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June 27, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-06-27

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THE MICnIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

TJJFA MICHIGAN hAhN FR WAX,

aiisl Claims in Africa Threatened

URBAN RENEWAL PLANNED:
Ann Arbor Considering Rehabilitation of 75 Acres

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Writer
Spain, scenting for the first time
he prospect of profit from its
Vest African colonies, suddenly
as found its whole foothold there
1 danger.
Morocco, flexing the muscles of
ew independence, has laid claim
o allof Spanish West Africa.
This strip of coastline on the
:ge of the great Sahara Desert
as annexed by Spain in the late
800s. Never profitable, the colon-
s were held for reasons of na-
tonal prestige.
Iron Ore Discovered
Recently, however, rich iron ore
eposits have been discovered in
he French Sahara. Spanish West
frica lies between the deposits
nd the sea, on the shipping route.
But the Moroccan government
f King Mohammed V, in the
ame of "liberation of greater
[orocco," has claimed 600,000
quare miles of new territory. This
ncludes not only Spanish West
Africa, but also portions of French
erritory containing the iron ore.
The Spanish and French aren't
kely to surrender these territor-
e willingly.
United States Has Interests
And if the stalemate blazes in-
o war, it could singe the tail-
eathers of a highly interested by-
tander-the United States.
Under an agreement made with
he French when Morocco was still
. French coldny, the United States
pent millions to carve Strategic
kir Command bases out of the
ocky Moroccan terrain. For
nonths now, it has been negotiat-
ng with King Mohammed's gov-
rnment for agreements permit-
ing it to keep them.
These negotiations could break
[louse Passes
Boating Law
WASHINGTON (P)-The House
Merchant Marine Committee yes-
erday approved a bill providing
or the registration of small boats,
xcept those powered by motors
f 7% horsepower or less.
The boats would be registered
vith state agencies or with the
!oast Guard.
The bill, designed as a safety
neasure, calls upon states to
dopt uniform safety codes for
he operation of motorboats. A
imilar measure was returned to
he merchant marine committee
Vednesday bytheHouse because
)f technical objections.

Je Me t v~~'Tana'er e iTeFtuan::a :-
Sidi Unrsik de Mesti " ---
At alaten o Former Northern Protectorate
-..- -- .. -- fe
Zoco el Telata Oujda
TuguCfet casabRlanca Rbt
Asaka o
El Arosi Ug-gu
Sidi Innu Sari
Ksaresouk Figvrg
OMorruech
MogadorMOROCO
..... .......... ..........A..i.To. e
- o0 U.s. AIRSAsEASE
.ern. ProtectorateNAVA
o panish Sahara
..... S id i rllI --
I . n AL E R iA
..r. f.
. Spaihmara
SPANISH
sir Nzaran WEST A F R ICA
- Rio De Ciro N
FRENCH WEST AtFRICA
AP Newsfeatures

Urban renewal, otherwise known
as slum clearance. is, in essence, a
carefully worked out - but still
incomplete-scheme for the re-;
habilitation or redevelopment ofj
blighted areas of the city.
Applied to Ann Arbor. urban re-
newal would involve approximately
'75 acres in the north central sec-
tion of the city. Where economi-
cally feasible, parts of the area
would be simply rehabilitated or
given a facelifting. Badly rundown
sections would be cleared and re-
developed.
The ultimate goal is not only,
the clearing away of the products
of years of decay. but also to
remedy the conditions which have
contributed to the decay,
Building Removal
The means to this end, though
not yet planned in detail, include
removal of decrepit buildings and
Detroit Fam
Reaches Peai

replacement with adequate, safe Upon federal approval, the gov-
housing; relief of overcrowding, ernment would take over respon-
fewer buildings and more open sibility for two-third of the cost
space, planted with trees and
grass: improvement of roadways; -presently estimated at slightl
addition of more and better park- less than $2,200,000-leaving the
ing facilities: and provision of ade- city to bear the remaining one-
quate recreational space and facil- third and handle actual adminis-
ities. tration of the project.
The problems involved in such Preliminary steps toward an ur-
an ambitious project are many and ban renewal project were taken in
complex. Plans must be worked out 1954 and federal agencies first con-
in great detail and to the satis- tacted in April, 1955. Since then,
faction of the city as a whole, the the local project has slowly, but
local government, and the indi- not smoothly, progressed into the
viduals most directly affected - second of two lengthy formal plan-
residents of the area involved. ning stages.
Population of the affected zone, Present plans, to take five years,
which includes 507 residential call for: destruction of about 60
units, is estimated between 1,700 buildings in the area; construction
and 1,800 persons, many of whom of a number of multiple housing
would be displaced and have to be units; zoning modifications de-
satisfactorily relocated, signed to protect residential areas
from industrial activities on the
north side and commercial activi-l
ily more adequateIeandconveniently
located park site; provision of
2 0 .d.' 1 W -

more offstreet parking to serve the
commercial zone and act as a buf-
fer between it and the adjoining
residential areas; and finally, re-
working of traffic flow patterns in
the area to ease the congestion on
local streets now used as thorough-
fares.
Plan Opposed
A preliminary plan for the pro-
ject encountered considerable op-
position from residents of the area
\ ho particularly objected to relo-
cation and street closing. A second
tentative plans on land use and
physical changes is presently near-
ing completion and is scheduled
to be presented at a special City
Council meeting July 15.
The city now hopes to have a
final project report for federal in-
spection by mid-October. The com-
pleted report must include all as-
pects of urban renewal plans, in-
cluding a relocation plan and pro-
posed means of fulfilling the city's
financial responsibility in the pro-
ject.

r in 1y571

down if the Moroccans order all
foreign troops out of their coun-
try. They have already told the
Spanish to get out.
Spanish Clash with Guerillas
Trouble already has flared at
Ifni and in Spain's Southern Pro-
tpctorate, where the Spanish have
clashed with guerillas of the self-,
styled "Army of the Liberation of
the Moroccan Sahara."
Ifni is a 15 by 35 mile bite of
Morocco's southwest coastline
which the Spanish have held since
1860. It isn't much-an arid land
split by gullies where crops will
grow only with generous applica-
tions of irrigation and persua-
sion. But it carries on a brisk trade
with the interior and the Spanish
have warned they will defend it.
The Southern Protectorate is a
12,693-square-mile wedge of desert

on

Morocco's

which was allote
King Mohammec
the throne, Crov
Hassan, has call
door on the Sah
Attack If
Last Novembe
attacked the Sp
Ifni. The fightin
Moroccan border
ern Protectorate
hara. Early this
nounced it had
of the area.
Little of Moro
tion has been p
violence were pr
dence, grantedI
March 1956
One month la
over the Northe
narrow corridor
across the Me
Gibralta c.

southern border On April 1, foreign ministers
d to Spain in 1912. Fernando Maria Castiella of Spain
d's son and heir to and Ahmed FalafreJ of Morocco
wn Prince Moulay agreed that Mcrocco would as-
led this area "our sum<e control of the Scuthern Pro-
ara." tectcrate April 10. But the trans-
ni Garrison fer never took place.
r 1,200 irregulars Spain said it thought the trans-
anish garrison at fer, could be accomplisbed quietly
ig spilled over the with a few Morcccarn officials
r into the South- showing up at Villa Bens. When
and Spanish Sa- a large column of Moroccan troops
s year Spain an- appeared on the road to Villa
regained control Bens, trouble developed,
The road dips into Spanish ter-
coo's rise as a na- ritory. The Spanish wouldn't let
eaceful. Riots and the troops pass. Two days later,
ologue to indepen- the Rabat government ordered
by the French in Spain to get its 30,000 troops out
of Morocco.
tc.r, Spain turned If the government decides to
rn Protectorate, a expand its order to all foreign
of coastal land troops, it would affect 45,000
diterranean from French soldiers and possibly 12,-
000 United States servicemen.

Family income reached an all-
time high in Detroit during 1957,
according to the Detroit Area
Study conducted by the Univer-.
sity's sociology department and
Institute for Social Research.
In the study's, annual analysis
of family income in Wayne, Ma-
comb and Oakland counties, it
found that there were signs that
the auto industry recessionwas
having its greatest impact on those
families least able to afford it.
Study Director Harry Sharp re-
ports that typical family income in
metropolitan Detroit reached~
$6,200 last year, which was up
$200 from 1956.
Includes Relatives
Included in this figure is money'
from all sources received by those
persons related by blood or mar-
riage and are living togpther In
one household.
Half the Detroit area families
had incomes greater than the
$6,200 figure, while half had less.
Those families whose main wage
earner was unempioyed during the
months of February and March of
this year had typical incomes
$2,500 less than those still em-
ployed, Sharp said.
The Study found that during the
past seven years, median family
income in the Detroit area rose 35
per cent, about four times as fast
as living costs.
Families Rise More
The income of husband-wife
family units rose faster than those

of single, widowed or divorced
breadwinners it was found. Also,
the white family income rose at a
rate somewhat greater than that
of the Negro.
Further, when only employed
family breadwinners are consid-
ered, there is no evidence that any
occupational group received great-
er increases in purchasing power
than others. However, the family
income of blue collar craftsmen
and foremen remained "substan-
tially above" that of white-col-
lared clerical and sales people,
The most dramatic shifts in in-
come changes in the 1951-57 in-
terval were found to have occurred
in the upper income brackets. Al-
most three times as many Detroit
area households had incomes over
$10,000 in 1957 as in 1951.
Four out of 10 families had in-
comes of $7,000 or more last year,
a figure twice the 1951 proportion.
Little Decrease
Conversely, at the other end of
the income scale there was rela-
tively little change in the propor-
tion of families with incomes below
$3,000. This group fell from only'
16 to 12 per cent as determined by
the families studied.
"While some low income families
moved into middle income brackets
and were replaced by low income
migrants to Detroit, this movement
is probably not as great as that of
middle income families into upper
levels and already high income
families moving even higher, Sharp
noted.
Substantial differences In in-
come were found among families
with different educational levels.
College-educated family earners
typically had an income $3,400
greater than those who had only
six years of formal education.
Negroes Earn Less
The median income of white
families in the Detroit area in 1951
was 137 per cent higher than that
of Negroes. This figure jumped to
150 per cent in 1957, showing that
white families in general had in-
comes half again as high as
Negroes.
The study showed an increase in
the relative differences in income
levels of residents of the city of,
Detroit and those in suburban
areas.
- -

OPEN EVENINGS
MGM
SOUNDTRACK RECORDINGS
40% /oOFF]
reg ,$4.98 now only $2.98
KISS ME KATE
KISMET
SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS
DEEP IN MY HEART
SHOWBOAT
ROSEMARI E
THE MERRY WIDOW
SUMMERSTOCK
INTERRUPTED MELODY
AMERICAN IN PARIS
THE WIZARD OF OZ
BANDWAGON
THE DSHOP
1210 South University Phone NO 3-6922
OPEN EVENING

At the DISC SHOP

" 0 *

FIRST PRIZE WINNER'
InternationaE Tchaikovsky Competition

DETROIT SURVEY SHOWS:
Recession Hurts Semi-Skilled Most
Semi-skilled machine operators,
service workers and laborers are The report shows that among In a poll whic included only fac-
being hit hardest by the business these blue collar groups, seniority tory workers, the employed were
recession in metropolitan Detroit, is generally determining who does found to be twice as likely to own
according to the Detroit Area and does not continue work. The their own homes as the unem-
Study conducted by the Univer- typical age of unemployed blue p
sity's Institute for Social Research collar adults, judged by the survey ployed. Further, the employed fac-
and the sociology department. to be 36, is 10 years younger than tory workers had 1957 family in-
that of comparable Detroiters who comes generally $1,600 higher than
MTsare still employed. the unemployed.
T~i'a loaVAt the time of the survey two- There was little indication that
ASS af thirds of all those unemployed in membership or non-membership in
"Athe area were blue collar workers. a labor union was related to unem-
W ins Aw ard In comparison to factory workers ployment among the blue collar
still employed, they were more workers,
The first annual Bendetson Net- likely to be younger, southern born,
zorg Memorial Piano Contest has Negro, city resident as opposed
been won by Karen Louise Taylor, to suburbia, rent rather than own
The contest was sponsored by tially lower family incomes on the
the Bohemians, a Detroit profes- bacoditheir 1957 intake Director DIAL NO 2-3136
sional music club, in memory of Harry Sharp, these differences:can Ends Saturday
its co-founder and past president, be associated with the lower job
Bendetson Netzorg. Purpose of the seniority of these population Gettin
contest is to offer encouragement gos
to talented young pianists,. groups.shd
Miss Taylor, who won out This, is the same study group MURDER r
-over which collected information on
five other finalists, was selected as unemployed and employed persons Getting
the winner by a panel of three from a random sampling of about out Was
musicians. 700 families in Wayne, Macomb
Besides a cash prize, the award and Oakland counties in February
consists of a chance to appear as and March of this year.
soloist with the Detroit Symphony In that study it was determinedW.
Orchestra when it presents a con- that unemployment was a problem WARNER8R3.,
cert July 22 at the Michigan State for one in 33 white collar workers, PRESETS
Fairgrounds. Miss Taylor will play one in 10 skilled workers or fore- C
Beethoven's "Piano Concerto No. men and one in five semi-skilled, 1 YEN
2." unskilled or service workers. R'

f
r
f
pS
L

Learn to dance
the new steps

...NOW
SUMMER RATES
NOW IN EFFECT

I

1 x5l

DILNO 8-6416
TODAY and SATURDAY
Winner of Two
International
Academy Awards
ALEC GUINNESS
at his macabre best!
'tALE LadykiGers
and also
ALEC GUINNESS

Bring this ad in with
you to receive $25.00
OFF toward a dance
Course.

i1

I

Hear

Van Cliburn's
** First Recording
On

11

ARTHUR MURRAY

r

DANCE
this Saturday, June 28
Blaser-Johnson Orchestra
League Ballroom
9-12 stag or drag $1.00

ViVRILI
A SWEEPING NEW: ROLE
-IS FIRST THUNDERING
MOTION PICTURE!I
JOat.

in
"TO PARIS WITH LOVE"
Week Days From 7 P.M.
& Sun. Continuous from 1 P.M.

DANCE STUDIO
1311 South University

Ann Arbor

NO 2-5539

I

me

11

I

" .
*
.,"

M

RCA Victor

I

Folk Song Enthusiasts! Participate in
Vivienne Stenson's two day session of
* Josh White AND
* Henry "RRed"f JAZZ
Allen poetry reading... ...forum

-i

II

Records

'k

Y
t {

l'
5""J'.... i

ENDING
TODAY
The Sprightly

DIAL 2-2513

Continuous
From 1 P.M.

Langston at the Canadian
Hughe91958 STRATFORD MUSIC FESTIVAL
* MarshallW. JULY 2 -24
Stearns Food, accommodation, three
and many concerts, etc., all for $25.

I

IPFEIV7(i'

.No

.. .

- x 7W lV!-Jz~ Atk, 'I 1

... ... . .. J

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