100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 10, 1958 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r/ITHE MICHIGAN DAILY ______________________________

oad Automobile Changes,
pear in 1959 Models,

Mie. Chiang Honored

By DAVID J. WILKIE
Issociated Press Automotive Editor
Broad appearance changes are
ning in the 1959 model automo-
es.
They were planned long before
e lag in new car sales began but
e industry hopes they will help
lster a sharp comeback next
ar. '
Some cars will be longer; a few
L be lower. Others will have
at appearance due to changes
their lines. There will be dras-
changes in front and rear
hting installations.
More Color
There will be more color combi-
tions. Most radiator grilles will
changed. More glass will be
ed. More aluminum will go into
rictional use as well as in trim
plications.
Most of General Motors' various,
es will be entirely new because
its new body shell that re-
ices two of the three currently
ed. Chevrolet, which had a com-
etely restyled car this year, gets
other one for 1959 as a result
the body change.
A whole new car in two succes-
'e years is unusual in the indus-
lomoco Tea
Co Be Give
omonorrow

try. Ford, which topped Chevro-
let in production and sales last
year, has been ousted from that
position by Chevrolet this year.
Ford Changes
In an effort to regain some of
its lost volume Ford is making
broad exterior design changes for(
1959.
Engineering changes will not
be nearly as extensive, although
there will be one new engine in
top Chrysler models and there will
be more pushbutton controls.
Tires on standard size cars will
remain at 15-inch and 14-inch di-
ameters. When the 14-inch wheels
were announced a couple of years
ago it was said there would be
further reduction to 13 inches.
So far no car maker has indi-
cated a 13-inch wheel is planned.
Lighting to Contribute
Over-all, the positioning of
front and rear lighting systems'
will contribute substantially to
the changed appearance of the
1959 models, More of the front,.
and rear lamps, positioned one
above the other, will be canted,
flaring out)Vard.
The rear fender fins that
sparked Chrysler's big showing in
1957 will be retained by all its
divisions for 1959 as will the
modified versions adopted by Ford
and Chevrolet. The outward flare
will be s o m ew h a t more pro-
nounced in the Ford models.
The Edsel car's gull-wing rear
lighting effect will be adopted,
with modifications, by several oth-
er makes. The Edsel will retain its
basic styling characteristics, in-
cluding the deep vettical oval in
in its front. .
Chrysler's several d i v i s o n s,
while retaining their basic styl-
ing, will strive for more individu-
ality through front and rear end
changes.
Pushbutton controls for heaters
and for locking and unlocking lug-
gage compartment lids without
leaving the cart will be innova-
tions in several lines.

"-Daily-William Kimball
AWARD GIVEN-Madame Chiang Kai-shek (right) smiles during
ceremonies at 'the University television studio, at which she re-
ceived a token from the business and Professional Women of Ann
Arbor. BPW president Ruth ;Hanson made the presentation.
OPENS TODAY-
Two Hundred To Participate
n Sunner Speech Session

The International Leaders Fel-
wship Unit of Homemakers and
others Cooperatives QLPU of
)MOCO) will honor "Big Par-
ts" at a Socio-Educational Fel-
wship Tea, at 4 p.m. tomorrow
the International Center.
Among the "Big Parents" to be
nored are University President
arlan Hatcher and Mrs. Hatch-
, International Center Director
mes Davis and Mrs. Davis, and
an of the School of Education
illard Olson and Mrs. Olson.

The Summer Speech Conferencef
which will have about 200 Univer-'
sity speech students and instruc-
tors as participants will be held
today and tomorrow at the Uni-
versity.
Sponsored by the speech de-
partment and the Summer Ses-
sion, the two-day conference,
which is open to the public, will
take place at the Rackham Build-
ing.
The meeting opens at 9 a.m.
today with the introduction of
conference participants to be fol-'
lowed by a debate and discussion
on "The Status of Debating: 1958."
Speaking will be Associate Di-
rector of the Summer Session,
Prof. N. Edd Miller, of the speech
department.
Following him will be Prof. Jon
Elsenson, director of the Speech

Clinic, Queens College, who will
lecture on "Perserveration and a'
Theory of Stuttering."
"Theater-Fine Art or Liberal
Art?" will be the topic on which
John E. Dietrich, director of
theater at Ohio State University
will comment.
Following a question period and
luncheon there will be a tele-
vision discussion featuring Sam-j
uel L. Becker, director of tele-
vision-radio-filmz at the University
of Iowa.}
Today's lecture series will end
with Prof. L. Lamont Okey of thef
speech department, who will dis-
cuss "The Bible: A Storehouse of
the Spoken Word."
A question period and tour of
the University campus will climax
the day's events.
E~mm innsm27fiismem.R

Festival Men
Regret Loss
O hrus
The Ann Arbor Youth Chorus
will, no longer be a part of the
University's annual May Festival.
By action of the Ann Arbor
Board of Education early in June,
the chorus, made up of local
school children 10 to 12 years old,
will no longer be sponsored by the
school board.
Charles A. Sink, president of
the University Musical Society
which sponsors the May Festival,
expressed regrets at the board's
decision. "We are very sorry to
hear the board has taken this ac-
tion because the Youth Chorus
has been an important part of the
May Festival for many years,"
Sink said.
Upset Program
Prof. Marguerite Hood of the
School of Music, chorus director,
explained that the rehearsals for
the annual program frequently
took up half the school day which
"upsets the school program."
The elementary school princi-
pals objected to the chorus on
four grounds in a joint statement
presented to the board:
1) "Although the values of par-
ticipating in the Youth Chorus
are great for the children in-
volved, the educational cost in
other elements of their school
program also is very great."
Population Increase
2) As school population in-
creases, a smaller percentage of
children are able to participate in
the Chorus.
3) Preparations for the per-
formance affect school life "and
bring undesirable consequences
for children in schools who are
not in the Youth Chorus."
4) In recent years the number
of schools in the city has in-
creased, making transportation to
rehearsals more difficult and time
consuming.
Instruction Noted
The principals noted, however,
that the students in the chorus
received special musical instruc-
tion. School "Superintendent Jack
Elzay suggested that the Musical
Society independently develop a
youth chorus.
Prof. Hood, who has directed
the group since 1943, said that
the chorus has contained "just
under 400 children" in recent
years.
Gail W. Rector, director of the
M u a I c a 1 Society, termed the
Chorus' last performance in the
May Festival "a success."
Sink, Rector and Prof.' Hood
have been invited to a school
board meeting to discuss the prob-
lem. No date for the meeting has
been set yet, according to the Mu-
sical Society office.
~1

Upsets
GREENWICH, Conn, (W) -
More than 80 children were
tossed into Long Island Sound
yesterady by a sudden squall
that disrupted a sailing race
and overturned nearly 40 boats.
All were saved. A regatta offi-
cial said a majority of the 113
boats that took part had al-
ready finished when the squall
hit,
Meanwhile, in Charles
City, Iowa, stealing bases has
landed a six-year-old boy into
a mess of trouble. Police said
the youngster went to a Little
League field . , . put first, sec-
and and third base in his
wagon . . . and carted them
home.
S tree Recital
To Be Given
In Rackhan
Pianist Robert Larsen, Grad.,
will present a recital at 8:30 p.m.
today in Rackham Assembly Hall.
The recital, being given in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Master of Music degree, is
open to the general public.
The program will include sonatas
by Mozart, Beethoven and Dello
Voio. "Valses Nobles et Senti-
mental es" by Ravel will also be
featured in the recital.
Discussion Set
For Slosscon
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department will discuss the
current French political situation
at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 3050, Frieze
Bldg.
The discussion, sponsored by the
Cercie Francais. is open to thi
public, according to Jean Cardun-
er, of the romance languages de-
partment, advisor to the club,
Organization
Notices
University Christian Federation, open
house, to meet Rev. Mr. Celestine Fer-
yando, Unversity of Ceylon,.Thurs.,
July 10, 4-6 p.m., Lane .Hall.

DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I
<:

S,.-.....-.....,.,,,...,,,,.~.

(Continued from Page 2)
University Community Square DanCes
ponsored by the Departments of Phys.
duc. and Summer Session. Callers are
I1 members of the Ann Arbor Square
ance Leaders Assoc. Thurs., July 10,
:00-10:00 p.m., Palmer Field.
Lectures
Linquistlcs Forum Lecture: Prof. Wil-
am M. Austin, Georgetown Univ. on
English Syntax and Machine Transla-
ion." Thurs., July 10, 7:30 p.m., Rack-
am Amphitheatre.
Public Lecture Foreign Language Pro-
ram: "TV~-A New Dimension in Lan-
uage Teaching," by Professor Gordon
arrell, Univ. of Detroit, The lecture
ill /be given in the Romance Languages
ounge, 3050 Frieze, 4:10 p.m. Thurs.,
uly 10.
Concerts
Student Recital: Robert Larsen, piano
tudent of Joseph Brinkman, will pre-
ent a recital in partial fulfillment of
he requirements for the degree of
aster of Music in Rackham Assembly
[all, Thurs., July 10, 8:30 p.m. Mr.1
arsen will include sonatas by Mozart,
;eethoven and Dello Joio in his pro-
ram, in addition to Ravel's "Valses
obles et Sentimentales." Open to the
eneral public.
Plays
Th4 Dept. of Speech presents "In-
.erit the Wind" by Jerome Lawrence
nd Robert E. Lee Tonight and Tomor-
o at 8:00 p.m. in the Lydia Men-
elssohn Theatre. The second in. the
958 summer Playbill "Inherit the!
7Vind" is based on the famous "Mofikey
'rial" of 1925 and features the colossal
attie between Clarence Darrow and

William Jennings Brya. All seats are
reserved at $1.50, $1110 and 75c. The
Lydia Mendelssohni Theatre is in the
north end of the Michigan League Bldg.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies with the Bureau
of Appointments for the 19583 - 1959
school year. They will not be here to
interview at this time,
Edwards, Calif,-HS Mentally Retard-
ed (must be certified in arts & crafts);
English; Social Studies (MA req.),
Fraser, Mich.-Elementary; Vocal Mu-
sic.
Jackson, Mich. - Soc. St.; English;
Speech/English; Elementary Math.
Plainfield, N.J.-Early Elem; 5th grade
(slow); 7/8th Math; Elem. Remedial
Read; 6-8th Home Econ.; 7/8th Eng/
Soc. St.; HS Gen. Biol/Gen. Sci.; Girls'
PE; English.
Plymouth, Mich.-Home Econ. JHS
Math/G eneral Science.
Portland, Ore. -- Director of Child
Services. -
Port Jefferson, L.T,, N.Y.-Physics.
Reading, Mich.-Vocal Music; Social
Studies; English (Junior High).
South Fallsburg, N.Y.-Fifth grade.
Three Oaks, Mich.-English/Part-time
librarian.
. Three Rivers, Mich.-Speech Correc-
tion.

Urbana, Ill.-Psychologist; Reading
Consultant; Social Worker; Elementary;
Elem. Art Supervisor; 4th grade Con-
versational French; JHS Girls' Coun-
selor; HS Speech/Dramatics; Music-
Elementary Supervisor; Secondary In-
strumental.
Waterloo, Iowa-HS Spanish; English/
Speech; JHS, Industrial Arts; Math/
General Science; Vocal Music; Special
Edurcation.:
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin, Bldg., NOrmandy 3-1511x Ext.
f 489.

Trainee, Minimum requirement is col-
lege graduation, preferably with major
in psychology or related fields.
Ordnance Ammunition Comman d,
U.S. Army, Joliet, Ill., are looking for
Civilian personnel to fill the following
vacancies: General Administration,
Electrical and Mechanical Engineers,
Illustrator, Analytical Statistician, and
Publications Writer.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
Part time work for a man with jour-
nalism courses to assist in an agency
in Ann Arbor,
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Building, Ext. 3371.
j ~ ~ ~2 Z T Z

PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Muroc Unified Schools, Edwards,
Calif., have an opening for a High
School Principal. Must have 2 to 3 years
exp. as principal. Age 30-48. Masters'I
degree in administration. Call Bureau
of Appointments, Ext, 3061, for inter-
view appointment and salary informa-
tion.
The Good Shepherd Mission, Fort De-
fiance, Ariz., have an opening for a
Housemother. Will be responsible for
about ten Navajo girls, aged 12 to 15,
and supervise clothing and religious in-
struction. Must have some exp, with
this age group.
Michigan Employment Security Com-
mission is currently accepting applica-
tions for positions as Personnel Methods

The, GOLDEN APPLES
Hestaurrant...
features for your enjoyment
CHICKEN. STEAKe SEAFOOD
SMORGASBORD
also BUFFET LUNCHEONS 11 A.M.-2 P.M.
ALL YOU CAN EAT for $1.00
OWER OtTEL
NO 2_4531 300 South Thoyer

HEY SHPRINSKY!

Hillel's having
A PH'NIC'
THIS SUNDAY-PORTAGE LAKE
FREE TRANSPORTATION

l

VISIT OUR
BARGAIN BASEMENT
316 South State

11

11

II

__ _; ___

I

I

Call: B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation NO 3-4129

11

i t e; s se . s2 ° Gc ar;

Y' T._T T 7 T VW V TV T T T T Y TV TV Y T$ Y V TV Y TV T T TV I

T

. .

1 ,
'' ' e.\

J!

or th

rl e,.,

Let us assist you with your plans
for that all important wedding day.

COME IN AND SEE OUR C
jZ \\1 SELECTION OF CRANE'S
* INVITATIO
* STATIONE
0 ANNOUNC
INFORMAL
0 ACCESSORI

OMPLETE
XNS
RY
'EMENTS
S

ES

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan