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July 04, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-04

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THE MICHIGAN DATLY

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THURSDAY, JULY 4,1957

IN

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7XAM TIME HECTIC:
Qperators of 'U' Switchboards Keep Busy Schedule
By CARL JORDAN
"University!" says a cheerful F
oice every time you dial 3-1511, '
he campus exchange.
Up to, 4,000 calls are received
aily at the University switch-
oard for the 1700 different cam-
us stations, each with several ex-

I1

FILLS VACANCIES:
Brigham's Chance Trip'
Leads To Recruitment

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ELIGIBLE TO JOIN ? -;
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nights
" "* "Members and Guests
Mary Lou
314 EAST LIBERTY

Connecting these calls-as quick-
ly as possible and giving informa-
tion when available is the job of
the 12 University operators, who,
in eight hour shifts, keep the
board open continuously. ,But in
spite of their busy schedule, the
operators enjoy their work.
'Pleasant Place to Work'
"The Univetsity is a pleasant
place to work," says Mrs. Elsie
Agle, one of the more experienced
operators on the board.
"The Job is interesting. There is
always something new. I will be a
telephone operator as long as I
work."
Mrs. Agle, like most of the op-
erators there, has had years of
experience before working for the
University. For 11 years, she
worked at Michigan Bell, and for
eight more at the Ann-Arbor News
switchboard.
Equal Seniority
Almost all the operators have
equal seniority, but Mrs. Elsa
Schmid has been there the long-
est.
However, one University coed,
Margaret Wiersma, has qualified,
and is working on the switchboard
this summer. Miss Wiersma's
youthful zest is popular with the
rest of the operators, and being
on campus, enables her to answer
many questions about campus af-
fairs.
Hundreds of students every day,
walk directly below the switch-
board, probably without realizing
it.
Has a Lounge
The switchboard room, stream-
lined lounge room with a stove
and refrigerator, and a modern
powder room for the operators is
located directly above the arch in
the West Engine building. Opera-
tors get little chance to lounge,
though, except on their off hours.
The switchboard room is large
enough to meet the expanding
needs of the University. It was
moved last November from the
first floor of West Engine, where
it has been since longer than any
of the operators can remember.
The other operators are: Gladys
Body, Anita Demarco, Zella
Grapp, Beaulah Haynes, Mary
Malott, Ruth Meek, Louise Ran-
kin, Marion Sheldon, Sara Tobey,
Margaret Wadhams, and Donna
Zeeb.
Enjoy Crocheting
Some of the women enjoy cro-
cheting for a hobby.
For the more athletic operators
there is the bowling team, which
this year placed fifth among the
ten University women's bowling
teams. One team member received
a prize for raising her average the
most among all the women bowl-
ers.
"University students ask a lot of
University
Students Get
Scholarships
A total of 4,350 University were
awarded $1,357,433 in scholarships,
fellowships, prizes and student aid
during the 1955-56 fiscal year.
Main source of funds was state
appropriations which accounted
for $483,779 or 35.6 per cent of the
total.
University endowments com-
prised 21.1 per cent.
Other sources of funds were in-
dustrial fellowships, $136,181 or 10
per cent; U.S. Government agen-
cies for general sponsored re-
search, $103,106 or 7.6 per cent;
alumni groups, $80,478 or 6 per
cent; and other miscellaneous gifts
$267,708 or 19.7 per cent.
DAILY1

OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
ial Hospital, Green Bay, Wis., is inter-
ested in employing a man as Chief Lab.
Technologist.
Pan American World Airways, New
York, New York, needs men for a Sales
Training Program for work in the U.S.
Prefer single men.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.

An incidental trip made to
northern Michigan almost two
years ago by Elden L. Brigham,
assistant personnel officer for the
University, lead to a resourceful
recruiting program to fill its cler-
ical vacancies.
He brought back an Evavt, high
school graduate, Carol Toth, now
21 years old, to work in his of-
fice during the summer.
It, occurred to Brigham that
outstate and upper-peninsula
Michigan would be a good source
for augmenting clerical recruit-
ment in the help-scarce local
area. He worked out a plan with
other members of the personnel
office that has met with satisfy-
ing results.
Armed with the personnel of-
fice's standard employment test
blanks, Brigham scours centers in
northern Michigan for budding
typists, stenographers and secre-
taries.
Insthe first of these annual
trips, he interviewed 356 girls,
tested 198, offered jobs to 130.
Eighty girls accepted - a thump-
ing success considering that it
meant leaving home to these Ju-
nior citizens.
Even with normally high turn-
over among women employes,
Brigham reports an unexpected
difficulty in placing this year's

crop of outstate help: 55 of the
original 80 are happily remaining
on their jobs.
Asked about the program, Mar-
jorie Chopp, 17 years old, from
Calumet, was enthusiastic: "It's
wonderful. I like the job, the sal-
ary, and the good feeling college
environment gives you."
Many of the girls who have re-
signed are now University stu-
dents, Brigham reports, fulfilling
his hope that the University's ad-
ministrative arm could serve the
state in a twofold way.
Students Get
Fellowships
New York Community Trust an-
nounced that fellowships totaling
$3,000 at the University's School
of Natural Resources were given
to Charles Steinmetz, Jr. of New
Hartford, Conn.; Wallace D. Bow-
mann of Jacksonville, Ill.; and
Guy J. Lemieux of Quebec, Can.
The late Madame Anna E.
Schoen-Rene established these
grants in the memory of her fa-
ther, Baron von Schoen.
They bring the number of
scholarships to 121.

=-

-Daily-Allan Winder
UNIVERSITY OPERATORS-Mrs. Elsie Agle, one of 12 University Switchboard operators, keeps
busy during the summer connecting calls for the many conferences held at the University. The
University Switchboard offices, home of the famous NO 3-1511, are located in the West Engineering
Bldg., above the Engineering Arch.

~"So clever of me
. to switch to...
OPEN STOCK"
"I never run out of paper or envelopes because my
Eaton Letter Paper is always available. I buy what I
need of paper or envelopes, packaged separately, when I
need them. No embarrassing mis-mated letters for me!"
And you? You'll be delighted with the variety of tints
and textures in Eaton's Open Stock. See them sooni
RI
RAMSAY PRINTERS, Inc.
119 E. LIBERTY -ANN AR OR

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questions, which we try to an-
swer," Mrs. Agle says.
"Some of them are pretty silly.
One of their favorites is, 'Why
doesn't the party answer?' "
"Probably because they're not
there" is sometimes the answer.
Exam Time Busiest
Exam time, and the first few
days of each semester are the
busiest times for the switchboard.
At exam time, some students nev-
er seem to know where their
exams are being held, and they
appeal to the switchboard for as-
sistance. If the operators are not
too busy, they sometimes try to
help.
Then, right after exams, stu-
dents want to know what their
marks are, and try to contact their
professors through the University
switchboard. Of course it is il-
legal for the professors to give
out the marks this way.
Then, as soon as the students
reach campus at the beginning of
a semester; the parents call to
make sure they are all right. If
they don't know the-number, they
try to find out from the Univer-
sity switchboard. Invariably, most
of the calls come Saturday after-
noon and Sunday when Student
Information is closed.
If the operators are too busy
to locate the student, the parents
often "raise the roof," according
to Mrs. Agle, and "want to know
what kind of a University you've
got there?"
Emer'gency Calls
In cases like this, only emer-
gency.calls are putsthrough.
The operators sincerely wish the
students would give parents their
number as soon as possible. When
placing calls on campus, if the
students would use the directory
whenever possible to get the right
extension, the operator's job
would be easier, and they could
make the connection faster.
They don't mind, however, giv-
ing new students, or out-of-town-
ers information such as the loca-

tion of particular campus build-
ings.
During the summer, the many
conferences at the University
keep the operators busy. Calls are
constantly received from persons
who wish to locate participants
in the conference.
Summer Slowest
However, summer is their slow-
est season, and each operator gets
a month vacation.
Up until 1950, the switchboard
was controlled by the Michigan
Bell Company, but then the Uni-
versity took over and now -mploys
the operators..
Calls received at the switch-
board in 1956 totaled 64,156, about
9,000 more than the 54,678 put
through in 1955. The way the calls
Five Awards
Will Be M ade
In October
Five awards for "distinguished
faculty achievement" will be pre-
sented Oct. 7, at University Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher's "State of
the University" address.
The awards, each valued at
$1000, will be presented to five
members of the University facul-
ty to be selected by a committee
appointed by the Senate Advisory
Committee.
The awards mark the second
such presentations donated by the1
Development C o u n c i 1 Alumni
Fund. The first presentations
were made in the spring of 1956.
Assistant to the President Erich
A. Walter said the presentations,
given in conjunction with the
president's address, will create a
"University Community affair.'"
Following this year's address at
Rackham Auditorium, President
and Mrs. Hatcher and the Senate
Advisory Council will receive the
faculty members at a reception in
the League Ballroom.

have-been increasing lately, the
operators expect to receive 80,000
before the end of the year.
Most of the calls they get are
for the engineering research
building at Willow Run, and the
Cooley Building on North Cam-
pus.
The only campus residences on
University line are Fletcher Hail
and Adelia Cheever, both women's
residences.
Hospital Separate
Many calls were formerly from
University Hospital, but now there
is a system whereby the hospital
can dial directly.
Many calls, too, come in daily
from Lansing.
When the operators find a pic-
ture in the paper of a personality
they have been calling a lot, they
put it on their bulletin board, so
they can picture whom they are
talking to.
But in spite of the minor an-
noyances, the operators like their
job.
They are not under the close
supervision that other operators
are, and consequently, there is no
tension of someone looking over
their shoulder.
As Mrs. Agle says, "Each of us
knows our responsibility, and we
do it. We work together on our
job."

p 3

-CAMPUS-
211 S. Staate
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN--
205 E. Liberty
MUSIC SHIOPS O-0
sic S ())PsNO 2-0675
for the Finest in Recorded Music,
Closed at 1:00 P.M. Saturday During July & August

I

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4.

Use this Guide for the Finest in Dining
Over the Holiday Weekend

__ __ i

Organization
Notices
Cercle Francais - weekly meeting.
Tuesday, July 9 in the Michigan League
at 8:00 p.m. A TV film on "The French
Concept of Liberty", followed by dis-
cussion. All welcome.
* * *
Hillel -- Mixer, Sunday, July 7, 7:30
p.m.; at Hillel.,dancing and refresh-
ments - free. Evening services - Fri-
day, July 5, 7:30 p.m., speaker - Mi-
chael Bentwich, "Reflections on the
Story of' Balock."
* * *
Newman Club-Weekly socials, cath-
olic students are invited to weekly so-
cials, featuring dancing, games,Fsing-
fests and free refreshments, Friday
evenings, 8-12 p.m. at Newman Center.

Air Conditioned - Open 11:00 A.M. for Lunches
The Home ofr
FINlE FOOD
P**e tieI dell k7
120 East Liberty
Kitchen open from 11 A.M. to 11:45 P.M.

LEO
PING

For an
Exotic Treat

t

Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
Yos Will be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

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CLOSED lethpq4 JULY 4
CHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
Serving your favorite Beer, Wines and Champagne
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall , Henry Turner, Prop.

I

Closed Monday
LEO PING
I18 West Libertg
Phone NO 2-5624
t

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FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Reductions on dresses
for All Occasions.
Ek
No small and limited sale, this . . . but
a storewide clearance of more than 500
dresses for summer and fall, street
dresses, dresses for afternoon and cock-
tails, for spectator sports and for formal
wear. You'll find a wide choice . . . and
price reductions of 1/4 to 72. Better come
early!

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THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT

4

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ENJOY SMORGASBORD
At Its Very Best!

takes pleasure in announcing
an addition to their menu
of fine foods

I T EtR i20-r M4Ye~R OPP*

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Two Groups of Suits
$14.95 and $18.00

Group Ouster Coats $10.00
Jewelry and Hats at a frac-
tion of their original price.
Specials at our S. U. Shop
Blouses-Skirts-Jackets
Sweaters-Shorts
All Priced for Clearance

10S
'-Na}
''} r-''

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jPIZZA

..
' ,

You can't match these sav-
ings! Dresses originally
priced $14.95 to $39.95.
Sizes 7-15, 10-44, 1212 to
2412, Tall 10-20.

will be served daily
from 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
in our new dining room
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasting pizza in town,"

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