your home for 30
days, with 6 free lessons in our
studio; for only $25.
Rent a Spinet piano of your own
choice--$10 per month.
GRINNELL'S

322 S. Main

For Direct Classified Ad Service
PhoneNO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday thrv Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'till 11:30 A.M

NO 2-5667 1
X3

Complete line of HiFi components
including kits; complete service on
radio, phonographs and HiFi equip-
ments.
Hi l STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus-Theatre
Phone NO 8-7942
S2
USED CARS
ISETTA, four passenger, 1959. 50 mile
gallon. Must sell now! Call NO 2-8921
Saturday or Sunday. N21
1953 STUDEBAKER, 6 cylinder with
overdrive. $200. See between 5-6 P.M.
at 510-'Lawrene, apt. 6. N15
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classif ied Ads

FOR RENT-
APARTMENT. Brand new furniture,
five blocks south of campus. Large
living room, good sized bedroom,
separate kitchen, private bath. Avail-
able now. $110 per month for year
lease Or reduced rent for summer.
Call Oscar ?Spaley days, NO 3-0501;
evenings, NO 2-5930. C28
DELUXE 3 room furnished apartment
includes heat and water. Semi-private
bath facilities. $90 'a month. NO
2-9020. C27
4 ROOMS, first floor, across from Rack-
ham. $100 a month. Unfurnished.
Available August 1st. NO 3-2836.
C26
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. a block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. .-Cla
ROOMS FOR MEN: Quiet- Campus area.
Linens furnished. Low rent. NO 3-4747.
C15.
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 8-7089 or 3-3280.
C1
PERSONAL
PICK UP' 90 CLAMS
Easy. No strings. Check your wire-
less, 1290 K.C., daily for clues.
WOIA Missing Man Contest, mal
F22

I mm?

WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
South State NO 2-3350
81

J3 12007

Chicago
Cleveland
Baltimore
New York
Washington
Detroit
Boston
Kansas City

W
50
48
46
44
42
42
39
38

L
37
37
42
44
45
48
48
48

1i

I I

Pct.
.575
.565
.523
.500
.483
.461
.448
.442

GB
1
4
6%
8
91
11
11

TYPING: Thesis, Term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
J11
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J5
FOR SALE
IDEAL for young couple. 3 year old,
35 foot Mobile home in excellent
condition on beautiful private wooded
'lot. Including 35x8 concrete patio
with aluminum awning, new carpet-
ing. Lake and dock privileges, white
wooden boat with new 3 HP motor.
Leaving town. Phone HI 9-4201. B13
3 SIAMESE kittens, male and female,
about 4 months old. Also stud service.
Phone NO 2-9020. B12
DISPOSING of part of a large library
at private sale. There are books on
every subject among thousands of
books collected for 65 years. Show-
ings at 617 Packard St. from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. every day except Sunday.
Reasonable prices. Bll
FOR SALE: Brick house. 3 bedrooms,
separate dining room, full basement,
garage. Charming yard with small,
brick patio, large trees, shrubs and
flowers. Friendly, young neighbor-
hood. 2 blocks from elementary school.
House is clean and like new. Includes
dishwasher, draperies, blinds. Call NO,
2-0849. B1O
FOR SALE: % ton quiet, automatic:
room air conditioner. Used 3 months.
Call NO 3=0047 after 5. B8
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD: Class ring.1960. Gold with
green stone, St. Thomas. Please turn
in to Michigan Union. A2
THE
GUILD HOUSE
524 Thompson
(Congregational, Disciples,
E. & H.).
SUNDAY 5:45
COST PICNIC
Celestine Fernando, Chaplain
University of Ceylon
"WORLD COMMUNITY.
do Christians really care?"

COET JC
ON) rTE SABBATHr

C.

Cone Sets Backstroke Mark
IWomen's Swim Contest

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 7, Washington 4
Baltimore 3, Detroit 2
Chicago 2, New York 0
Cleveland 8, Boston 7
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Washington
Chicago at 'New York
Cleveland at Boston
Detroit at Baltimore (2,N)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

REDDING, Calif. (AP) - Pretty
blond Carin Cone, who missed an
Olympic title by the length of a
fingernail in 1956, last night
smashed the world record in the
220 yard backstroke with a time
of two minutes 37.9 seconds in the
National AAU Women's Swim-
ming Championships.
The . 19-year-old from Ridge-
wood, N. J. representing the
Houston, Tex., Shamrock Club
since she attends Houston Uni-
versity, beat defending champion

TRANS-PACIFIC CLASSIC:
Nalu II Reported
Ynrl ' lrn~ Wh~ior

Chris Von Saltza and six others
in last night's finals.
Her time bettered the world
record of 2:38.5 set in 1957 by L.
De Nijs of Holland. Miss Cone
also surpassed the American and
meet record 'of 2:40.2 established
by Miss Von Saltza two years ago.
A crowd of 1,800 already had
seen Miss Von Saltza again win
the 110-yard freestyle in 1:04.8,
which lowered her American citi-
zen's record, and 14-year-old Ann
Warner win the 220-yard breast-
stroke. Miss Warner established
a meet and American record of
3:02.4.
Still, Miss Cone's great victory
topped the program on this sec-
ond of four night's action in the
55-yard Redding pool. She had'
lost the 100 meter backstroke title
to Judy Grinham of Great Britain
in 1956. Two Judges voted for the
English girl and one for the
American in the close finish.
Carin considers the shorter race
her best, but last night she wasn't
to be denied as she matched Miss
Von Saltza stroke for stroke for
55 yards. After the first turn she
forged steadily ahead.
West Leads
Utah Open

San. Francisco
Los Angeles
Milwau kee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Philadelphia

W
51
50
46
47
45
42
39
33

L'
38
41
39
42
44
46
5o
53

Pct.
.573
.549
.541
.528
.506
.47,7
.438
.384

GB
3
4
6
8/
12
16Y2

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 3, Lose Angeles 2
Chicago 1, Cincinnati 4
San Francisco 4, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Pittsburgh
Los Angeles at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Chicago
Milwaukee at St. Louis (N)

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
9:00 A.M. Service in Douglas Chapel.
11 :00 A.M. Service in the Sanctuary.
11:00 A.M. Service in the Sanctuary. Mr. Gray
Austin preaching: "The Universe and I."
Church School, crib through High School, 11:00
A.M.
Student Guild will hear Dr. Celestine Fernando,
U of M visiting Councelor from Ceylon. Cost
picnic at 5:45 P.M. Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY-
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service and Holy Com-
munion.
4:00 P.M. Outing at Hagen Farm-Traver
Rd. Discussion by International Students.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER,
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580 h
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Discussion:
FRIDAY-
6:30 P.M. Summer Fellowship Supper
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(Quakers)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Sunday:.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister-
Mr. Jack LaMar, Student Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH'
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. Bible classes.
10:30 A.M. Morning worship service.
7:00 P.M. Evening worship service. The Faith
of Our Fathers IV. "The Faith of a Normal
Mon."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hill and Tappan
Rev. Russell G. Fuller, Minister

tI

11

HONOLULU (AP)-Peter Grant's
46-foot sloop Nalu II is the appar-
ent -winner of the 21st Trans-
Pacific Yacht Race.'
The sloop from Newport Beach,
Calif., crossed the finish line of
the Los Angeles-to-Honolulu sail-
ing classic yesterday with a burst
of speed. That put her ,atop the
standings and assured her-all but
officially-of victory.
The official verdict will be an-
nounced when Officials decide no
other yacht has a mathematical
chance to best Nalu's handicap
time.
Twenty-two of the 41 starters
still were at sea.
With bespectacled, 31-year-old
Grant at the helm and his brother
Joe, .navigator for the crew of
seven, Nalu II covered the 2,225

Grant is an investment banker
and a veteran of 15 years of yacht
races in Bermuda, Acapulco and
other Trans-Pacifics. Nalu II took
second in the Trans-Pacific two
years ago.
In this one, she was 18th to
cross the finish line. Her handicap'
of a deductible three days, 10.
hours and 19 minutes enabled her
to beat out the Chubasco by two
hours and 24 minutes.
The 66-foot yawl Chubasco,
owned by Arnold Haskell, of New-
port Beach, and skippered by his
nephew, Donald, had been the
leader.

'I
4
r c.
"S.
.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
David Schramm, Vicar
Sunday at 10:45 A.M. Worship Service, with ser-
mopn by the pastor, "Imperatives Incumbent
on Christians."
Sunday at 9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
All-Day Outing at Bishop Lake near Brighton of
NE Region of Gamma Delta, with times of de-
parture from Center, 10:15 A.M. and 1:15
P.M.
ANN ARBOR REFORMED CHURCH
110 N. Fourth Ave.
Second floor, YM-YWCA
Reverend Raymond Weiss
10:00 A.M. Service: "God's Word and Prayer."
Nursery at 10:00.
7:30 P.M. Service: "The Christian Faith in Per-
spective."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.
and 12:00 noon.
Holiday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Lesson Sermon.
Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty. 10:00 A.M to
5:00 P.M. daily. Monday 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship:."Victims of To-
morrow," Dr. Rupert preaching.
9:30-10:30 A.M. Bible Study and Discussion.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School-University Class.
11M:00 A.M. "The Invisible War.
5,:45 P.M. Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. "The Strange Ways of God."
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Washington & 5th Ave.
10:00, A.M. Sunday School.
11 :00 A.M. Church.
7:30 P.M. Sunday Evening Worship.
THURSDAY-
7:30 'P M. Weekly Prayer Meeting.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
of Ann Arbor, Michigan
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister

I

A

it

A

SALT LAKE CITY, W-P-Form-
er. Utah CQrennhaw TJa' 'sixnlel Wpcf

A late report gave the 38-foot fired a blazing, 5-under-par 67
sloop Echo a mathematical chance yesterday to grab the first-round
of beating Nalu II. Race experts leady in the $7,500 Utah Open Golf
said she would have to make 7.6 Tournament.
knots all the way in. Echo is W
owned by Dr. Glen S. Harman of - -est, of Longview, Wash., shot

MISSING!~
SREWARD
JOHN SMALL, alias "Big" John Small, age 21,
height 5' 8", eyes baby blue, occupation,. .
announcer WOIA, presents "Melody Matinee."
Find this man between the hours of 10:0 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m. Saturday, July 18. Reward
90 dollars in cash.
Jin; theo fuin. Eve'rone iseliileto nlav and

9:00 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon' topic:
"Christian Love.. ." by Rev. Russell Fuller.
5:45 P.M. The Student Guild" will hear Dr.
Celestine Fernando of Ceylon. Picnic at Guild
House, 524 Thompson, will precede his talk.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FUONDATION
306 North Division Street

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