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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 17, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDA.J

VFAIR MONOPOLY OF LAKES:
Speedboats._Endanger Other Water Enthusiasts

Picnic Set

By CARL JORDAN
r! Swish!

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speedboat whips by followed
ne or two waterskiers spray-
the water as they ride the

;

waves.
The hapless rowboat fisherman
itting a few yards away mutters
an oath and blames the speedboat
for his empty creel.
A month ago, a man who was
owing a water skier towards the
beach at Whitmore Lake acciden-
ally ran down- and killed a young
boy bathing at the beach. His only
excuse was that he didn't see the
boy - wasn't watching.
The great increase in motor-
boating in the past few years has
created many problems on Michi-
gan lakes which have public act
cess to the water.
There are between 500 and 700
public fishing sites in Michigan,
established to give all the people
an opportunity to get out on a
lake, even if they don't own a cot-
tage or lake frontage.
At the last meeting of the Con-
servation Commission in Lansing
chairman and Prof. Emeritus
Shirley W. Allen said fishermen
had been complaining to the Con-
servation b e p a r t me n t about
speedboating, and cottage owners
on lakes with public landings have
also been complaining.
These public landings were ori-
ginally established for the benefit
of fishermen. Anyone who put a
pole in his boat had a right to
use the lake.'But now the motor-
boat craze has thrown a new light

on the "equal rights" of all on
Michigan lakes.
The object of motorboaters now
seems to be, who can have the
most powerful engine and go the
fastest. The desire for speed, and
a feeling of power, frustrated in
recent years by traffic laws on the
road has now found a new and
unrestricted outlet in speedboat-
ing.
And the bug is hitting everyone.
Last Monday morning, in a local
"greasy spoon" where this wirter
regularly has breakfast, two work-
ing men were arguing whose boat
would go. fastest. One had a 60
horsepower outboard motor on his
12 foot skiff, and the other had
two 35 H.P. motors. Now with mo-
tors like that, it would take ap-
proximately 10 minutes to encircle
a body of water the size of Silver
Lake. And with two of them rac-
ing by every 10 minutes, what
chance do fishermen and swim-
mers have? Lakeside cottage own-
ers, too, feel "this is our lake, we
have exclusive rights on it. Let
those noisy outsiders go some-
where else." But they like to re-
tan the "right to be reckless' on
the lakes for themselves.
What can be done?
Prof. Allen says "It is the duty
of the Conservation Department
to provide the general public op-
portunity for using our natural
resources in an orderly manner.
"Present situation points to a
lack on conservation statesman-
ship in the past which allowed pri-
vate individuals to acquire the
largest waterfronts in Michigan

-Daily-Richard Bloss
SPEEDBOAT HOT-RODDERS - Swimming areas on many
southern Michigan lakes are endangered by these boats.

would go fishing in a designated
spot, They counted the fish they
motorboat was driven by every
caught.
Every other day. an outboard
few minutes. At the end of the
summer, when they compared the
number of fish caught on "motor-
boat days," and "non-motorboat
days," the results showed there
was no difference in the number
or size of the fish taken.
Prof. Lagler said, "There is no
noticeable effect on fish by the
running of outboard motors. The
motors disturb the fishermen
more than the fish. The effect is
psychological."
Cottage owners on several lakes
have taken steps. They have met
voluntarily and made a code of
ethics regulating speedboat opera-
tion on their lake. This has
worked on lakes with no access to
the general public.
But the most promising solution
to the problem is a law which was
recently passed in Michigan. This
law says motorboats of all kinds
must be registered and licensed
by the local sheriff, and the li-
cense must be displayed in large
figures on the boat for identifica-
tion purposes.
But this law is far from solving
the complete problem.
In the words of a conservation-
ist, "The multiple uses of lakes
must be reconciled. Priorities must
be established." Establishing pri-
orities, means the Conservation
Department must decide which is
the lmost important use of each
individual lake, swimming, speed-
boating, water skiing, or fishing.
One common suggestion has
been a law containing words to
phis effect: "Swimming only at
Silver Lake, fishing only on Half
Moon Lake, and speedboating only
at Whitmore Lake." Many believed
this would end the conflict be-
tween the different groups of
sportsmen,
MORE FUN THAN
A BARREL OF MONKEYS!
PLAY MINI GOLF
The Modern Miniature Golf Gama
Ypsi-Ann Golf Course Next to
Ypsi-Ann Drive-in Theater

By Center
Picnic sponsored by the Inter-
national Center is scheduled for
Sunday at Bishop Lake.
Transportation from Interna-
tional Center, entertainment, and
food will be provided. Cost will be
$1.
The outing will begin at the In-
ternational Center at 10 a.m.
Interested students should con-
tact Helen Tiotis in Room 18 at
the International Center.

LICENSING 'WEAKEST AREA':
National Safety Council
Hits MichiganWeakness
LASIG ) Naioa

V.

LANSING OP) -- A National
Safety Council report yesterday
Zad some strong criticism for
Michigan's driver licensing pro-
gram.
The report, an evaluation of the
State's traffic safety program,
said the major weaknesses were
the poor licensing progran and

lack of a'strong citizens' support
program.
"Michigan's driver license ex-
aminers are given only about two
hours of instruction when a 12-
day program is recommended by
the safety council." said Norman
Olmhan, district director.

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4.

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4

rinsing,

makes the
difference

t'

with the public left to take the
hindmost."
Local peace enforcement offi-
cers are not particularly interested
in the problem. There is a critical
lack of Conservation officers. And
the Conservation Department has
no jurisdiction over the boat op-
erators once they leave the public
site.s
But something is being done.

In 1949, when this problem first
became apparent, a group of in-
vestigators, headed by Prof. Karl
F. Lagler, chairman of the Univer-
sity Fisheries Department won-
dered if motorboating really did
have any effect on the way fish
bite.
During the summer of 1949,
they ranetests for hundreds of
hours. Every day, a group of men
ETI N

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Clothes are never any cleaner than the last rinse water.
That's why our laundry rinses your clothes with four to six
changes of water. To the final rinse, a special rinsing
agent is added. It removes dulling soap film from. clothes
just as. a lemon juice rinse gives added luster to a shampoo.
Let this complete rinsing keep your washables cleaner.
KYER MODELLAUNDRY &CLEANERS

-I

DAILY

OFFICIAL

BULL

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(Continued from Page 2)

known Indian dance team in a dance
recital of authentic Indian dances at
Hill auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on Fri.,
July 19. All seats are reserved. Tickets
are . available at the Hill Box Office.
Exhibition of Art by French Children:
A collection of drawings "Paris seen
by French School Children" will be on
view in the Romance Languages Build-
ing beginning at 2:30 p.m., Wed., July
17. Public is invited.
Lectures
Foreign Language Program: Public
Lecture: Prof..Emma Birkmaier of the
University of Minnesota will give the
third lecture in this series speaking
on "Current Problems in the Teach-
ing of Foreign Languages," Wed., July
17, at 4:10 p.m. Room 429, Mason Hall.
Public invited.
Asian Cultures and the Modern Am-
erican. "The Literary Climate in Japan
Today." Yukio Mishima, Japanese nov-
elist. 4:15 p.m. Thurs., July 18, Aud. B,
Angell Hall.
Concerts
student Recital* Mary Oyer, cellist,
4:15 p.m. Wed., July 17, in Rackham
Asse iy Hall, assisted by Phyllis Tri-
o1o, pianist, Joel Berman, violinist, and
David Ireland, violist; all-Beethoven
program, open to the public.
University Woodwind Quintet, Nelson
Hauenstein, flute, Florian Mueller,
oboe, Albert Luconi, clarinet, Clyde
Carpenter, French horn, and Lewis
Cooper, bassoon, assisted by Laurence
Teal, Bass 'clarinet, will be heard at
8:30 p.m. Wed., July 17, in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Compositions by
Handel, Danzi, Jongen, Bentzon and
Janacek. Open to the general public
without charge.
Carillon Recital by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, 6:30-7:15 p.m.,
Thurs., July 18, compositions and ar-
rangements for 3-octave carillon. (This
is another in the series of Thursday
evening recitals by Professor Price, usu-
ally performed beginning at 7:15. This
program has been scheduled earlier be-
cause of an outdoor concert by the
Summer Session Band.)
Student Recital: Joyce Noh, pianist,
in partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Master of Mu-
sic at 8:30 p.m. Thurs., July 18, in the
Rackham Assembly Hall. A pupil of
Benning Dexter, Miss Noh will perform
works by Bach, Mozart, Debussy and
Schumann. Open to the general pub-
lic.
Academic Notices
Students, College of Engineering: The
final day for dropping courses without
record will be Fri., July 19. A course
may be dropped only with the permis-
sion of the Classifier after conference
with the instructor.
A Seminar in Mathematical Statistics,
will meet on Thurs., July 18, at 4:00
p.m. in Room 3201, Angell Hall. Prof.
P. S. Dwyer will continue his discus-
sion of "Sampling from Finite Uni-
verses."

Classical Studies Coffee Hour: The
faculty, students, and friends of the
Department of Classical Studies are+
cordially invited to a coffee hour on
Thurs., July 18, at 4 p.m., in the East+
Conference Room, Rackham Building.
Professor Blake will present and dis-
cuss selections from his collection of
recordings of contemporary Greek mu-
sic.
Placement Notices
The following vacancies are listed.
with the Bureau of Appointments for
the 1957-58 school year. They will not
be here to interview at this time.
Albion, Michigan -- Jr. High Social
Studies.
Alpena, Michigan-High School Eng-
lish/Journalism; C olle g e, Freshman
English; Engineering/Technical Stu-
dies; Accounting/Economics; Librarian.
Avon Lake, Ohio - Elementary (1st,
2nd, 3rd); High School English/Speech;
High School English/Spanish; Jr. High
Mathematics.
Bellaire, Michigan - Business Edu-
cation.
Davenport, Iowa - Elementary (1st,
3rd, 5th,) Special Areas, Art/Science
(4th, 5th, 5th); Jr. High, Vocal Music;
Science/Mathematics; Industrial Arts
(Metal and Drafting) Sr. High, Coun-
seling; Latin; Journalism; Driver Edu-
cation Mathematics/Sophomore bas-
ketball coach or Social Studies/Sopho-
more basketball coach.
East Moline, Illinois - Homne Econ-
omics.
Escanaba, Michigan - Elementary

Rockford, Illinois - Boy's Physical
Education/Biology; Business Education;
General Metals; Girls' Physical Educa-
tion (Also swimming and dancing);
Guidance Counsellor; Mathematics;
Physics/Earth Science/Physical Sci-
ence); Social Studies/Debate Coach;
Zoology/Biology. Jr. High English; In-
dustrial Arts (graphic arts, wood shop,
general math); Latin/Spanish; Social
Studies/English.Possibly Girls' Physical
Education. Special Education - Deaf;
kducable Mentally Handicapped;
Speech Correctionists; Visiting Social
Counsellors. Elementary (Kdg-6th).
Springfield, Vermont - 9th grade
English; 11th and 12th English; Princi-
pal/5th grade.
Wayland, Iowa -- High School Foot-
ball, Basketball, Baseball Coach/Social
Studies; English; English/Speech; So-
cial Studies, Health, Science (6, 7,8)/
Jr. High Athletics.
Westfield, New Jersey - Sr. High,
Mathematics; Jr. High Art; Elementary
(2nd); Specialist (School Nurse).
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, Normandy 3-1511
Ext. 489.
Personnel Requests:

Chevrolet-Saginaw Service Mfg., Div-a
of GMC., Saginaw, Mich., has openings
in training for supervisory and execu-
tive positions in the Chevrolet Finan-
cial Organization for graduates in
BusAd., and Acctg.
An Ypsilanti attorney is interested in
someone to work as Associate Attorney.
Sparton Electronics, Jackson, Ohio,
needs a Cost Accountant who is fa-
miliar with estimating.
Transamerican Freight Lines, Detroit,
Michigan, has an opening for an Ac-
counting graduate with 2-3 years ex-
perience, to take charge of the Ac-
counts Payable Section.
..Canada Life Assurance Co., Jackson,
Mich., is looking for men in BusAd.,
Acctg. and Law for Life Insurance
Sales.
Socony Mobil Oil Co., Trenton, Mich.,
needspeople for Acctg., and Mech. E.
Dow Chem. Co., Midland, Mich., has
openings for men in BusAd., Acctg.,
Journalism, all Engrg., Chem., Physics,
and Math. for Acetg., Auditing, Credit,
Finance, Sales, Distribution and Traf-
fic, Purchasing, Research, Development.
and Technical Service.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

khomm.-
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627 South Main - NO 3-4185

--

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PUV~tv

I

Semi-Annual

Clearance

All items on this sale are from our regular stock of domestci and imported clothing
and furnishings. Both summer and regular weight goods are
reduced from 20% to 50%°!

LOOK AT THIS!'

(5th).
Glens Falls, New York - Sr. and Jr.
High Dramatics; Jr. High General Sci-
ence.
Hartford, Michigan - Elementary
(Kdg. 3rd); Jr. High Math/Science; Vo-
cal Music; Home Economics; English/
Social Studies.
Hume, Illinois - Elementary Music;
High School Coach; Jr. High Basketball
Coach/Social Science; High School
Principal/Science.
"ironwood, Michigan - College and
High School Biology; College and High
Sehool Chemistry; Grade School Vocal;
Grade School Art; Late Elementary;
Special Education (Crippled Children).
Lansing, Michigan - Jrt High, Vocal,
Art; Women's Physical Education;
Commercial; Vocational.
Linden, California - Spanish, Typ-
ing.
Mount Prospect, Illinois - Elemen-
tary (1st).
Muskegon, Michigan - Minister of
Music.
North Branch, Michigan - Algebra/
Geometry/Adv. Math./Physics; Driver
Training; Industrial Arts; Later Ele-
mentary (6th); Jr. High English; Latin;
Jr. High Band and Chorus or Elemen-
tary Music.
Ontonagon, Michigan-Jr. High Eng-
lish; Elementary (1st, 2nd, 3rd).
Perrysburg, Ohio - Elementary Art.
Port Huron, Michigan - Early Ele-
mentary;, Later Elementary (4th, 5th);
Jr. High General Science/Coach; High
School. Chemistry; Jr. High Homemak-
ing/Supervisor of Noon Lunch.

CLOTHING

REGULAR WEIGHT SUITS

SUMMER WEIGHT SUITS

formerly $125.00.,

formerly'
formerly
formerly
formerly
formerly

95.00.
85.00.
80.00 .
78.50 r

... NOW $98.50
... .NOW 76.00
... .NOW 68.00

formerly $105.00.

... .NOW $84.00
....NOW 76.00

I

I

formerly
formerly
formerly

95.00.

....NOW
.,..NOW

62.50
62.50

85.00
75.00.

.... NOW 68.00
.....NOW 60.00

rtn .
9- '
.,....

I

75.00 .....NOW 60.00

J

WASHABLE CLOTHES
Cords, Stripes, Solid Colors
$28.75 $19.95
39.75 29.95
52.50 41.95
59.50 46.95
(Good range of sizes, including extra longs)
Sport Coats and Slacks 20% to50%0off
(Alterations at Cost)

;i

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SUMMER

STU DENT

FURNISHINGS

I

DRESS SHIRTS
formerly 5.50 to 5.95 . . .NOW $4.45

HANDMADE NECKWEAR
formerly 1.50 to 2.00.. .NOW $ .95

TAKE YOUR DATE

DIRECTORY

formerly 6.25 to 6.95...NOW

formerly 8.95

*NOW

5.20
6.70

formerly 2.50
formerly 3.50
formerly 5.00

.......NOW
,... . .NOW

1.65
3.65

on a

On 'Campus Sale

20% to 50% off
Long and short sleeve sport shirts, Bermuda shorts, swim suits, straw
Bathrobes, Fancy belts, Pajamas, Caps, etc.

hats,

"BICYCLE BUILT FOR 2"

I air, /r% AV~

ALL SALES FINAL
{Summer Store Hours: Mon thru Fri. 9:00 to 5:30: Sat. 9:00 to 1 :00)

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