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July 20, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-20

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Dun THE MICHIGAN DAILY
'$' Sf. :.e.in~f':f,;9,:'h"D.'~iiLY OFFICIAL:,Y: BULLETIN;SY Y; . : : AIY 'O FCI L U LE I

SATURDAY. ,1

_3x

-Daily-Eric Arnold
ASSEMBLING YEARBOOK-High school students at the Journalism Workshop work at assembling
a yearbook. From left to right are Nancy Sternberg, of Royal Oak, Nanci Brown, of Flint, Sharon
Adams, of Royal Oak, Marybrown Johnston, of Madison Htights, Mich., Marianne Dahl, of Flint,
and Vernon Vander Weide, of Grand Rapids.

Teens Learn 1
Public ation
Techni que
(Continued from Page 1)
with various make-ups in search,
of more appeal and interest. z
"Our yearbook has had the same
format for years," commented
Nanci Brown, of Flint Central
High. "I think our student body{
would like' a fresh approach in our
'Prospectus', and I've gotten manyI
.new ideas from the workshop1
which I'd like to try." Nanci will
be senior co-editor of Central
High's yearbook.
The campus Asian Cultures
series has given the newspaper sec-
tion an excellent situation for de-
veloping reporting skills. Members
cover lecture assignments and do;
personal interviews.
Knowledge Broadened
"This has certainly broadened
my knowledge of how news is col-
lected," said David Parish of Broad
Ripple High School, Indianapolis.
"And I've learned more about sdch
things as photography and the
other chores that help run a
paper. "
Another project is a feature
series on teen-age problems. Prof.
Field reported that students were
particularly enthusiastic a b o u t
this. "They feel that much of the
writing about teen-agers in com-
mercial magazines has, the 'de-
linquent' stamp. By writing from
their own viewpoint, they can ac-
complish something valuable to
themselves and the profession."
Stanley Quartet
To Give Concert
University Stanley Quartet will
give the second in a series of three
Tuesday concerts at 8:3 Op.m.,
Tuesday, in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Program wil linclude "Quartet
in E-flat major," by Haydn;
"Three Pieces for String Quartet"
by Stravinsky; "Five Pieces from
the Mikrokosmos," by Bartok; and
"Quartet in B-fla, major," by
Brahms.

Mental Processes Said
Chemical, Not Electronic

Mental processes should be con-
sidered as complicated chemical
reactions rather than electronic
circuits, Dr. Wayne Umbreit said
yesterday in a lecture under the
auspices of the bacteriology de-
partment.
Dr. Umbreit, associate director
of the Merck Institute for thera-
peutic research, based his state-
ments on many recent investiga-
tions, including experiments , he
has done with synthetic drugs.
These drugs will cause rats to
become mentally abnormal, as will
i s o l a t io n. Tranquilizing com-
pounds will remove symptoms
from either cause.
Evidence seems to indicate, he
said, that the same reaction is
arising from either the chemical
or environmental stimulus.
Since brain cells are essentially
chemical in nature, and depend
upon chemical reactions for their
energy, it is reasonable to assume
that the nature of nervous re-
sponse is prinmarily chemical.
Station Slates
V r-
iU' V Series
The University's Television ser-
ies "Understanding Our World"
will be presented at 9 a.m. July
21 over WXYZ-TV.
The subject will be "Art and
Nature," exploring Eskimo sculp-
ture as an expression of his total
enviVonment.
At 9:45 a.m. Accent: A Michigan
Report will present Prof. Benja-
min Quarles, Chairman of the De-
partment of History at Morgan
State College.
Prof. Quarles will examine the
Negro contribution to American
culture.
The University's program Tele-'
vision Hour at 10 a.m. will dis-
cuss the reasons. why so many
modern marriages fail.
The second half hour will be the
music, of a modern Hurngarian
composer, the late Bela Bartok.

Dr. Umbreit postulates that ex-
ternal experience causes produc-
tiion of specific molecules in the
brain, which are then stored as
"memory," and may interact to
create new responses.
This interaction of already
formed molecules to produce a
new molecule could explain, ac-
cording to Dr. Umbreit, the ori-
gin of s o - c a ll e d "creative"
thought.
Organization
Notices
Cercle Francais: R. Niess, "Zola et
soan Temps," Tues., July 23 at Michi-
gan League, 8:00 p.m.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild: Panel Discussion --"The Stu-
dent in Japan" by four students from
Japan, 7:00 p.m. July 21, Guild House,
524 Thompson.
* * *
Graduate Outing Club: Swimming
and supper, Sun., July 21, 2:00 p.m.,
RackbAm.
* * *
Hillel: Supper Club, July 21, 6:00 p.m.,
Hillel. Call NO 3-4129 for reservations.
International Students Assoc. Picnic:
July 21, Bishop Lake. Leave Int'l Cen-
ter at 10:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
Transportation provided if necessary.
Games, swimming, entertainment. Am-
erican students invited to meet stu-
dents from other lands. $1.00 per per-
sun inclunes food and transportation.
If interested see Helen T1 tis, Room 18,
Int'l Center, Ext. 3358.
S* *
Lutheran Student Association: 7:00
p.m.. July 21, Lutheran Student Cen-
ter. Dr., George Mendenhall "The
Church in the Field of Education."
Lutheran Chapel: Bible Study Sun-
day at 9. Worship Service with Holy
Comunion at 10. (U-M summer stu-
dents will join other Lutheran stulents
for all-day outing at Bishop Lake.
Phone NO 3-5560 for further informa-
tion, No supper at the Lutheran Stu-
dent Center Sunday.
Pi Lambda Theta: Initiation of new
members, July 22, 7:30, West Confer-
ence Room,-Rackham Building. Mem-
bers of all chapters invited.
1I

(Continued from Page 2)
gell Hall. Lecture followed by a tour
of the TV studio.
Foreign Language Program: Public
Lecture: The fourth lecture in this
series will be given on Wed., July 24 at
4:10 p.m. in Room 429, Mason Hall by
Prof. Stanley Sapon of Ohio State Uni-
versity. He will speak on: "Prognosis
and Achievement Testing in Foreign
Language Teaching." Public invited.
Concerts
Student Recital, 8:30 p.m. Sun., July
21, by Sylvia Sherman, oboist, in Aud.
A, Angell' Hall. in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the Master of
Music degree. -Miss Sherman studies
oboe with Florian Mueller. and her
program, including works by Loeillet,
Bach, Telemann, Piston and Masade-
sus, will be open to the public,
Student Recital: Marleta Blitch, pi-
anist, in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the degree of Master of
Music degree at 8:30 p.m. Mon., July 22
in the Rackhiam Assembly Hall. A pu-
p11 of Joseph Brinkman, Mrs. Blitch
will perform works by Bach, Dello Joio,
Schubert, and Franck. Open to the
public.
Stanley Quartet, Gilbert, Ross and
Emil Raab, violin, Robert Courte, vi-
ola, Robert Swenson, cello, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesd., July 23, Rackham Lecture Hall
This is the second in a series of three
summer concerts. It wiji include
Haydn's Quarter in E-flat major, Op.
33, No. 2, Stravinsky's Three Pieces for
String Quartet (1914), Bartok's Five
Pieces from the Midrokosmos, and
Brahms' Quartet in B-flat major. Op.
67. Open to the general public without
charge.
Academic Notices
Schools of Business Administration,
Education, Music, Natural Resources
and Public Health.
Students who received marks of L
X, or 'no reports' at the end of their
last semester or summer session of at-
tendance will receive a grade of "E"
in the course or courses unless this
work is made up. In the School of Mu-
sic this date is by July 22. In the
Schools of Business Administration,
Education, Natural Resources and Pub-
lic Health this date is by July 24. Stu-
dents wishing an extension of time
beyond these dates in order to make
up this work should file a petition, ad-
dressed to the appropriate official of
their School, with Room 1513, Admin-
istration Building where it will be
transmitted.
Seniors:. College of. L.S.&A.,. and
Schools of Education, Music, Public
Health, and Business Administration:
Tentative lists of seniors for August
graduation have been posted on the
bulletin board in the first floor lobby,
Administration Building. Any changes
therefrom should be requested of the
Recorder at Office of Registration and
Records window number A, 1513 Ad-
ministration Building.
French Luncheon Table: Every Tues-
day noon, in the South Room of the
!vMichigan Union Cafeteria, 'those wish-
ing to speak French will meet for lunch.
Doctoral Examination for Harry Eu-
gene Stubbs, Jr., Chemical Engineering;
thesis: "Heat and Momentum Transfer
from the Wall of a Porous Tube," Sat.,
July 20, 3201 East Engineering Building,
at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, S. W. ,Churchill.
Doctoral Examination for Joseph
Motto, Education; thesis: "An Investi-

gation of Some Personality Correlates
of Empathy in College Teachers," Tues.,
July 23, East Council Room, Rackham
Building, at 1:30 p.m. Co-Chairmen,
W.R. Dixon and W.C. Morse.
Placement Notices
The following vacancies are listed
with the Bureau of Appointments for
the 1957-58 school year. They will not
be here to interview at this time.
Albion, Michigan - Elementary; Jr.
and Sr. High Industrial Arts* Special
Education (Vocal Music, Speech Cor-
rection).
Caledonia, Michigan - 5th grade; 7th
grade.
Farmington, Michigan - Elementary;
JHS full time librarian; JHS General
Science,
Howell, Michigan-Elem: Art, Speech;
Latin; Mechanical Drawing; Jr. Mathe-
matics.
Inkster, Michigan-Elementary (1-6);
Physics/General Science or 8th grade
Math; 9th and 10th English; Any two
of 7th Social Studies/Science/English,
New Haven, Michigan - Elementary
(1st or 3rd).
Milford, Michigan-Elementary (Kdg.
1st, 3rd, 5th).
Milwaukee 11, Wisconsin - Part time
Librarian; History/Mathematics/Coach-
ing; 6th grade,
Monroe, Michigan - Elementary (1st-
6th); Typing/Shorthand; Mathematics;
Auto Mechanics.
Monroe, Michigan - Elementary and
Jr. High Girls' Physical Education.
Pittsford, Michigan - Band Instruc-
tor - Band Instructor; Coach/Jr. High
Science.
Sandusky, Michigan - Elementary
and High Vocal Music.
St. Clair, Michigan - Mathematics;
Elementary.
West Branch, Michigan - Jr. Mathe-
matics.
Wolverine, Michigan - Instrumental
Music.
The following vacancies are listed
with the Bureau of Appointments for
the 1957-58 school year. They will not
be here to interview at this time.
Allen Park, Michigan - English; So-
cial Studies/Geography; Algebra/Gen-
eral Math; French; Latin,
Brethren, Michigan - Music Instruc-
tor/Driver Education or Math.
Brighton, Michigan - Elementary
(Kdg., 1st, later); Jr. High (7th, 8th).
Coloma, Michigan -, Bookkeeping/
Typing/Shorthand.
Delta, Ohio - Elementary (5th); JHS
English/Social Studies; Mathematics.
Fran14in Park, Illinois - French/
Spanish; Choral Music; English.
---I

Harbor Beach, Michigan - Science/
Chemistry; Physics/Maybe Biology.
Le Roy, New York - 7th and 8th gr.
Mathematics.
Melvindale, Michigan - Elementary
(Kdg., Primary); Art.
Modesto City, California - Art; Shop
Math/Freshman Math/Spanish 1; Auto
Shop; English; Chemistry or Physics;
Dean of Boys; Track Coach; Junior Col-
lege Electricity/Electronics/Radio/TV.
New Boston, Michigan - Elementary
(2nd, 4th, 5th); General Science; Metal,
Shop.
Rochelle, Illinois - English; English/
French; Mathematics/General Science.
Rochester, Michigan - English/Art;
8th and 9th gr. English; Latin/German
or French; Elementary (Kdg., 1st, 2nd).
Sidney, Montana-Librarian/English.
Superior, Wisconsin - English/Mu-
sic.
Toledo 5, Ohio-Asst. Football Coach/
History or Mathematics and Hygiene;
Special Education (slow learner class
Art.); Elementary (Kdg., 1st, 2nd/3rd,
4th, 5th, 6th).
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.
Personnel Requests:
Letourneau, Inc., Longview, Texas,
want recent graduates in Naval Archi-
tecture and Marine Engrg. Also need
men with experience. The company
manufactures heavy duty electrically
powered and controlled equipment, and
the positions are in the field of off-
shore drilling.
American Radiator and Standard
Sanitary Corp., New York, N.Y., is in-
terested in Engrs. for Management po-
sitions in Chem. Research. Metal. Re-
search, and Physics Research.
The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.,
Muskegon, Mich., has openings for a
Cost Accountant and for Engrs. to work
in Product Design, Supervision of Pro-
duct Engineering, and Mechanical Li-
aison.
Reichbold Chemical Inc., Elizabeth,
N.J., needs a Chemist or Chemical Engr.
with some experience in epoxidation
processes for vinyl plasticizers to work
in the Development Lab.
Brooklyn Botanical Garden, Brooklyn,
N.Y., has an opening for someone in
the Biological Sciences for the position
of Horticulturist and Teacher in a pop-
ular education program.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.
Ford Motor Co. has openings for five
nurses at the Rouge Plant, permanent,
full time, hours-3:30 p.m. to midnight.
Call the Bureau of Appointments for
details.
Ii

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Girl meets buopancy ..
WONDERFUL WARNERETTES
by WARNER'S
For the young of all ages, matching pantie girdles and girdles
perfect for sports or just looking pretty, with never a bone to
interrupt the lively comfort. In Warner's exclusive fabics--elostics,
sheerest power net, two-way stretches!
No. 474: Very lightweight, extremely controlling . . . girdle in
rayon-nylon elastic with 2" Sta-Up-Top. White, $8.50. Matching
pantie, No. 475, $8.50. Both in small, medium and large. War-
ner's circular-stitched bra, No. 21-70, $2.50.
24e Van iHuren S0p

j
' '.
J :Z.
K. {
,2 ",;j
t, .. ; .
i '.

,V

8 NICKELS ARCADE'

NOrmandy 2-2914

"There is but one God; there-
fore there can be but one
religion and all the prophets
have taught it."
-Baha'l Scriptures
Baha'I
World Faith
Weekly Public
Meetings
Tuesday, Jluly 23, 8:30 P.M.
MR. ROBERT GAlNES wiIl
speak on "The Coming of the
Kingdom" Baha'l Center, 1400
Granger. For further information
or transportation call Baha'l
Center, NO 8-9085.

go

11''

Come

to Church

Sunday

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....

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Sermon by Dr. Abbey:
"What Can We Expect from God."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
Prof. Leo Goldberg, Chm., Dept. of Astronomy,
"The International Geo-Physical Year-An
Adventure in International Cooperation," Sun-
day, July 21, 8:00 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST

LOOK AT THIS.'
r
C. I t"
. j1y
,' tjtti ll.
V: I :It f at {
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1833 Washtenaw Ave.

/

Summer Clearance of Sandals - Flats - Casuals -
and Dress Wedgies. All taken from our regular stocks of

11

9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Servico.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister,
Church School and Nursery, 10:45 A.M.
Junior and Junior High Worship in Douglas Chap-
el: 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship, 10:45 A.M. The Rev. Harry Kel-
logg, O.D., Th.B. will preach on "Out of the
Shadows Into the Sunlight of Loveliness."
The Student Guild will hold a panel discussion on
Japan at the Student Center, 524 Thompson
St.; Sunday at 7:00 P.M. All students are
invited.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES
8:00 Holy Communion (with breakfast following
at Canterbury House and discussion led by the
Chaplain).
9:00 Family Communion and Commentary.
11:00 Morning prayer and sermon (Holy Commu-
nion first Sunday of month).
8:00 P.M..Evensong in Chapel of St. Michael and
All Angels.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron.
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
William S. Baker, Campus Minister.
George Laurent, Associate Minister
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 10:30, Sermon
Topic: "To Say and to Do," Dr. Baker.
Geneva Fellowship meet at church for picnic at
5:30 P.M. Movie follows, "Major Religions of
the World."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 Morning Worship-Rev. William C. Ben-
nett.f
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service-Rev. William C. Ben-
nett.
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:00 Bible Study.
Sunday at 10:00: Worship service, with the pastor
preaching on "Christians Are Givers. (Holy
Coimunion will be celebrated.)
(All-Michigan Lutheran Student Outing at Bishop
Lake, with groups leaving the Center at 9;50,
in time for the 11 o'clock service.)
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.,
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
L. C. Utley, Minister.
Television: Sundays, 2:30 P.M., Channel 6, Lon-
sing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M., WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at Forest
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
7:00 P.M. "The Church in the Field of Educa-
tion," Dr. George Mendenhall.

di

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SUMMER
SSTUDENT
D IRECTORY
NOW ON SALE

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9:45 Church School.
11 :00 Church Worship. Sermon by Dr. Loucks. "A
Friendly Universe."
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
NewO uarter s:106 En stLibertv. 2ND FLOOR

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:00 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon: Thomas
Travis, preaching.
9:00 A.M. Church School.
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M. Panel Discussion on Japan led by Japa-
nese students. At the Guild House, \524

Al

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