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July 16, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-16

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Forst

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 16,

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RQGRAMS ANNOUNCED:
Band Concert Schedules
Posted for This Week

1.

Programs in connection with the
Ninth Annual Band Conductors
were announced last night.'
At 9 .m. tomorrow the Chicago
Symphony Brass Ensemble will
present a recital in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall.
The concert will feature Law-
rence Teal on the bass clarinet and
will be held at 8:30 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater.
At 7:30 p.m. Thursday conduc-
tors and teachers of high school
bands and students of the various
colleges here at the university will

present their annual summer con-
cert.
The concert will feature several
guest conductors who are here
attending the Ninth Annual Band
Conductors -Conference.
William.D. Revelli, conductor of
the University bands will conduct
the band in five numbers: two
Scriabin Etudes,."Prelude,, Chorale
and Fugue," by Bach; "Highlights
from Kurt Weill," as arranged by
Yoder, and "Burst of Flame
March" by Bowes.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

j

Regents List
New Status
Of 'U' Staff
Regents approved changes in
the status of three faculty mem-
bers and gave two others permis-
sion to begin retirement furloughs
before reaching the age of 69 at
the July meeting, Friday, in Dear-
born.
Prof. Charles J. Gaa, acting
assistant dean of the Business
Administration school was named
assistant dean and professor of
business administration in the
School of Business Administra-
tion, effectvie at the beginning of
the 1957-58 academic year.
Prof. Gordon E Peterson of the
speech department was named
director of, the Speech Research
Laboratory.
Right to private practice in Uni-
versity Hospital, one-fourth time,
was given to Dr. Robert D. John-
son of the Medical School faculty.
Prof. L. A. Baier, chairman of
the Department of Naval Archi-
tecture and Marine Engineering,
and Prof. Efrmelindo A. Mercado
of the Department of Romance
Languages were given permission
for early furloughs.
Prof. Baier, who was 67 on Nov.
15, 1956, asked to begin his retire-
ment furlough at the end of the
summer session. He graduated
from the University in 1914 and
has been on the faculty since 1933.
Prof. Mercado will be 68 on Jan.
21, 1958, and will start his fur-
lough at the end of the first semes-
ter of the 1957-58 academic year.

A catalog from Peking and re-
cent re-emphasis and traditional
medicine in Communist China led
to the establishment of a tradi-
tional medicine exhibit in the
Kresge Medical Library.
The exhibit contains samples of
many manuscripts, recently pub-
lished in China, which are reprints
of old standard traditional medical
texts.
Portions of the original texts
were written well over 1,000 years
ago according to Raymond Nunn
of the University Library's far
eastern division.
Library officials' attention was
drawn to the rise of traditional
medicine when the library received
a catalogue of traditional medical
texts reprinted by the Communist
regime. Approximately 60 works
were reprinted and the library
ordered all of them.
Chinese revival of traditional
medicine began on a large scale
as recently as 1955. Nunn notes a
paradox in the fact that a so-
called "progressive" system has
had to revert to ancient practices
of medicine.
He said the revival might have
been due, in part, to the Com-
munists' inability to provide ade-
quate Western-style medical serv-
ices at this time.
It is estimated by Western ob-
servers that there are now 300,000
-practitioners of traditional medi-
cine in the far east. Most are in
China, but there are some practi-
tioners in India and Japan.
Traditional medicine differs
markedly from .its modern coun-

Three University students have
been awarded scholarships by the
Yellow Transit Freight Lines of
Kansas City for their work in var-
ious phases of highway transporta-
tion.
William E. Cox Jr., Grad, of
Ann Arbor is enrolled in business
administration and teaches exten-
sion courses in transportation.
He received his scholarship for
research on the relationship of
trucking costs to industrial loca-
tion in Michigan.
William A. Corson, '57E, of Ann
Arbor specializes in highway traf-
fic in the civil engineering depart-
ment.
He was cited for his work as a
research assistant in parking and
highway transportation studies.
Myron H. Nichols, of Joseph has
completed his graduate training

-Daily-Richard Bloss
TRADITIONAL MEDICAL TEXTS - Interesting text in the
Kresge Medical Library traditional medicine exhibit attracts the
attention of David Kronick, chief librarian, and Ruth Good,
Assistant Editor of the University Medical Bulletin.

and plans to make highway trans-
port his career.
He is now assistant dispatcher
with Bekins Van, Lines in Holly-
wood, Calif.
The scholarships were granted
through. the University's Trans-
portation Institute.
Yellow Transit Freight Lines
awarded a total of $1,000 to the
three students under its policy of
aiding American students interest-
ed in highway transportation.

(Continued from Page 2)
Creating Music in Elementary Schools."
Mary Jarman Nelson, Winter Park,
Florida. Tues., July 16, at 3:00 p.m.,
Aud. A, 'Angell Hall
Dr. Wayne W. Umbriet, associate di-
rector of the Merck Institute for Thera-
peutic Research, Rahway, N.J., will
speak on "Speculations on Chemo-
therapy" Mon., July 15 at 3:30 p.m.
in Room 1300 Chemistry Building. Aus-
pices of the Department of Bacteri-
ology.
Asian Cultures and the Modern Am-
eican. "Cultural Aspects of Burmese
Life." U Win, Ambassador from Burma.
4:15 p.m. Tues., July 16, Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Prof, Sol Saporta of Indiana Univer-
sity will present a Summer Linguistic
Forum Lecture entitled: "On the Pro-
bability of Obtaining a Complete In-
ventory," at 7:30 p.m., Tues., July 16,
in the Rackham Building Amphithea-
ter.
Dr. Charles Fisher, Department of
Psychiatry, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New
York City, will present a University
Lecture at 8:00 p.m., Tues., July 16, in
the Auditorium of Children's Psychia-
tric Hospital, on "Dreams, Images and
.Perception: a Quantitative Study of
the Poetzl Phenomenon." Sponsored by
the Department of Psychiatry.
Films
Showing of films and filmstrips for
elementary and secondary school
mathematics in Aud. D, Angell Hall at
3:00 p.m., Tues., July 16.
Concerts
Student Recital: Mary Oyer, cellist,
4:15 p.m. Wed., July 17, in Rackham
Assembly Hall, assisted by Phyllis Tri-
olo, pianist, Joel Berman, violinist, and
David Ireland, violist; all-Beethoven
program, open to the public.
University Woodwind Quintet, Nelson
Hauenstein, flute, Florian Mueller,
oboe, Albert Luconi, clarinet, Clyde
Carpenter, French horn, and Lewis
Cooper, bassoon, assisted by Laurence
Teal, bass clarinet, will be heard at
8:30 p.m. Wed., July 17, in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Compositions by
Handel, Danzi, Jongen, Bentzon and
Janacek. Open to the general public
without charge.
Academic Noatices
School of Business Administration:
Students from other Schools and Col-
leges intending to apply for admission
to the fall semester should secure ap-
plication forms in Room 150, School of
Business Administration. Applications
should be completed and returned be-
fore Sept. 1.
La Sociedad Hispanica of the Depart-
.ment of Romance Languages will hold
its weekly summer meeting on Tues.,
Organization
I Notices
Deutscher Verein: Kaffeestunde, 3:30,
July 16, South Cafeteria, Union.
Meeting. July, 7:30, Room 3-8, Union.
Speaker: Dr. Doerte Mulert from Berlin.

TRADITIONAL MEDICINE:
Red China Source of Kresge Exhibit

'U' Students Win Awards
In Highway Transportation

July 16, at 7:15 p.m., East Conference
Room, Rackham Bldg. Prof. Enriquec
Anderson-Imbert, writer and critic, will
speak in Spanish on "Lengua y Litera-
tura." There will be a period for ques-
tions and general discussion. All those1
interested are invited.
French Table: Every Tuesday noon in
the South Room of the Michigan Union
Cafeteria, those wishing to speakj
French will meet for lunch.
Mathematics Colloquium: Prof. Ed-
win Hewitt will lecture on "Harmonic
Analysis and Synthesis on Certain
Semi-groups," on Tues., July 16 at
4:10 p.m. in Room 3011, Angell Hall.
Social half hour in Room 3212, A.H.
preceding session.
Placement Notices
The following vacancy is listed with
the Bureau of Appointments for the
1957-58 school year. They will not be
here to interview at this time.
Abadan, Iran - The recently organ-'
ized Abadan Institute of Technology
located in Abadan, Iran (Persia) is in
need of a Professor of Mathematics
and Physics, preferably with the Ph.D.
degree..
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO. 3-1511, Ext.
489.
Personnel Requests:
Equitable Life Insurance Co. of Iowa,
Grand Rapids, Michigan, has positions
available in Sales. The positions involve
selling directly to the public with op-
portunities for management after three
years of selling experience.
Sparton Broadcasting Co., WWTV,
Cadilac, Mich., is interested in a Cam-
era Operator, Technical Director, and
an Announcer.
American Seating Co., Grand Rapids,
Mich., needs men in LS&A and BusAd
for Sales Training, and Mech. Ind., and
Elect. Engrg.
Dun and-Bradstreet, Inc., Grand Rap-
ids, Mich., has opportunities for men
to begin as Reporters, interviewing
business men and assembling facts
about businesses and writing reports.
Prefer graduates with Acctg., Econ., or
Journalism courses.
Random House, New York, has an
opening for a College Traveler to call
on universities. Since this job entails
a great deal of traveling, the publish-
ing company prefers to interview a
man.
Federal-Mogul-Bower Bearings Cp.,
Detroit, Michigan, has two openings in
Industrial Relations for recent gradu-
ates.
Mich. Civil Service announces an
exam for Civil Engrg. IV, and Civil En-
gineer VA.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin
Bldg., Ext. 3371.

terpart in both diagnosis and
treatment.
Practitioners of traditional med-
icine rely for diagnosis on obser-
vation of external conditions, ask-
ing questions, and taking. the
pulse. "Pulse law," dealing with
interpretation of the pulse count,
has been developed to a "fine art."
For treatment. traditional doc-
tore depend upon three main de-
vices: acupunture, cautery, and
drugs. Major surgery is not prac-
ticed.
Acupuncture Involves penetra-
tion of various parts of the body

with needles. The area at which
penetration takes place is deter-
mined by symptoms, age, and gen-
eral condition of the patient.
Traditional cautery involves the
searing of the skin by application
of heat.
Although the first two methods
of treatment can not be recom-
mended in the light of modern
medical practice, the traditional
use of drugs is somewhat better
developed by modern standards.
The traditional physician makes
use of Ephedrine, Eumerol, and
Chaimugra oil in addltional to
other drugs. Ephedrine is used in
modern medicine as a treatment
for asthma and hay fever.
One volume printed in China is
the Materia Medica of traditional
medicine. It was originally pub-
lished in the 16th century and
contains many common prescrip-
tions of the period.
Nunn pointed out that the tra-
ditional aversion to surgery stems
from two causes. First, is a dis-
like for "mutilating" the body.
Second, is the fate of a famous
traditional surgeon who was exe-
cuted when he desired to demon-
strate his skill on the monarch.

Square.Dance
Program Set
University summer session
Square Dances will be held from
8-10:30 p.m. tonight at Palmer
Field, according to Prof. George
Greey of the Physical Education
Department.
The square dances are spon-
sored by the Offices of Summer
Session and the Department of
Physical Education.
Callers are members of the Ann
Arbor Square Dance Leaders As-
sociation.
In case of rain' the square
dances will be held tomorrow
night.

Talks Continue
On College
Administration
The Third Annual Institute On
College Administration will con-
tinue at ,9 am. today in the Union.
General theme for today will be
"Curriculum Planning and Admin-
istration." Prof. Harold M. Door
will speak at the luncheon in the
Union at 12:10 p.m.
Tomorrow's theme will be "Re-
search in Leadership and Organi-
zation .Illustration of How the
Findings May be Applied to Col-
lege Administration."
Prof. Algo D. Henderson will
speak at the noon luncheon Thurs-
day. The general theme of the day
will be "Student Personnel Admin-
istration."
Friday the general theme will be
"Defining and Implementing Pur-
poses."
Read the Classifieds

ANNUAL SESSIONS:
28th Education Conference Begins Today

The 28th annual Summer Edu-
cation Conference will get under
way at 10 a.m. today with the film
"A School Goes to Town" in the
Architecture Auditorium.
In the first afternoon session
of the three-day conference, film
previews will be shown at 1 p.m.
in Schorling Auditorium.
Special interest sessions will in-
clude "A Demonstration Group of
Children Showing Self-Scection
in Reading Instruction," at the
elementary library of the Univer-
ity grade school.

Two other topics, "Teaching
High School Students to Express
Themselves;" in Schorling Audi-
torium, and "What's This, Miss
Jones: Elemenar.y Science Curi-
osity Stimulates Communication."
in the Elementary Auditorium of
the grade school will also be dis-
cussed.
In tomorrow's morning session
Prof. Alice Miel of the Depart-
ment of Curriculum and Teaching
at Columbia University will 'speak
'on "Building Socially Useful
Meanings Through Reading" at 9
a.m. in the Architecture Audi-
torium.
In the afternoon three special
dren and the Future," "What's
interest sessions, "Books, Chil-
New in Books for Teen-Agers,"
and "Helping Children Find the.
Right Books," will be offered.

"IT'S THE LIVING END"
"OLLIE'S CARAVAN"

Prof. Allison Davis of the Uni-
versity of Chicago will be the final
speaker of the Conference on
Thu r s d a y. His topic will be
"Reaching the Masses of Pupils."
Prof. Saporta
To Give Talk
Prof. Sol Saporta will speak
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheater as part of the Sum-
mer Linguistic Institute series.
The subject of the talk will be
"On the Probability of Obtaining
a Complete Inventory"
Prof. Saporta is a member of
the Spanish Department at Indi-
ana University.

9 P.M.- 1 A.M.

The NEW WHRV

1600

WHRV

1600,

r

Lecture Set
By Doctor
Dr. Charles Fisher of the Psy-
chiatry Department of Mt. Sinai
Hospital in New York City will
give a lecture at 8 p.m. today un-
der the auspices of the Depart-
ment of Psychiatry.
Dr. Fisher's topic will be
"Dreams, Images and Perception:
A Quantitative Study of the Poetzl
Phenomenon."
The lecture will be given in the

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auditorium of the
chiatric Hospital.

Children's Psy-I

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ANN ARBOR'S FINEST,
FINEST IN MUSIC AND FINEST IN FOOD
TAKE-OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
OPEN FROM 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8'P.M. - Closed Thursday
PHONE NO 2-0737

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OUR SPECIALTY.
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You'll find more than 500 dresses 'to choose everything
from fall casual cottons to evening and- bridesmaids
dresses. Dresses by fine makers of our traditional high
quality.

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YOURS AT OUR
SUMMER CLEARANCE PRICES

0

'"OUR GROUPS .. .

7.00, 10.00,

14.98 , 25.00

Originally were 10.95 to 49.95

Timely saving
on a Summer
Suit crop -
Pick the cream of

ON SALE TOMORROW

Extra special groups of
close-outs . . . 5.00

I r

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