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July 13, 1957 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1957-07-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1957

COUNT BASIE ON 24th:
Bhaskar and Sasha Perform Friday

Regents Accept Grants
Totalling $673,966.66

University summer session has
scheduled two professional enter-
tainment groups for the coming
weeks.
Bhaskar and Company, with
Sasha, will perform at 8 p.m. Fri-
day in Hill Auditorium, and Count
Basie and his orchestra will ap-
pear on July 24.
The supple Bhaskar, who has
made the Indian dance familiar
to American audiences, opens at
Hill Auditorium on Friday, with
Sasha, his skillful American part-
ner.
Reserved seats for the 8 p.m.
performance aresnow available at
Hill Auditorium box office.
Bhaskar and Sasha come to
Ann Arbor after many successes
on television and stage. They have
appeared on "Producers',jShow-
case," "The Alcoa Hour," "Arlene
Francis Home Show," and others
of equal calibre.
Performances at Carnegie Hall
fnd Brooklyn Academy brought
enthusiastic notices from Broad-
way reviewers.
Bhaskar won fame in India
where he played under the name
of Roy Chowdhury.
Son of India's foremost sculptor,
D. P. Roy Chowdhury., Bhaskar
first took up boxing but was
swayed to dancing by his mother.
He still carries scars as memen-
toes of those earlier days.
The mixture of athletics and
art has introduced an acrobatic
style into his dances. His lively
performances come closer to char-
acteristic Western extroversion,
and he is undoubtedly responsible
for the prominence Indian dances
now enjoy.
Chemotherapy
Lecture Series
Opens Monday
Dr. Wayne W. Umbreit will be-
gin a three lecture series on Mon-
day with the topic "Speculations
on Chemotherapy."
The series is in conjunction
with the University department of
Bacteriology and will be presented
at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday in Rm. 1300 of the
Chemistry Building.
Dr. Umbreit, associate director
of the Merck Institute for Thera-
peutic Research, will discuss "Bio-
chemistry of Behavior" in his sec-
ond paper.
The last lecture of the series will
be on "Comparative Cellular
Physiology."

r

INDIAN DANCE TEAM-Bhaskar and Sasha will perform
at Hill Auditorium

Bhaskar came to this country
in November, of last year.
He organized a troupe of dan-
cers, himself the only Indian. It
was here that he met Sasha who
so capably complements his na-
tive style.
They now have a contract for
a nationwide tour with Columbia
Artists, and the company is shoot-
ing a film on Indian dancing. Ne-
gotiations with MGM are promis-
ing their appearance on the
forthcoming production "Interna-
tional Review."'
Count Basie's popularity has
endured for 22 years.

-Those interested in knowing
why should plan to attend his
show at Hill Auditorium on July
24.
In 1936, Basie was a pianist with
Benny Moten's Kansas' City band.
Moten died an untimely death in
that year; members voted Basie
as their leader. The stage was set
for the Count's later fame.
A year later the immortal Ben-
nie, Goodman discovered Basie in
Kansas City's Reno Club. Im-
pressed with the unknown band's
rhythmic jazz, Goodman worked
the group in with his own book-
ings and signed them with Music
Corporation of America.

Bequests, gifts and grants total-
ling $673,966.66 were accepted by
University Regents yesterday at
their Dearborn. meeting.
The National Science Founda-
tion, Washington, D.C., made
grants totalling $146,700:
1) For development and Pro-
duction of alphatron pressure gage
systems and falling sphere tech-
nique in the International Geo-
physical Year rocketry program,
$75,500.
2) For support of research on
relaxation and resonance phenom-
ena in magnetic and dielectric cer-
amics, $25,000.
3) For research entitled "Gra-
phical Representation of Elliptic
Functions," $15,300.
4) For research on "Non-steady
Flow of Compressible Fluids"
aimed at finding ways to compute
flows of compressible fluids, $10,-
800.
5) A grant to support an aca-
demic year institute for high
school teachers of science, $9,000.
(The Regnets accepted $269,900
for this institute last December.)
Three additional grants for re-
search in mathematics and astro-
physics totalled $11,100.
Foundation Grant
Second largest grant of $111,-
230.39 came from National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis,
New York, for 1957-58 operation
of the Polio Respirator Center at
University Hospital.
Michigan Heart Association
granted a total of $46,050 fortre-
search by University Hospital and
faculty staffs.
The regents accepted $40,533
from Russell Sage Foundation,
New York, to be used for advanced
training and research in social
welfare.
From the estate of Orra H.
Blackmore of Ingham County the
University received $28,169.12. In-
come from the fund will be used
to assist worthy students with
preference to Ingham County
residents and descendents of World
War I veterans.
Sloan Gift
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, New
York, gave $27,500 as a grant-in-
aid to assist training of high
school science teachers.
L. J. Montgomery of Battle
Creek, a regular contributor, gave
$25,000 to establish the Carl Badg-
ley Fund for assistance and service
to crippled children.
Ford Foundation made a grant
totalling $22,700 for six doctoral
fellowships in business adminis-
tration and one doctoral fellow-
ship in economics.
A bequest of $19,056.30 was re-
ceived from Clyde D. DeWitt, a
long-time resident of Manila, P.I.,
who died in Nov. 1956. Use of the
fund will be determined at a later
date.

The first payment, $15,925, on a
grant of $31,850 was made by the
Fund for the Advancement of
Education, New York, to be used
in the utilization of college teach-
ing resources.
Forty-nine other corporations,
foundations and private donors
each contributed $1,000 or more.
There were 16 grants amounting
to less than $1,000. The regents
accepted offers from three corpor-
ations to establish scholarship
funds.
Regents Okay
University
Staff Leaves
DEARBORN - Nine leaves of
absence were approved at yester-
day's meeting of University Re-
gents.
Prof. Ross Lee Finney of the
Seshool of Music was granted leave
for creative orchestral work in
New York City for one month in
1958.
John B. Hagopian of the English
department was given leave for
the 1957-58 year to accept a Ful-
bright Lectureship in American
Studies at University of Kiel,
Germany.
Research Time
Prof. Frank Harary of the math-
ematics department will carry out
research at the Institute for Ad-
vanced Study at Princeton dur-
ing the forthcoming academic
year.
Arch W. Naylor of the Engineer-
ing Research Institute will study
in Holland under a Fulbright
scholarship in the 1957-58 year.
Richard P. Sonderegger of the
William L. Clements Library was
given half-time leave from June 1
to Sept. 3 for research on his
doctoral thesis.
Prof. William R. Taylor of the
botany department will attend a
colloquium on the ecology of algae
tto be held at Dinard, France.
Leave Given
Prof. Robert M. Thrall of the
mathematics department was given
one-third time leave to continue
directorship of Operations Re-
search Department, Engineering
Reserach Institute.
Prof. James H. Zumberge of the
geology department will conduct
glacial studies in Little America
during the 1957-58 year,
Military leave granted to Ken-
neth R. Morris of Engineering Re-
search Institute was extended
through September.
An off-campus assignment was
given Prof. Alvin F. Zander of the
School of Education to study in
Oslo, Norway under a Fulbright
grant.

APPOINTMENT:
Couch Will
Head Naval
Department
Richard Baily Couch, chief naval
architect in the Navy Depart-
ment's Bureau of Ships in Wash-
ington, D.C. was appointed chair-
man of the Department of Naval
Architecture and Marine Engi-
neering in the College of Engineer-
ing by the Regents yesterday.
Couch will also be a professor
of naval architecture and marine
engineering.
He was an engineering drafts-
man at the Philadelphia Naval
Shipyard, a naval architect at
the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,
Bremerton, Washington, an in-
structor in naval architecture in
the Bremerton Evening School.
He was a naval architect and
head of the Ship Division of the
David Taylor Model Basin and
a chief naval architect in the Navy.
"The Lovers of Mankind-these
are the superior men, of what-
ever race, creed or nation they
may be." --Baha'u'llah
BAHA'
WORLD FAITH
WEEKLY PUBLIC MEETINGS
Monday, July 15, 10:30 A.M.-
2:00 P.M.
Children's Workshop in World
Religions-Ages 6-12
(Children bring picnic lunch.)
735 Fountain St. NO 2-9248
Tuesday, July 16, 8:30 P.M.
Public Meeting --
Baha'i Center
"Christ and Bah'u'llah
1400 Granger NO 8-9085
Friday, July 19, 8:30 P.M.
Informal Discussion & Social
735 Fountain St. NO 2-9248

Bastille Day Tomorrow
Will Be Celebrated Here
Bastille Day will again be cele-
brated in the home of Prof. James cassion with no distinction of
C. O'Neil of the French depart- social class.
ment at 1023 Baldwin. This year two Frenchmen are
At 8:30 p.m. tomorrow Prof. in charge of Bastille Day. Prof.
O'Neil will open his home for Michel Benamou and Miss Colette
"French students and the French Odin are combining talents and
Colony at the University." ideas for a entertaining evening.
Bastille Day in France July 14, A new attraction this year will
1789 set off a spark which even- be French ideas portrayed by the
tually led to their independance. costumes. People will come dressed
Celebrations are gala affairs as French books, authors, dramas,
with street dancing, public enter- famous people, periods, or even as
tainment, and running parties. "Liberty. Equality, and Frater-
Bastille Day is a democratic oc- nity."

To help you cut the

4.

High Cost of Living

. 0 9

We are

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now offering

a Fast, Low-Cost

f

Self-Serve

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FROM 11 A.M. 'TI L 9:00 P.M.
(Waiter Service as Usual)
from 9 'til midnite
The Home of FINE FOOD
PC etjeI11EE
AIR CONDITIONED 120 E. LIBERTY

I

PROFESSORS TO LECTURE:
Beardsley, Blood Speak
On 'U' Television Hour

. ..

Come

to. Church

Prof. Richard K. Beardsley of
the anthropology department will
speak on the "Native Way of Life
in Soviet Asia Compared With
Life Under the Soviets," at 9 a.m.
tomorrow, on WXYZ-TV.
Prof. Beardsley will describe the
people of Asia in their native ways
and then contrast these traditions

with important changes since the
Russians came into control.
Directly following Prof. Beards-
ley will be the University's tele-
vision series "Accent: Michigan
Report" at 9:45 a.m.
The University's T e 1 e v i s i o n
Hour at 10 a.m. will have ass its
host Prof. Robert O. Blood of the
sociology department.
Prof. Blood will participate in
showing how a marriage counsel-
lor can help couples in trouble.

Sunday

Prof. Davenport Seeks Cause
Of Asian Influenza Epidemic
Prof. Fred M. Davenport of the
medical school, Director of the
Commission on Influenza of the:
Armed Forces Epidemiological
Board, and at the University has
been traveling In Japan and
Honolulu.
Prof. Davenport has been visit-
ing military and civilian areas in
the Far East where the influenza>
epidemic is in progress ::<: ... :...:......
He visited the 406th Medical
General Laboratory at Camp
Zama, thehNational Institute of
Health, the Kitasato Institute,
Tokyo Army Hospital and other
institutions.
Prof. Davenport's 17-day fact-
finding tour also included Aus- PROF. FRED M. DAVENPORT
tralia and the Philippines. . ..tours Pacific

f

FEINER PAINT CO.
216 W. William Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
Telephone NO 8-8014
We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors and Furniture Tops
We Have the Nationally Advertised Paints
You Can Park Right in Front of Our Store
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 67 YEARS

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Sermon by Dr. Abbey: "Part
of A Universal Plan?"
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. Kurt Hanslowe, "Liberalism, Labor, and Re-
ligion," Sunday, July 14, 8:00 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
18:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free.reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School at 10:45 A.M. The Junior and Jun-
ior High Depts. meet in the Douglas Chapel for
service.
Public Worship 10:45. Sermon by Dr. Parr: "Au-
thentic Tidings of Invisible Things."
Student Guild, 5:00 P.M. Meet at the Guild House
for a picnic outing at Bishop Lake.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES
8:00 Holy Communion (with breakfast following
at Canterbury House and discussion led by the
Chaplain).
9:00 Family Communion and Commentary.
11:00 Morning prayer and sermon (Holy Commu-
nion first Sunday of month).
8:00 P.M. Evensong in Chapel of St. Michael and
All Angels.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 Bible Class.
11:00 Church Worship. Sermon by Dr. Loucks.
4:00 Roger Williams Fellowship. Leave the Guild
House for Picnic and Discussion.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
William S. Baker, Campus Minister.
George Laurent, Associate Minister
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 10:30.
Fellowship Hour for Summer Students at 11:30.
Geneva Fellowship picnic with Fireside "Forum
(Methodist), leave Church at 1:15 P.M.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 Morning Worship. Sermon: "Gloom to
Glory."
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service. Dr. Carlton Booth.
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting. 7.37
P.M. is a change in time for the summer
months.
WE WELCOME YOU.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:00 Bible Study, "Jesus and the Old
Testament."
Sunday at 10:00: Worship, sermon by the pastor,
"Christians Grow In Love."
Sunday at 6:00: Lutheran Student Fellowship
(Gamma Delta) Supper and Program, panel
discussion of "Billy Graham's Approach to
Christian Evangelism."
Tuesday, noon till,1:00: Luncheon in Conference
Room No. 2, across hall from Michigan League
Cafeteria.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
.WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
L. C. Utley, Minister,
Television: Sundays, 2:30 P.M., Channel 6, Lan-
sing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M., WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at Forest
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper Meeting-Prof. Paul Kauper'
Speaker.

I

ENROLL NOW

Classes begin Sept. 10
A few weeks or months here can
make a great difference in your
future!
Young men and women who are
trained in business now have a
choice of excellent positions as
accounting and executive assist-
ants, secretaries, etc. Salaries are
the highest ever paid. Qualified
people are promoted quickly.
Business training will make you
self-reliant, bring you higher pay,
give you more interesting co-work-
ers and duties, make your future
safe.

Selected Group Of
SPORTSWEf4R
Reduced For
CLEfiRfiNCE
In- Our
Lower Level Sport Shop
1~~~~rm~u~rII. ~, , ,r 1 . 1

:;,.

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$

4

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
ANN ARBOR

IN

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:00 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon: "0 God,
Our Help in Ages Past."
9:00 A.M. Church School.'
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES

1 .

New Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays, 12:15 P.M.

III t

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