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August 02, 1958 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, A

.......

V ATTEMPT TO PREVENT COLLISIONS:
Airlines Operate on 'Superhighways of the Air'

By TOM HENSHAW
ssociated Press Newsfeatures Writer
It may not be detectable from
e ground but for the past month
ajor coast-to-coast airline flights
ave been operating on what may
called "superhighways of the
The aerial turnpikes are mile-
gh, 40-mile-wide corridors laid
it by the Civil Aeronautics Ad-
inistratilon in an effort to pre-
nt deadly air collisions that
we plagued airlines for the past
.cade.
During that time there have
'en 167 air collisions in which
.1 persons have died. Last year
one, the Civil Aeronautics Board
ok notice of 971 near misses.
The air corridors went into use
st June 16, nearly a month after
Capital Airlines plane and a
ilitary jet collided over Bruns-
ick, Md., with a death toll of

......o...............k R iver....................-
......................
44 !
LAJet-Airliner n -
April 21, 1958 -. --..... --.4
"-..eDead: 49 ewYork
7+aRock River ---r-....*.. Granditsbrg
.. Island II -------
1:! 01
''.31 195shinghiin D.C.,m
San Francisw ,/:! Denver
.a e a s - - K a n s a s C ity $ L i s- J -A r n r
r ! " ---. ---...rto ..,..+.s...a w~t ~r .-- -- --- -- ---. l... ~ wt.+ May 2 1958
,. : ~~~Farmington --* ee4+ :::
Los Angeles T wo Airliners ...
' Dead: 128 -----
iij~iij..................
..... .... ... ..
Jet irli er .........

Israel Basis
Of Turmoil
--Houss ni
The base of the present turmoil
in the Middle East has been theI
creation of the State of Israel,
Mussa Houssani of Lebanon, de-I
clared Thursday in a University
radio program.
Houssani, faculty member of the
American University of Beirut, re-
cently completed his requirements
for a Ph.D. degree in business ad-
ministration from the University.
Another View
Joining Houssani for the
WUOM-FM "Background" broad-
cast was Hollis Peter, director of
the foreign aid program in Leb-
anon from 1951 to 1953. Peter is
currently with the Foundation for
Research on Human Behavior.
Peter's view of the problem is
"how we can work as friends with
the Arab States in their legitimate
economic, social and political pro-
grams while at the same time
maintaining Israel as a separate
state and preventing Com munist
expansion in the vital Middle
East."
Aid, Politics Inseparable
Peter said that any economic aid
program cannot be dissociated
with political developments. He
emphasized that there is a dis-
crepancy in United States aid
given to Israel. From 1945 to 1957,
United States aid to Israel alone
was more than three times the
combined amount given to all of
the Arab countries, even though
the Arab population was 25 times
as large as Israel's.

TO INCLUDE BACH, HAYDN:
Prof. Mason To Present
Organ Concert Monday

I.

Prof. Marilyn Mason of the
music school will present an organ
concert, featuring works by Wal-
ther, Haydn, Bach, Alain, Langlais,

The concert will conclude with
Paul Creston's Suite for Organ,
written in 1957 by commission of
Prof. Mason and dedicated to her.
Its premiere was played in Novem-
ber, 1957 in Ann Arbor by Prof.
Mason.
Local Art Loft
Plans Exhibit
The Art Loft of Ann Arbor will
hold its first exhibition of paint-
ings and sculptures from Monday
to Aug. 9 at the rear of 337 May-
nard above The Potter's Guild.
The group was recently organ-
ized on a non-profit basis to pro-
vide work and exhibition space for
its members, according to Mrs. A.
R. Krachenberg of the Art Loft.
The Loft will be open from 2 to
5 p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m. Monday
through Friday and on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Organization
Notices
August 3: Graduate Outing Club,
swimming, hiking, meet N.W. entrance,
back of Rackham, 2 p.m.
, * * *
August 3V Congregational and Dis.-
cpies Guild, picnic, program, 542
Thompson, 5 p.m.

.

£

Commercial Crashes
The Maryland crash was the
>urth in two years involving com-
ercial airliners. There have been
t least 11 others involving only
ilitary aircraft.
The first was the collision be-
veen two commercial planes over
ne Grand Canyon in Arizona in
hich 128 persons died. It was one
' the worst disasters in aviation

I

, Seven were killed in an airliner-
military jet collision over the San
Fernando Valley in California in
January, 1957, and 49 died in an
April 21, 1958, airliner-jet mishap
over the Nevada Desert.
The air corridors, designed to

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continuedx from Page 2)
eye" Mon., Aug. 4, 4:15 p.m., Rackham
mphitheatre.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Professor
eorge L. Trager, Univ. of Buffalo, on
So me Methodological Considerations in
he Reconstruction of Indo-Hittite Pho-
ology." Tues., Aug. 5, 7:30 p.m., Rack-
am Amphitheatre.
Concerts
Student Recital: Jana Woodrum,
Lano student of Benning Dexter, will
resent a recital in partial fulfillment
f the requirements for the degree of
achelor of Music on Sat., Aug. 2, 8:30
.m. Her recital which will be held in
ud. A, Angell Hall, will include an
nglish Suite by Bach, Sonatas by
chubert and Berg, and compositions
sy Debussy and Schumann. pen to
lie general public without charge.
Collegium Musicum, which wag an-
ounced for Sun.. Aug. 3 has been can-
elled.,
The University Summer Session Choir
ill be presented in a concert at Hill
cud. on Sun., Aug. 3, 8:30 p.m. The
hoir, under the direction of Robert
ountain, will perform groups of mad-
gals, motets, and romantic and con-
miporary works. Charles Schaefer will
e at the organ console, and soloists for
[oart's "Missa Brevis in F Major" will
e Janet Ast, soprano Mimi Brndt,
oprano, Dan Pressley, tenor and Wil-
s Patterson, bass. Open to the general
iblic without charge.
Faculty Recital: Marilyn Mason
rown will present an organ recital in
111 Aud. in conjunction with the Uni-
ersity Summer Session program "Re-
ggion in Contemporary Society." Her
cital, to be held on Mon., Aug. 4 8:30
. will include "The Musical Clocks"
y Haydn; "Concerto del Signor Torel-
"' by Wather; Bach's "Prelude and
ugue in D Major; "Deux Danses" by
ehan Alain; a composition by Jean
anuglais, and a Suite for organ, cor-
ised by Paul Creston, which was com-
tissioned by Miss Mason and dedicated
> her. Open to the general public.
Faculty Recital Cancel: The piano re-
itl by Robert Hord df the School of
usiicpreviously scheduled for Tues.,
ug. 5, in Rackham Lecture Hall, has
en cancelled.
d4cademic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
^arm Mayer, Chemistry; thesis: ""Re-
rangement of Aliphatic Pinacols and
etones: A Mechanism Study," Sat.,
ug. 2, 3003 Chem. Bldg., 10:00 a.m.
hairman, R. M. Stiles.
Doctoral Examination for Sidney Ir-
in Perloe, Social Psychology; thesis:
An 'xperimental Test of Two Theories
Perceptual Defense," Mon., Aug. 4,
11 Haven Hall, 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
, S. Blum.
Doctoral Examination for Keki Hor-
tusji Gharda, Chemical Engineering;
esis: "Stability and Activity of Cop-
3r Catalysts in the Hydrogenation of.
itrobenzene to Aniline," Mon., Aug.
3201 E. Engrg. Bldg., 2:00 p.m. Chair-
an, C. M. Sliepcevich.
Doctoral Examination for Patrick
mes Conklin, Political Science; the-
s: "A Hard Look at the "Training
round Thesis: A Study of Countyand
ownship Experience in the Back-
ounds of Legislators Selected Execu-
ye officers, and Supreme Court us-
ce in Five States,' Mon., Aug. 4, 4609
aven Hall, 10:00 a.m. Chairman, D. S.
cHargue.
Doctoral Examination for Constance
Irginia Mynatt, Education; thesis: "A
udy of the Differences in Selected
lysical Performance Test Scores of
omen in Tennessee Colleges." Mon.,
ug. 4, 117 PEM Bldg., at 8:30 a.m.
aairman, P. A. Hunsicker.
Doctoral Examination for Edwin Lowe
eville, Jr., History; thesis: "The De-
lopment of Transportation in Japan:
Case Study of Okayama Han, 1600-
68," Mon., Aug. 4, 3609 Haven Hall,
:00 a.m. Chairman, J. W. Hal.
Doctoral Examination for Edith Bor-
ff, Musicology; thesis: "The Instru-
ental Works of Jean-Joseph Cassanea
aMondonville," Tues., Aug. 5 West
ouncil R., Rackham Bldg., at 4:00
m. Chairman. L. E. Cuyler.
Doctoral Examination for David B.
hisholm Bacteriolgy; thesis: Changes
. the Non-Specific Antimicrobial Ac-
rity of Serum Associated with Pneu-
ucoccus Septicemia, Tues., Aug. 5,
66 E. Med. Bldg., at 3:00 pm. Chair-
an, W. J. Nurgester.
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
urtwright Greening, Psychology thesis:
foral Standards and Defenses Agains
;gression," Tues., Aug. 5, 7611 Haven
ll, 4:00 p.m., Chairman, D. R. Miller.
Doctoral Examination for Ku-Liang
m, Civil Engineering; thesis: "Slab-
nd Floor Construction" Tues., Aug.
305 W Eng. Bldg. 2:00 p.m. Chairman

Yohe, Economics; thesis: "The Wick-
sellian Tradition in Swedish Macro-
economic Theory," Tues., Aug. 5, 105
Econ. Bldg. at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, K.
E. Boulding.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies with the Bureau of
Appointments for the 1958-59 school
year. They will not be here to inter-
view at this time,
Albion, Mich. 3rd grade; 6th grade...
Alien Park, Mich. - Mentally handi-
capped (JHS).
Bay City, Mich. - Teacher Consult-
ant, Type C (for the handicapped).
Boyne City, Mich. - Early and late
elementary; Girls Physical Education.
Harvey, 111. - Early elementary; JHS
Girls Plhysical Education (includes su-
pervising student teachers); Elem.
Speech Correction.
Highland Park, Mich. -- Early and
late elementary; Girls Physical Edu-
cation; Home Economics; Orthopedic
(all elem. levels).
Mt. Clemens, Mich. -- HS Math.
Jackson, Mich. - JHS Math; Art; Up-
per elementary.
Muskegon Heights, Mich. - JHS Home
Economics.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Ad. Bldg., NOrmandy 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Personnel Requests:
A Management Consultant Firm in
Greenwich, Conn., is looking for a man
to fill a vacancy as Supervisor of Resin
Research and Assistant to the Direc-
tor in a large, profitable company. Job
is in 14assachusetts. Job responsibility
iso conduct product research activity
to develop new and improved resin fin-
ished fabrics and to assist the Director
of Woven Products Research as re-
quired. Must be able to work with sales
and promotion people, as well as re-
searchers. Age: 30-40. Education; PhD
in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering
preferred. Lack of advanced degree
must be offset by superior experience.
Technical. Should be well grounded in
research techniques, and have some ex-
perience in product development. Ex-
perience: Several years in product de-
velopment and research plus supervi-
sory responsibility. Familiarity with
resins desirable.
Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., Roches-
ter, N.Y., has openings for the follow-
ing personnel: 1) A Physicist - M.S. or
Ph.D. desired. Experience in Spectro-
scopy and Electronics helpful. 2) Two
Mathematical Physicists-M.S. or Ph.D.
In Physics. Familiarity with Solid State
Physics desirable. An Experimental
Physicist - M.S. or Ph.D. 4) A Mathe-
matician - B.S. in Physics or Math.
5) An Optical Engineer - B.S. 6) An
Optical Engineer-- B.S. in Physics or
other related sciences. 7) An Electrical
Engineer, major in electronics. (;
Gateway Transportation Co., La-
Crosse, Wisc. is looking for men to en-
ter their Executive Training Program.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute,
Woods Hole, Mass., has openings for
Computors and Mathematicians.
Union Carbide Chemicals Company,
S. Charleston, W. Va., is looking for
Research, Development, Design & Con-
struction, Production, and Technical
Sales Engineers.
The Peoples Gas, Light and Coke
Company, Chicago, Ill. has openings for
Accountants, and Mechanical and Elec-
trical Engineers.
Niagara Machine & Tool Works, Buf-
falo, N.Y., has positions available for
Sales, Service and Design Engineers.
E. F. Houghton & Co., Philadelphia,
Pa., has openings for Sales and Service
Engineers.
Kemper Insurance, Chicago, Ill. has
openings for Underwriters, Claim Ad-
justers, Statisticians, and Safety Engi-
neers.
Farnsworth Electronics Company,
Fort Wayne, Ind. has openings for
graduates with degrees in Journalism,
Business Administration, Accounting,
Physics, Mathematics, Engineering.
Bowers Printing Ink Co., Chicago, Ill..
has openings for Printing Ink Color
Matcher, Printing Ink Formulators,
Printing Ink Chemists.
For further information on job va-
cancies, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.
I I

prevent this carnage, link NewY
York and Washington with San
Francisco and Los Angeles through
the major way stops. They are for
air traffic going in both directions.
Controls Entrance
Tne CAA controls entrance into
the corridors and spaces the planes
so that they are at least 10 min-
utes flying time apart horizontally
and 1,000 feet vertically. Their
altitudes are from 17,000 to 22,000
feet.
Military planes also observe the
rules of the air corridors although
the CAA does not exercise absolute
control over their flights.
Right now Congress is consider-
ing a bill that would set up a
federal aviation agency that would
have full authority over the air
space used by both civilian and
military planes.
The agency would take over the
functions of the CAA and the Air-
ways Modernization Board and the
air safety regulating operations
of the CAB.
The air corridors are only a
temporary measure designed to
hold the line against air collisions
until something better can be de-
vised for use in the approaching
jet age of 600 m.p.h. air speeds.
'Hu man is m'
To Be Topic
Of .Discussion
"Humanism as a Creative Force"
will be discussed by Prof. Gardner
Williams,' chairman of the Univer-
sity of Toledo philosophy depart-
ment, at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Unitarian Church, 1917 Wash-
tenaw.
Prof. Williams' lecture will be
the sixth and last in a summer
series on "Creative Forces in So-
ciety."
Prof. Williams, author of "Hu-
manistic Ethics" (1951) and a fre-
quent contributor to philosophical
and religious journals, received his
Ph.D. degree from the University
in 1929.

RELIGIOUS, SECULAR CONFLICT:
rofessor Explains Why
Hamlet Procrastinated

(I'

In Hamlet, Shakespeare showed
how the conflict between God and'
the world could tear a man apart,
Richard Kroner, Temple Univer-
sity philosophy professor, declared
Thursday.
Hamlet's conflict was not one
between reason and passion but
between religious and secular de-
mands, he added.
Prof. Kroner, also a professor
emeritus at Union Theological
Seminary and Kiel University,
Germany, gave his views on why
Hamlet procrastinated in a speech
sionsored by the philosophy de-;
partment.
Ignoble or Not?
The question, "To"be or not to
be," is a question of whether Ham-
let should be ignoble or not, Prof.
Kroner continued. "Hamlet's rea-
son for procrastinating was due to
a split in the demands of his con-
science. He had to decide between
the secular demand of promoting.
the recognition of his father's kill-
er and the religious demand of notI
taking revenge.
"If Shakespeare had wanted us
to accept the religious demand,
there would be no drama or tragic
destiny. It is especially tragic be-
cause Hamlet is a deeply religious
man."
Calls Hamlet Tragic
Prof. Kroner pointed to Hamlet's
asking his mother to repent and.
his refraining from suicide as in-
dications of his religious nature.
"Shakespeare makes it clear
that Hamlet is perfectly normal
and not pathological," Prof.
Kroner noted. "Therefore, this
makes Hamlet tragic."
"Hamlet is somewhat of a phil-
osopher - he speculates like a'
Renaissance philosopher. But
there is a balance between his con-;

templative mind and the energy of
his wit."
Goethe once said that Hamlet
was without the robust strength
that makes a hero, Prof. Kroner
noted, but the end of the play
proves that Hamlet did not lack
strength of mind.
Restrained by 'Deeper Conscience'
Hamlet's uncertainty as to the
true nature of his father's death
was not the whole cause of his
worry and delay, Prof. Kroner said.
The question of taking "bloody
revenge" is the "deeper con-
science" that restrains his actions.
Prof. Kroner agreed with Goethe
that there was an inner fight in
Hamlet, but he sees the conflict
as not one of good against evil, but
the conflict between two moral
orders.
Plan Sessions
On Schools
The 1958 Summer Workshop in
Human Relations in School and
Community will be held at the
University August 4-15.
The workshop is offered by the
education school in cooperation
with the Commission on Educa-
tional Organizations and the Na-
tional Conference of Christians
and Jews.
It provides a two-week period of
intensive work in human relations,
in planning instructional develop-
ments in this field, and in learn-
ing how to meet problems of inter-
group tension and conflict as these
arise in school and community.
The workshop carries two hours
credit, and may also be taken as
a non-credit course.

1 '

MARILYN MASON
.. . to present organ concert
and Creston at 8:30 p.m. Monday
in Hill Aud.
Prof. Mason will open her Mon-
day concert with Johann Walther's
Concerto del Signor Torelli. fol-
lowed by The Musical Clocks, by
Franz Josef Haydn.
Also included on the program
are Johann Sebastian Bach's Pre-
lude and Fugue in D Major, Deux
danses by Jehan Alain, and Jean
Langlais' Epilogue, sur un theme,
de Frescobaldi, pour pedale solo.

A

COM E TOrClHUIJRc H

A

ON

7 h~

AB B ATHr

A

__14

I I

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.
and 12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Class in Christian Doctrine: Mon. and Thurs. at
8:00 in classroom of Gabriel-Richard center.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, and Eugene
A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 11:00 Worship: "Our Christian Herit-
age" L. Burlin Main.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
'STUDENT GUILD
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
524 Thompson St.
Donna Hamilton, Associate
9:00 A.M. Sermon by Rev. Russell Fuller: "The
Sacrifice Acceptable to God."
5:30 P.M. THE STUDENT GUILD will hold its
Program, picnic, and recreation at Saline Val-
ley Farms. Speaker, Rev. J. Edgar Edwards.
"CAN WE VALIDLY DEFEND A PERFECTION-
IST POSITION?"
Rides from Guild House 5:00 P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Children's Activities.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M., "Re-
incarnation."
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.,
WPAG (1050 kc).
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Dr. Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Dr. William Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Summer Communion 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M.--
Mr. Laurent, preaching.
11:30 A.M. Student Coffee Hour
5:00 P.M. Summer United Fellowship. Meet at
church to go to Saline Valley Farms. Rev. Ed
Edwards, speaker.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion with breakfast
following in Canterbury House.
9:00 A.M. Family Communion and Sermon.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Commentary.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
Guest Minister, Rev. John H. Schaal
(Bible Instructor, Reformed Bible Institute,
Grand Rapids)
9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship Service: "Glad Tid-
ings of Peace' (Isaiah 52, vs 6 and 7)
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service: "The Way
of Revival (Isaih 55, vs 6 and 7)
GRACE BIBL E C H URCH
Corner State &Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. "The Supreme Qualification"
7:00 P.M. "Jacob's Ladder"
Sermons by Rev. Elmer Katterjohn.
WE WELCOME YOU.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Summer Sunday Evening Series. "The Growth of
Creativity."
Sunday, August 3rd, 8:00 P.M., Gardner Williams,
Chairman, University of Toledo Philosophy De-
partment-"Humanism As A Creative Force."
THE CHURCH- OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Lester Allen, Minister
Sundays: 10:00, 11 :00 A.M., 6:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M.
Mondays: 7:30 P.M. Men's Training Center.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Forest Ave.
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service-Sermon, "Restless
Hearts," Mr. Chandler Hadley.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 A.M. Bible Study
Sunday at 10:45 A.M. Worship Service, with ser-
mon by the Vicar, "Testimony, the Outgrowth
of Faith"
Sunday at 6:00 P.M. Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program. "The Life of
Christ in Stained Glass"
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.

.4'

b

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A.J

'4 , e a a
DRIVE A NEW CAR TONIGHT
BARGAIN EVENING RATE
Keep social engagements in a
gleaming new Ford or other
fine car! From 5 P.M. Friday
until 9 A.M. Monday, only
$10000

I

*1

I

FIRST CHURCH OF
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

CHRIST,

y -S A N D L E R OF BOSTON'S BALLET-TIE ...the classic tie, trimmed
and slimmed and sophisticated. Weightless as a dancer's sliper .. . tapered

9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main' Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat.
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to

I'

4

terrific! Leave it to Sandler to turn the classics into fresh new fashion.

I

I

sV,

i

I

I

I1

I

9.30 A.M. Bible Study

11

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