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August 03, 1957 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-08-03

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J.

ES AFTER 30 YEARS:

I;

Prof. Thorpe Cites Love for Teaching, Lite

By FRED KATZ

(

i ' _ 5

d'erat n~rrrnecrfte

MAIO/M THAN $300
$250".299 t"_
,l $200-249
EQ urSS THANx$200

Public School Enrollment
sr
D 1954 '1958 1962 1965

"My first idea of teaching Eng-
lish was a beautiful one, and to
teach it you must have a love for
the literature itself," says Prof.
Clarence D. Thorpe, now on retire-
ment leave after 30 years with
the English department of the
University.
It is evident in conversing with
the emminent scholar, author, and
teacher that his love for both in-
structing and the material he uses
is one of such intensity as to never
be even partially extinguished.
His teaching philosophy is re-
freshing, especially in an age -vhen
so many ottiers in the same pro-
fersion seem so apathetic toward
their work
'Like Teaching'
"You like teaching English be-
cause reading novelists, poets,
Shakespeare and the like mean so
much to the individual and you
want to share what you've found,'
he said.
It is this deep 'and unselfish
desire to give to youth what he
has experienced through his many
fruitful years, that has gained for
him the unanimous respect and
admiration f om all who have
been fortunate to have been under
his tutelage.
He continued. "A good teacher
has a, natural instinct to share
with his students. It's a great
pleasure. Probably the greatest in
the world. And also we're with
youngsters which helps keep us
younger."
'It's a delicate, complex busi-
ness but it isn't all knowledge.-
Spirit and a little "fire of the
Lord" certainly helps.-
The much-believed fallacy that
a professor°s work is pretty soft
and not too strenuous is best dis-
proved by Prof. Thorpe.]
Author of 150 Articles ;
He is the author of over 1509
pamphlets, articles, criticisms, and]
books, and since he is acclaimed
as one of the foremost Keats]

I

ic Schools Enrollment Increases;
of Funds Causes Overcrowding

some college anthologies. His first
book was entitled "Public Speak-
ing Today," and was printed in
1921.
A little-known fact about the
lightly-built professor, and one
which he enjoys telling with a
chuckle, is that he was a 165-lb.
tackle and end on the Ellsworth
College football team where he
did his undergraduate work. And
then in 1917-18 he was head coach
at Flagstaff Normal in Arizona.
Of the gridiron spirt, he quip-
ped, you have a touch with human
kind that you don't get elsewhere,
and it's not always a soft one."
Had Creative Ambitions
Like many teachers of English
literatures, Prof. Thorpe at one
time had ambitions of writing
creatively. Although he has writ-
ten poetry purely for enjoyment,
his hopes of a lucrative career in
that field were courteously shat-
tered by a kindly instructor, with
whom he was particularly friendly.
"He said to me, 'Clarence, I'
think your forte is critical writing
and not creative,' after he had
read samples of the former, and
critical writing is what I've tried
my. hardest at."
An accepted master in his field,
many of Thorpe's former students
and colleagues have been honoring
him in their own volumes, by dedi-
cating them to the professor, What~
greater tribute is there?
His formula for writing critiques
is quite simple. ."In writing criti-
cisms you sort of come on it by
just answering questions no one
else has," he revealed.
Modesty caused him to neglect
to mention that it also helps to
be better than{ anyone else. His
'front page reviews of the New
York Times Book Section will at-
test that he 'has accomplished
both.
String Quartet'
Slatles Concert
Stanley Quartet's final summer
program will be given at 8:30 p.m.,
Tuesday in Rackham Lecture Hall.
The group will play Haydn's
Quartet in D major, Opus 76,.
Number 5; Quartetj in A minor,
Opus 51, Number 2 from Brahms;
and Five Bagatelles for String
Quartet by Chevreuille.

DANCI
TONIG

K >

LITERATURE Ix
... 'a delicate

By TOM, HENSHAW
ated Press Newsfeatures Writer
ope the hard fight will in-
the interest of the citizens
oviding classroom facilities
e children of America."
s Spoke Rep. Samuel Mc-
11 (R-Pa), sounding a hope-
te at the bier of a one-and-
billion dollar federal aid to
ion bill, for which he was
loor leader.
oo1 aid bills have been
in the House in each of the
two congressional sessions,
the fact most people agree
ation's public schools are
overcrowded.
t month an estimated 33%
z youngsters will be trekking
o classrooms with facilities
ed to handle possibly little
,han 30 million.
answer, of course, is more
)oms. But they would cost
tates more than they ca e to
large school of thought eels
ederal government should
e the funds.
accompanying maps and
illustrate graphically the
problem facing the states:
enrollment plus lack of
equals overcrowded class-
F'ast Is Enrollment Rising?'
950, says the U. S. Office of
;ion, there were 25,241,000
enrolled in public schools.
4, the last year in which

-Daily-Ian MacNiven
PROF. CLARENCE D. THORPE
... 'must have a love for literature'

LEAGUE BAL
Paul Brodie's

complete figures are available, the
number had risen to 28,995,000.
The Office of Education esti-
nates mdre than 33% million.
children will be in public schools
this fall and, projecting ahead, it
figures there will be nearly 38
million in 1962 and more than 40
million in 1965.
How Badly Overcrowded Are'
The Schools-
The Office of Education figures
that the 312 million pupils who
attended public schools last year
was about 2%/4 million .or more
than 7per cent above the normal
capacity of facilities.
Alabama was by far the most
overcrowded with more than 8
per' cent of its pupil population in
excess of normal capacity. Wiscon-
sin is the least overcrowded, less
than one half of one per cent.
Where Does The. School Money
Come From?
The community and the state
provide about 92 per cent of funds
used to build and operate schools,
says the Office of. Education. Al-
most all is raised by taxation and
appropriations.
The federal government kicks in
4% per cent, mostly for the school
1 u n ch programs; intermediate
governments, like counties, ac-
count for 3 per cent and the re-
maining one-half of 1 per cent
comes from special fees such as
tuitions and transportation.

How Much Is Spent Per Pupil
On Education?
The Office of Education says
$264.76 was spent annually on each
pupil in average daily attendance
at a public school in the United
States during the academic year.
1963-54, the last in which full
figures are available.
By state, there were wide dif-
ferences in amount, from the $361
spent by New York to the $122
provided in Mississippi.
Do The States Spend Money On
Schools In Relation To Their
Financial Ability?
Generally, yes. New York, with
the highest total personal income;
spends the most on its schools.
Mississippi, with the lowest total
personal income, spends the least.

9-12

scholars in the country, it is only
natural that his greatest amount
of work delves into the mysteries
and fascination of the romantic
poet.
It is indeed a privilege just to
listen to Prof. Thorpe discuss
Keats, for you are immediately,
aware that he knows him more
intimately than probably many of
his 19th century contemporaries.,
"Poets have to have the word
power "magic," but you cannot be1

a poet unless you have the willing-
ness to work. Keats had all this
and his letters prove it conclusive-
ly.
"His aim was not to make his
poems didactic, but to make it
reflective. I've always been at-
tracted to Keats because of his.
realness, and because he was a
poet who believed that poetry
should be a distillation of life," he
added.
'The Mind of Keats'
It was through Thorpe's book,
"The Mind of John Keats," which
was published in 1926, that he
gained prominence. The volume,
under revision at the present time,
was so exceptional that Thorpe
used it as his thesis for his PhD
degree.
In addition to his works on
Keats, Thorpe has written several
high school and college textbooks
on speech, composition, and edited

The Light of Unity .
great that it can illumine
whole world."
-Baha'u'll
BAHA'I
WO RLD FAITI
PUBLIC MEETINI
Tues., Aug. 6, 8:30 I
Baha'i Center
Mr. Lawrence Hautz will
on "Africa As I Have Kn
It."
For further informatic
Contact' Baha'i Cente
1400 Granger NO 8-9

NO DISCRIMINATION:'
U.S. Property Taxes
Study Data Revealed.

Is There A Relationship Between
The Amount of Money Spent On
Each Pupil And The Percentage
' Of Overcrowding?
Broadly speaking, yes. But there
are exceptions.
Washington, for instance, where
the population has been increasing
rapidly, spends $305 on each pupil.
in average daily attendance, a
figure topped by only eight other
states. But Washington's over-
crowding index is 15 per cent, fifth
on that list.
On the other hand, West Vir-
ginia, with a relatively static popu-
lation, is 40th on the spending list
with $186 but it's little more than
4 per cent overcrowded.

EHOLD BARGAINS:
rade-i Purchases Data Cited

(EDITO1'S NOTE: This is the last.
f two articles based on the findings
f an annual consumer finances sur-
ey made by Survey ,Research Centert
Dr the Federal Reserve Board.)
One out of every five Ameri-
ns who buys durable goods for
s -household trades in his old
ashing machine, refrigerator, or
[evision set for a new model.
This was revealed aspart of the

ces conducted by Survey Research
Center for the. Federal Reserve
Board. Findings . are . reported in
the Federal Reserve Bulletin In an
article by Alfred P. Johnson of
FRB.
An estimated 24 million fami-
lies, nearly half of the nation's to-
tal' purchased at least one major-
household good during 1956. New-

ICKHAM GALLERIES:
U' Amateur Art Exhibition
To Host 250 Painters, Viewers

About 250 art lovers and ama-
ur painters are expected to at-
nd the annual Regional Art
Dnference at the University on
ig. 12, and exhibit their works
the Amateur Art Exhibition in
e Rackham galleries.
The show brings together a rep-
sentative group of paintings se-
ted from 'regional shows held
is year in various cities, of the
ate.
Many of the paintings are for
le.'
The purpose for the exhibition
d conference is to "further the
eative development of art
roughout Michigan, survey the
ltural resources in Michigan,
d give recognition to the artis-
tpotentialities of its citizens."
The exhibition will continue
)m Aug. 12 through Aug. 24. and
l present 160 paintings from 59
chigan communities.
rhe one-day; conference on Aug.
will start at 9 a.m. with regis-
Aion.
There will be a general session
10 a.m. with the director of the
iversity Extension Service, E. J
op, making introductory re-

marks, followed by the chairman
of the art department, Robert
Iglehart, and the dean of State-
wide Education, Harold Dorr.
At 2 p.m. demonstrations in oil
painting and watercolors will be
given in Angell Hall, and at 7
p.m., films depicting the works of
such painters as Rembrandt, Van
Gogh, and Leonardo Da Vinci will
be shown in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.l
Organization
Notices
Deutscher Verein: Picnic at Silver
Lake, 2:00 p.m., August. 9. Meet, at
Tappan Hall. All those planning to at-
tend are requested to sign their names
on the list posted in the entrance hall
of Tappan Hall.,
* * *
Graduate Outing Club: Swimming
and supper, 1:00 p.m., Sunday, August
4, Rackham.,
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel: 1511
Washtenaw, Sunday at 6:00, supper
and program with showing of two
moviest dealing with translating the
Bible.'

Two-thirds of the couples mar-
ried less than a year bought at
least one major item, the survey
revealed. Two-fifths of these re-
ported 'net outlays of $500 or
more.
Only one-tenth of those mar-
ried for three and up to 20 years
spent a net amount of $500 or
more for durable goods.
Reflecting recent increases in
the use of consumer credit, al-
most one-half the families covered
reported thehy owed some install-
ment debt as of early this year.
Most - of this was incurred by
purchase of cars and heavier dur-
About one-third of those with
installment debts had outstanding
payments equal to 10 per cent or
less' of their disposabl income..
Another third were obligated from
10 to 19 per cent. Most of the re-
mainder fell between the 20 to 40
per cent level of disposable in-
come.
These proportions were about,
the same as a year earlier.
Average amounts paid for re-
frigerators, washing machines and
furniture rose somewhat in 1*956
over 1955 prices, Johnson said.
The median (the half-way point
of the price range) expenditure
for television sets dropped to a
new low of $225.
for buyers of washing machines
and refrigerators than TV sets.
Average trade-in amount for
washing machines was $50; for
refrigerators, $75; and for TV sets,
$60.

1 University economic researchers
reported recently there -is no evid-
ence of systematic discrimination
against any class of home owner§.
The report was based on a na-
tionwide study of property taxes.
James N. Morgan and E. Scott
Maynes of the University's Survey
Research Center said that while
local inequities may exist in real
estate taxes, 'they appear to be
erratic in nature.
Real estate tax payments vary
directly With- the market value of
homes for the nation.
Average Taxation Rate
Morgan and Maynes found the
average rate of taxation on new
and existing homes in 1953 was
only about one per cent of market
value per year.
To find how your taxes compare
with the national figure, first
estimate the actual market value
of your home, second compute the
total real estate taxes you paid on
your home last year, and third
divide the taxes paid by the market
value. Then multiply the result by
100.
Taxes are lowest in open country,
highest in metropolitan areas and
large cities, and somewhat less in
small cities and towns.
This does not necessarily mean
that people in the open country
are getting a 'better bargain' tax-
wise, for the data has no bearing
on the amount of tax services ren-
dered per tax dollar.
SRC Data
Morgan and Maynes based their
findings on data collected by the
SRC in its annual surveys of con-
sumer finance.
Anderson Sets
TV Hour Talk
Prof. George Anderson, Depart-
ment of Economics, will illustrate
why married couples should talk
over their money problems on the
University's Television Hour, 10
a.m. tomorrow over WWJ-TV.
Prof. Claude Eggertsen, School
of Education will tell in the sec-
odhalf' hour how Benjamin
Franklin championed the cause of
Practical courses for the educa-
tion of useful citizens in a growing
country.

Owner estimates of home values
have been compared by the SRC in
earlier studies and found generally
accurate and reliable.
Morgan and Maynes have com-
pared data from the 1948 and 1953
surveys and found the median ef-
fective tax rate increased about
0.2 per cent over the five-year
interval.
Morgan's and Maynes' findings
are reported in a recent issue of
"The Review of Economics and
Statistics," published by Harvard
University.
1
DEFINITELY YOURS-Fit, support,
definition for A to D cups! White cot.
ton, underwired Whirlpool cups.
AB C, 3.95; D, 5.00.

Come

t Church

Sunday

F'l

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
110 S. State St.
Merril P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Sermon by Dr. Abbey:
"When Life Looks Like a Dead End."
Picnic Outing. Leave Wesley Lounge at 2:00 P.M.
for Westerman Cottage at Strawberry Lake.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
Washtenaw at Berkshiref
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
August 4, 8:00 P.M.: Rev. Lewis A. McGee,
American Humanist Association, "A Religious
Philosophy for an Age of Science."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev.Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School and Nursery, 10:45 A.M.
Junior and Junior High Worship in Douglas Chapel,
10:45 A.M.
Public Worship, 10:45 A.M. Guest Speaker, Prof.
Preston W. Slosson, "'An Honest God Is the
Noblest Work of Man."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and/the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES
8:00 Holy Communion (with breakfast following'
at Canterbury House and discussion led by the
Chaplain).
9:00 Family Communion and Commentary.
11:00 Morning prayer and sermon (Holy Commu-
nion first Sunday of month).
8:00 P.M. Evensong inChapel of St. Michael and
All Angels.

FIRS14 PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
William S. Baker, Campus Minister.
George Laurent, Associate Minister
Rev. Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:00 and 10:34
Dr. Kuizenga preaching.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 Morning Worship. Sermon: "What Mec
Ye By This Service." The Lord's Table.
7:00 Evening Service, "Why Worry."
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M., Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNI'ERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
an~d STUDENT 'CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Chprch--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:00: Bible Study.M'
Sunday at 10:00: Worship Service, "Christiar
Live One Day At A Time."
Sunday at 6:00: Lutheran Student Supper-Prc
gram, with showing of a movie on the histo,
of English Bible translations.
Wednesday at 6:00: Married Couples Steak Fr
at Center. Phone NOrmandy 3-5560 for re
servations.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
L. C. Utley, Minister.
Television:'Sundays, 2:30 P.M., Channel 6, Lpr
sing.:
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M., WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at Forest
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.

8 NICKELS ARCADE
Phone NO 2-2914

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.

Sunday: 10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.

/

216 W. William Street

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Telephone NO 8-8014

t =w ' - -'

KEEP

(rnnT.

I,

I I

1 11111

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 Church School.
11:00 Church Worship.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter 'S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pa
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students

Wp- Ia- ~All lKindlc of ,iaccMirrnrc and kFirniira Tnnc

F

I I I

1L

11

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