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July 26, 1958 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-26

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THE MCIGAN DAILY
F REVIEWS EVENTS:

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West's Prestige Declining Daily in Middle East

'U' To Present Recitals,
Teachers' Lecture, Film

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stroyed Turkey's domination of
the area.
What set it in motion? What
directed its enmity toward the
West?
Three Word Answer
The answer possibly can be
summed up in three words: Israel
and Nasser.
A movement such as national-
ism needs a pole around which to
cluster. It needs something to give
it direction and unity. First Israel,
then Nasser filled the role.
May 14, 1948 - Israel declared
its independence and received
quick recognition from the West.
Within four days, six of its Arab
neighbors invaded the little Jew-
ish state.
The United Nations negotiated
a cease-fire but it did nothing to
ease the enmity Arabs held for Is-
rael. For the first time in cen-
turies, long-feuding Arab states
had a common, burning cause:
hatred of Israel.
Negative Pole
But the pole around which Arab
nationalism clustered was a nega-
tive one and great movements are
rarely built on negative causes. A
positive pole was needed - and it
was not long in coming.
July 26, 1952 --- Dissident Egyp-
tian Army officers, ostensibly un-
der the leadership of MaJ. Gen.
Mohammed Naguib, ousted King
Farouk and packed the dissolute
monarch off into exile.
Egypt became a republic with
the genial, stolid Naguib as presi-
dent. But it soon became appar-
ent that the power behind the
coup was Lt. Col. Gamal Abdel
Nasser.
Nasser Sets Bloc
Nov. 14, 1954 - Nasser ousted
Naguib and assumed power in
name as well as fact. He quickly
set about organizing an Arab bloc
and soliciting aid from both East
and West.
Sept. 27, 1955 -- Nasser an-
nounced that Egypt would accept
arms from Communist bloc coun-
tries, thus giving Soviet Russia its
first open toehold among the Arab
nations.
Dec. 17, 1955 - Britain and the
United States announced plans to
help Egypt finance a billion dollar
high dam on the Nile River at As-
wan. Nasser's stock rose in the
Arab world.

June 23, 1956 - Nasser
elected President of Egypt.

was

U.S. Withdraws
July 19, 1956 - The United
States withdrew its offer to help
finance the Aswan High Dam,
thus upsetting Nasser's economic
plans. The Arab world waited
tensely to see if the Egyptian
president would retaliate.
July 26, 1958 - Egypt nation-
alized the Suez Canal and made
it stick. Clearly, here was the posi-
tive pole around which Arab na-
tionalism could cling.
The United Nations tried to set
up an 18-nation plan for inter-
national operation of the Suez
Canal. The Soviet Union, moving
deeper into Mideast politics on the
side of the Arabs, vetoed the pro-
posal.
Israel Invasion
Oct. 29, 1956 - Israel invaded
Egypt's Sinai Peninsula in an ef-
fort to wipe out bases of comman-
dos who had been harassing the
borders of the Jewish state.
Oct. 31, 1956 - Britain and
France bombed Egyptian installa-
tions and, five days later, landed
troops in Egypt to protect the
canal. The Egyptians promptly
blocked the canal with sunken
ships.
The United Nations negotiated
a cease-fire and Britain, France
and Israel agreed to withdraw
their troops. The world waited
for the dust to clear to see if
Nasser's prestige had suffered by
the shellacking. It hadn't.
Defies Military Power
In fact, Nasser's stock shot up
among Arabs. He had defied the
military might of the three invad-
ers and, in the confusion, wound
up being supported in the UN by
both Russia and the United States.
Since Suez, " the Arab nations
have moved steadily away from
the Western camp.
March 9, 1957 - The U. S.
Congress authorized the use of
American troops and economic
aid to combat communism in the
Middle East. This "Eisenhower
Doctrine" was greeted with some-
thing less than enthusiasm by the
Arabs.
March 13, 1957 - Jordan ended
its nine-year-old alliance with
Britain. The British agreed to re-
move all their troops from Jordan
within six months.

MRS. CLIFFORD MILLER
... Mid-East talk
To 0Discuss
Middle .East
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, adminis-
trative assistant to the Interna-
tional Center, will give her im-
pressions of the Middle East in a
talk, "Passage Beyond the Sphinx,"
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Uni-
tarian Church.
This talk will be the fifth in the
church's summer lecture series on
"Creative Forces in Society." Mrs.
Miller will describe her experiences
during six months of traveling
through Egypt, the Sudan, Iran,
Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon.

Student Recitals ..
Two student recitals will be pre-
sented by the School of Music to-
morrow.
Richard David Harrison, Grad.,
clarinetist, will present a recital
at 4:30 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
The program will "Concerto in B
flat" by Karol Kurpinski, "Sonate"
by .Hindemith, "Concertino" byI
Grovlez, "Improvisations" by Cap-
let, and "Trio Pathetique for Clar-
inet, Bassoon and Piano" by
Glinka.
He will be accompanied by
Caryl Miller, '59SM, piano and
assisted by Gerald O'Connor,
Grad., bassoon,
John Zei, Grad., baritone, will
present a recital at 8:30 pn, in
Aud. A, Angell Hall. He will be
accompanied by Joyce Noh, Spec.,
piano, and a small ensemble. His
program will include works by
Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Massenet,
DuParc, Vidal and Barber.
Both recitals are being presented'
in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the masters degree
in music and are open to the pub-
lic without charge.
English Lecture . ..
Prof. A. K. Stevens of the Eng-
lish department will lecture on
"Motivating the Composition Stu-
dent: A Demonstration Class" at
4 p.in. Monday in Aud. C, Angell
Hall.
This will be the final talk in the

summer conference series for
teachers of English on "Special
Problems in the Teaching of High
School English." Prof. Stevens is
the editor of "The Newsletter," a
publication of the Michigan Coun-
cil of the Teachers of English.
Prof. C. D. Thorpe of the Eng-
lish department will be chairman
for the program.
The purpose of this Conference
Series is to furnish opportunity
for high school and college teach-
ers of English to get together to
examine and discuss key teaching
problems.
A proseminar in English paral-
lets the lecture series.
Asian Studies Film .,,
"India, Pakistazi and Southeast
Asia," a film sponsored by the
Workshop in Asian Studies and
the Summer Session, will be shown
at 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Monday in
Kellogg Auditorium.
The film showings are open to
the public without charge.
Organization
Notices
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, picnic, discussion, Dr. Fred E.
Luchs, lawn.,Presbyterian Church.
Graduate Outing Club, swimming,
hiking and volley ball. Meet in back of
Rackham (N. W. entrance.)

4

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B~y TOM'HENSHAW
Associted Press Newsfeatures w seems to be getting more spectac-
ular with each passing day.
The decline of Western prestige Each new move by the West ap-
and influence in the Mideast pears to be greeted by a new out-

pouring of Arab nationalism.
Nationalism is not new to the,
Arab world. It was there in latent
form even before World War I de-

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, and Eugene
A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "is the Christian
Faith Practical?" Eugene A. Ransom.
2:00 P.M. Picnic and Vespers, meet at Wesley
Lounge.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
524 Thompson St.
Donna Hamilton, Associate
9:00 A.M. Sermon: "Why Are You Cost Down?"
5:30 P.M. The Student Guild will hear Dr. Fred
E. Luchs, Minister of the Congregational
Church, on "Grass Roots of Church Union,"
after a picnic, 5:30 P.M., back lawn of
Presbyterian Church.

.. i

G
t

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m., the day preced-
ing publication.

SATURDAY, JULY 26 1958
VOL. LXVIII, NO. 13S

Lectures
Confe'rence Series for English Teach-
ers: "Motivating the Composition Stu-
dent: A Demonstration Class." A. K.
Stevens, Assoc. Prof. of English. C. D.
Thorpe, Chairman. Mon., July 28, 4:00
p.m., Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Lecture in Public Health Statistics:
Dr. Frank Massey, Univ. of Calif., at Los
Angeles, on "The Place of Dstribution-
free Statistics in the Health Sciences."
Tues., July 29, 3:30 p.m., School of
Public Health Auditorium.
Public Lecture in- Survey Research
Techniques: Daniel Katz, Prof. of So-
ciology, on "Relationships between Lo-
cal and National Studies of Political
Behavior." Tues., July 29, 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Panel Discussion: "Music and the
Present-Day Church" is the topic of a

panel discussion to be held in Aud. A,
Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m., Tues., July 29.
Members of tlie panel will be Father
Gerard S. Brennan, Prof. of Sacred Mu-
sic, Sacred Heart Academy; Father An-
drew Missiras, St. Nicholas Greek Or-
thodox Church, of Ann Arbor; Rabbi
Julius Weinberg, Beth Israel Center,
Ann Arbor; and Marilyn Mason, Asst.
prof. of Organ.,Moderator for the panel
discussion will be Harold Haugh; Prof.;
of Voice. Open to the general public.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Prof. Mary
Haas, Univ of Calif., (Berkeley), on
"Some Genetic Affiliations of Algan-
kian." Tues., July 29, 7:30 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Concerts
Student Recital: Richard David Har-
rison, who studies clarinet with Wil-
liam Stubbins, will present a recital
on Sun., July 27, 4:30 p.m. Aud. A,
Angell Hall. He will be assisted by Caryl
Miller at the piano and Gerald O'Con-
nor on the bassoon. His recital is pre-
sented in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the degree of Master
of Music. Included on the program will
be works by Karol -Kurpinski, Hinde-
mith, Grovlez, Caplet and Glinka. Open
to the public.
Student Recital: John Zei,, baritone,
who studies voice with Chase Baromeo,
will be presented in a recital on Sun.,

July 27, 8:30 p.m. Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Mr. Zei will be assisted by Joyce Noh,
pianist, and an ensemble consisting of
Philip Mason, violin, Carolyn Lentz,
violin, Nancy Farrand, viola, and Earle
Boardinan, cello. His recital, which is
being presented in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Master of'Music, will include compost-
tions by Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, Mas,
senet, Duparc, Vidal and Barber. Open
to the general public.
Music and the Present-Day Church:
The University. Summer Session Choir
under the direction of Robert ?oun-
tain, Harold Haugh, lecturer, and Mari-
lyn Mason Brown, organist will present
a program in connection with the
Summer Session program "Religion In
Contemporary Society." This concert
program will be held in Hill Aud., Mon.,
July 28, 8:30 p.m., Open to the general
public.
Stanley Quartet: The last of the,
Summer Series by the Stanley Quartet;
Gilbert Ross, first violin; Gustave Ros-
seels, second violin, Robert Courte, vi-
ola and Robert Swenson, cello, will be
presented Tues. July 29, 8:30 p.m. Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Included on the pro-'
gram are Mozart's "Quartet in C major,"
Ravel's "Quartet in F major," the Halff-
ter Quartet which was commissioned by
the University of Michigan and dedi-
cated to the Stanley Quartet, in addi-
tion to the first performance of "Five
Pieces for String Quartet" by Leslie

Bassett. Open to the general public
without charge.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Eugene
Willard Troth, Music; thesis: "The
Teacher Training Program in Music at
Chautauqua Institution, 1905-1930,"
Mon., July 28, 708 Burton Mem. Tower,
4:00 p.m. Chairman, A.P. Britton.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS
NEW YORK STATE, CIVIL SERVICE,
announces examinations for the follow-
ing: Associate Publicity Agent, Senior
Publicity Agent, Editorial Assistant,
Health Publications Editor, Psychiatric
Social Worker, Youth Commission Area
Director, Institution Education Direc-
tor, Institution Education Supervisor,
Associate Librarian, Senior and Assist-
ant Library Supervisors, Film Produc-
tion Aide, Veterinarian, Engineers, Ac-
countants, Research Analyst, and Home
conomist.
'TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY,
Knoxville, Tenn., has a vacancy for a
MATHEMATICIAN in the Computing
Center in Chattanooga, Tenn. Prefer a
candidate with a doctorate degree but
a master's degree in mathematics with
knowledge of mathematics involved in
computer programming would be ac-
ceptable.
For further information contact the

Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.
THE AIR FORCE DEPENDENT SCHOOL
has listed teaching' vacancies for over-
seas positions. Teachers with two years
of teaching experience, a college de-
gree, and a valid state Teaching Certifi-
cate, will be immediately considered for
the 1958-1959 School Year.
Vacancies exist in the following fields:
Elementary; Mathematic; Spanish/En-
glish; English/Latin: Remedial Reading;
Math/Science; English/SS/PE; Chem-
istry/Biology; Elementary Home Eco-
nomics; Elementary/ Industrial Arts;
Physical Science/Math; English/Math;
Science/Home Economics; English/So-
cial Studies; Music/Social Studies; Phy-
sical Education/Math.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admini-
stration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext. 389
or
OVERSEAS RECRUITING
CIVILIAN PERSONNEL OFFICE
SELFRIDGE AIR FORCE BASE
MICHIGAN
HOWARD 3-0511, EXT. 2125

FIRST CHURCH OF
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

CHRIST,

9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11 :00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister

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"Your Picture."
Worship Service, Sunday School, and Nursery at
10:45 A.M.
THE STUDENT GUILD, "Grass Roots of Church
Union," Dr. Fred E. Luchs. A discussion and
picnic 5:30 P.M. at Presbyterian Church. Rides
from Guild House at 5:20 P.M.
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Dr. Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Dr. William Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Morning Worship 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M.--
Dr. Baker, "A Christian Style of Life."
11:30 A.M. Student Coffee Hour.
5:00 P.M. Summer United Fellowship.
Wed. 8:00 P.M. Bible Study.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion with breakfast
following in Canterbury House.
9:00 A.M. Family Communion and Sermon.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Commentary.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
4:00 P.M. Picnic followed by program. Dis-
cussion on China.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Children's Activities.
SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner 5th Ave. & Beakes St.
Welcomes Summer School Students!
Rev. C. W. Carpenter, Minister
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship-Sermon by the
Pastor,
5:00 P.M. B./.P.U. Meeting.
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "The Blessing of the Triune God,"
7:00 P.M. "The Second Coming of Christ."
WE WELCOME YOU.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H Redman, Minister
Summer Sunday Evening Series. "The Growth of
Creativity." f
Sunday, July 27th, 8:00 P.M. Mrs. Clifford R.
Miller, University of Michigan International
Center-"Passage Beyond the Sphinx."
THE. CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Lester Allen, Minister
Sundays: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 6:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M.
Mondays: 7:30 P.M. Men's Training Center.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Forest Ave.
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service-Sermon, "Priviledges
of the Christian."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore Kriefatl, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 A.M.: Bible Study Group.
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.: Worship Service, with
sermon by the pastor, "Ampler Information
According to the Scriptures."
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Showing of
sound-color movie, "God's Word in Man's
L anguage."
Tuesday 11:45 A.M. to 1:00 P.M.: Luncheon
Meeting in Mich. League Conference Room
No. 2.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh
Pickett, Ministers.
SUMMER SCHEDULE
9:00 A.M. Family Worship Service.
9:45 A.M. Student class in Religion.
11:00 A.M. "Gird Up Thy Loins," Mr. Pickett
preaching.

11

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sparkling jewel tones all woven into beautiful
100% wool loomed by St. Mary's especially
for Chestnut Hill sportswear. Come in soon
and choose from our colorful assortment, Sizes
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14.95
SPORT SHOP - THIRD FLOOR

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CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H Palmer. Minister
Guest Minister) Seminary Grad Fred Oiemer

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