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June 25, 1957 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-06-25

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JUNE 25, 1957'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PAGE SEVEN

; JUNE 25, 1957 THE MICHiGAN DAILY PAGZ SE~

1'' - 1 1 i W 0

$436,760.32 RECEIVED:
University Regents Accept Gifts, Grants, Awards

UniversityRegents accepted
gifts and grants totaling $436,-
760.32 at their June meeting.
Research on chronic diseases
under direction of Dr. Thomas
Francis, Jr., of the public health
and medical schools will be fi-
nanced over a period of six years
by a $150,000, grant from the Na-
tional Foundation for Infpntile
Paralysis, Inc., N.Y.
Included in the total was $189,-
427.12 in additions during the last
six months to 50 different estab-
lished funds.
Alumni Fund Grant
Largest amount in this category
was $160,133.35 in gifts to the
Michigan Alumni Fund during the
period from Nov. 1, 1956 through
April 30.
Foundation for Research on Hu-
man Behavior, Ann Arbor, granted
~.$20,000 to help support surveys of
consumer attitudes conducted by
Survey Research Center.
National Service Foundation,
Washington, D.C. granted $12,200
for support of research entitled
"Quantitative Measurement of Bi-
ological Productivity in the Great
{ Lakes," directed by Prof. David C.
Chandler and George H. Lauff of
the zoology department.
Two grants were accepted from
the Rockefeller Foundation, N.Y.;
one of $800 as an addition to the
Rockefeller-Kyoto Fund now be-
ing used to finance American Stu-
dies in Japan and Japanese Stu-
dies in the United States, and one
of $9,000 to send three members of
the medical school faculty to the
University of Antioquia, Mendel-
lin, Columbia.
Rockefeller's $8,650
Rockefeller Foundation also
granted $8,650 to cover expenses
of two Egyptian specialists in the
teaching of Englisn and also to
provide books and equipment for
work in linguistics in the Univer-
sity of Cairo, Egypt. The money is
to be used through Dec. 31.
Fund for Adult Education, White.
Plains, N.Y., granted $7,000 for a
promotion and distribution experi-
ment in connection with the study-
discussion program scries entitled
"Aging in the Modern World."
The fund is to be used from May 1
through April 30, 1958.
Micnigan Gas Association, Ann
Arbor, gave $7,500 for the Michi-
gan Gas Association Equipment
Purchase Fund.
Henry B. Steinbach Foundation,
Grosse Pointe, donated $6,500 for

the Dr. H. M. Pollard Intestinal
Reseaich Fund.
The estate of Beulah Hemen-
way, Alpena, donated $4,525 in
payment of a legacy to establish
the Beulah W. Hemenway Schol-
arship for Adelia Cheever House.
General Motors Corporation,
Detroit, donated $2,800 for a grad-
uate fellowship in electro-chemis-
try for 1957-58.
Procter and Gamble Company,
Cincinnati, gave $3,300 for the
Procter and Gamble Fellowship in
Chemistry Fund.
Union Carbide Chemicals Com-
pany, South Charleston, West Va..
gave $3,000 for the corporation's
summer fellowsnip in chemistry.
Pinewood Fund, Washington,

and Muskingum Watershed Con-
servancy District, New Philadel-
phia, Ohio, donated funys totling
$2,450 for the Pinewood Conserva-
tion Research Fund for use by the
School of Natural Resources in a
program of research and graduate
instruction.
Fund Fattened
Regents accepted $2,000 from
Ensign-Bickford F o u n d a t i o n,
Simsbury, Conn., for the Engi-
neering College Special Fund.
Regents also accepted $1,000
from an anonymous donor for the,
Governing Board Expense Fund.
Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, do-
nated two grants, one of $500 for
the company's fellowship in phar-
macy and one of $450 for the com-

Six Leaves of Absence
Approved by 'U' Regents

University Regents granted six
leaves of absence at their June
meeting.
Non-salaried leaves for 1957-58
were approved for Prof. Irving
Singer of the philosophy depart-
ment and Prof. Paul W. McCrack-
en of the School of Business Ad-
ministration. Prof. McCracken's
leave was an extension of his
present leave so he may continue
serving as a consultant with the
Council of Economic Advisors in
Washington.
Prof. Harold R. Blackwell of
the psychology departmentswas
granted a part-time leave so he
may continue supervising research
projects in vision and optics ad-
ministered by the Engineering Re-
search Institute.
McKeachie To Head Program
An additional part-time leave
was granted to Prof William J.,
McKeachie of the psychology de-
partment. He will be in charge of
a research program on improve-
ment of teaching methods to be
financed by a grant from the Fund
for ihe Aavancement of Educa-
tion.
Prof. Francis C. Evans of the
Department of Zoology was
granted 4 non-salaried leave for
the second semester of 1957-58.
He had been invited to serve as
visiting associate professor of zo-
ology st the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley.
Prof. Richard J. Porter .of the

School of Public Health was
granted a leave beginning tomor-
row through Aug. 27. Prof. PorterI
has received travel expenses
through a fellowship from the
China Medical Board, adminis-
tered by Louisiana State Univer-
sity, and will study the prevalence
of tropical diseases in Mexico.
Two Leaves Changed
The Regents also changed two
Sleaves.
Sabbatical leave granted to
Prof. Norman E. Kemp of the zo-
ology department for the entire
1957-58 year was altered to only
the second semester of 1957-58.
SNon-salaried leave granted to
Prof Edwin A. Engel of the Eng-
lish department was changed from
tne entire 1957-58 year to the first
semester of 1957-58.
Prof. Albert C. Spaulding of the
anthropology department has been
assigned to off-campus duty for
archaeological field work in the
Upper Peninsula and Isle Royale,
beginning June 10 and running
through the midd t of July.

pany' fellowship in pharmaceuti-
cal chemistry.
Holland Evening Sentinel, Hol-
land, Mich., donated $780 for the
University Press Club Foreign
Journalism Fellowship Fund.
Forney W. Clement Memorial
Foundation, Inc., Williamstown,
gave $766.26 for the Forney Cle-
ment Memorial Fund, used for
support of the hospital school pro-
gram at University Hospital.
Muskegon Gift
University of Michigan Club fo
Greater Muskegon gave $700 for
the club's scholarship fund.
Dr. Mark Zeifert. Fresno, Cal.,
and Dr. Richard C. Schneider, Ann
Arbor, gave $500 for the Edgar
Kahn Neurosurgery Fund.
Miscellaneous donors have given
a total of $845 for the Guy H. Jen-
kins Memorial Scholarship Fund.
The scholarships, a memorial to
Jenkins (who was Lansing bureau
chief of the Booth Newspapers),
will be usrd for journalism stu-
dents.
Scott Paper Company Founda-
tion, Chester, Pa., established the
Scott Foundation Award by pro-
viding a riinimum of $500 ard a
maximum award of $1,000 for an
outstanding student in each of
five successive classes enrolled in
the Department of Mechanical En-
gineering.
Additional Grants #
In addition to awards to stu-
dents, the foundation will make
an unrestricted grant of $1,000
each year to the Department of
Mechanical Engineering.
Additional gifts and grants were
received by the Regents from:
Babcock Estate, Wilmington, Del.;
Mississippi Valley Structural Steel
Company; Flint Civilian Auxil-
iary; Stubnitz Green Corp., Ad-
rian; University President Harlan
Hatcher; American Foundation
for Pharmaceutical Education;
Mrs. Clifford Woody, Ann Arbor;
Ukranian Students' Club; Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Toporek; Dr. John
W. Sheldon and Dr. Jerome W.
Conn, Ann Arbor; Arthur Pound,
Ann Arbor; and, Western Electric
Co., Chicago.

Borda Given
BA Degree
University Regents granted a
Bachelor of Arts degree to Enrique
James Borda, of Bogota, Colombia,
at their June meeting.
Borda, a victim of leukemia, died
May 26 in University Hospital.
The Regents made the degree ef-
fective May 21.
Borda's degree was recommend-
ed by the executive faculty of the
literary college which reported
that Borda made a "gallant ef-
fort to completedhis senior year at
the University"

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