100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 13, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

}

401E

TH MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY Y3, 1930

FOUK TIER MICHIGAN I~AILY FIUDAY, JULY IS, 19~

SELL TO ANYBODY':
-Hong Kong's Millions Devoted to Intrigue, Money

Gans, Sayers, Rabinovitch
To Address Educators

CLASSIFIEDS ,

By'LEF LEFKOW
Associated Press Foreign Correspondent
HONG KONG (P)) - The deal-
er in goods from the Communist
mainland leaned back in his chair,
lowered his tumbler of tea, and
smiled.'
"Sure," he laughed, "We sell to
anybody, even a Chiang Kai-shek
Nationalist. We'd like to sell to
you, an American, if you've got
the cash."
His store bulged with Red-made
sewing machines, rainbow-splotch-
ed Chinese silk gowns and in a
corner, a lonely tape recorder en-
cased in glass. "The first one
made on the mainland," he boast-
ed.
This free-wheeling trade talk is
typical of Hong Kong, a couple of
granite peaks jutting starkly from
the China Sea only a few short
miles from the sealed border of
Communist China.,
The British rule the island of
Hong Kong and an "adjoining
chunk of mainland called the New
Territories with a quiet iron hand.
But the loyalty of its people lies
with a pair of twins - intrigue
and money.
Take the Chinese dealer'in Com-
munist merchandise. Most people
who are supposed to know tell
you flatly his store is controlled
Ty the Red regime. Tits purpose is
to provide an outlet for goods and
a source for foreign currency.
Yet the dealer only smiles and
says: "We are a private com-
pany, a few stockholders on the
mainland, yes, but still we are an
independent company."
Intrigue Thick
The intrigue is as thick as the
fog which shrouds Hong Kong's
exclusive Victoria Peak in the
early morning. Rumor trickles in-
to every conversation.
A former Nationalist general on
the outs with Chiang's Formosa
government tells you the Nation-
alist soldiers on Qemoy near the
mainland plan to toss away their
arms and surrender to the Reds.
Another former general - a
one-time Red on the skids -- says
the Communists plan to invade
Formosa and' follow with a blow
against Hong Kong.
Cut away the rumor and propa-1
ganda and most people here agree
on one thing: The Communists
want Hong Kong Just as itis - a
a dot of the Free World on the
edge of the Red fastness.,
One American diplomat puts it
this way: Red China, he says, is
like a hungry man with one skin-
nly chicken. He can eatt, but he'll
itill be hungry and he won't get
any more eggs.
Chinese Scientist
Faces Deportation
SOUTH BEND, Ind. ()--The
Chicago regional office of the U.S.
Immigration Service had in its
hands yesterday the question of
whether to deport Dr. Hao-Sung
Tan, University of Notre Dame
scientist.
Stephen Jurco of Chicago, Tan's
attorney, said the scientist's de-
portation to Communist China was
postponed by the Board of Immi-
gration Appeals.
The government has charged
Tan, an aerodynamics expert, with
failing to register annually as an
alen before coming to Notre Dame
two years ago.
He has been in the United States
since 1946 ,and has announced his
intention to become a citizen if not
deported.

X01'''Pr tea r. "'-
S, lnrif ,, - ,. "« 1
Shnhl. t / lal1~
C : 0MGz
WingV
Cantn+ ;_. t '' F : arxroem C
/'O 'i ^s S' tl' " r ' ' f14 , , E gc 'F-akq+s
G ; 11"«1P~lI
1 -
3~~ l(AL~O~~
CAP o ~ tt l dai i icz
i l~fPit,
- ... AP Newsfatures

Approximately 1,000 educators
from Michigan schools and nearby
states will attend the 27th annual
Summer Education Conference at
the University Tuesday through
Thursday.
Keynoting the theme. "Reading
from Beginning to Maturity," the
three-day event will provide a
series of lectures,' supplemented
by special interest groups and ex-
hibits.
Sponsored by the School of Ed-
ucation, all meetings will be pub-
lic. Each day of the conference
will be highlighted by a lecture
at the morning's General Ses-'
sion meeting.
Tuesday's highlight will be a
Hillel Marks
Religious Days
Religious' services at Hilel Foun-
dation are being resumed at 8 p.m.
today, according to Herman Ja-
cobs, director of the Foundation.
Student conducted, the services
will be followed by a Kiddush and
Oneg Shabbat.
Historical Tisha B'av will be
observed with a special celebration
at 8 p.m. Monday at Hillel, 1429
Hill St. Tisha, B'av, the Ninth of
Ab, is observed as a fast day as
a mark of respect in traditional
destruction of the Temple in Jer-
usalem.
At the Foundation, recognition
will be given to the traditional
observance which centers about
the reading of the Biblical book,
"Lamentations." In addition there
will be a discussion of the day's
contemporary significance in light
of the recent resestablishment of
the State of Israel.
A summer series of sessions in
Israeli folk dancing will start at
7 p.m. Sunday at the Foundation.
Israeli and American students will
participate and Dave Sirota, Grad.,
will lead the group. Instructions
will be given for those who do not
know the dances.
Jacobs announced that every-
body is welcome to all t h e s e
events.

talk, at 10 a. m. in Schorling Au-
ditorium, "The Importance of
Wholesome Child Life" by Roma
Gans, professor of Education,
Teachers' College, Columbia Uni-
,versity.
Highlight of Wednesday's 9 a.m.
General Session in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium will be an ad-
dress, "Children Do Read," by
Mrs. Frances C. Sayers, author of
children's books, library consult-
ant, lecturer, and formerly direct-
or of Children's Work, New York
City Public Library.
At 12 noon there will be a pic-
nic on the Mall between the
School of Education and the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design.
Keynote speaker for Thursday's
General Session at 11 a. m. in
the Architecture Auditorium will
be Dr. Ralph Rabinovitch, direc-
tor, Hawthorne Center, Depart-
ment of Mental Health, Northville,
who will discuss "Psychiatric Con-
siderations in Reading Retarda-
tion".
Square Dances
Two-square dances will be held
at The University July 17 and Au-
gust 7, sponsored by the Office of
the Summer Session and the De-
partments of Physical Education

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3. P.M. doily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
1951 Studebaker, inexpensive transpor-
tation, Radio and heater. $90. NO-5-]
4361. )B
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-~3-rooms, Kit-
clien, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished. 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $2,500 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
1947 DESOTO -- Four-door. $50. Good
running condition. Needs minor brake
adjustment. NO-3-6347. )B
HOME in southeast section. 4 large
bedrooms, living room, dining room,
and breakfast room. Fine basement
with recreation room. Abundance of
closet and storage space, gas-heater.
Attached garage. Drapes and carpet-
Ing included. Priced at $27,900, with
liberal terms. Call NO-3-0123 or NO-
3-4300. )B
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND world War Veteran wants per-
manent night janitor work. Reliable.
NO-2-9020. )S
HELP WANTED

BUSINESS SERVICES
GRADUATE EXCHANGE STUDENT,
from Paris studying linguistics. Wish-
es to tutor French. Call NO-2-1416. )J
wASHINGS. finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-1&
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Glasses In red straw case, near
E. Med. Phone Porter, NO 3-4205. )A
LOST-Diamond ring in Virginian Res-
taurant. Sentimental value. Reward.
Phone NO-2-0379,.)A
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156. )°
FOR RENT
VERY NICE 3-ROOM--furnished Apart- )
ment available for immediate rental
to couple. Near Campus and Hospital.
NO 3-8126. )0
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
for two. Call NO 8-7230. )C

oa .ioga KQ& Trade
Z$0 S rce 1950
1300 Combined annualvalue
of exports and ;mparls
.200 rn[US" dollars
2000 _____
.00
2950 2951 2952 2953 2954 29..

Bong Ko'ng - Trade importance
In RelatiOn to &oleedNaions
g.sng . KW
Ce:::::" g||l55Im~porks

Svan ji::i:

for Men and Women.
The square and couple
will be given from 8:30
p. m. at the Palmer Field
Courts, or in Waterman
nasium in case of rain.

dances
to 10
Tennis
Gym-

(..ntia OSa O 0011 A/

100 200 300 400

s0

600

iU

Hong Kong itself would be of
little strategic value to the Reds.
Its main value lies as an outlet for
Communist trade, and possibly
even more important, as a source
bf foreign exchange.
The richer of Hong Kong's 2% V
million residents, 99 per cent
Chinese, are so c o n f i d e n t the
island will remain free of trouble
they're making long-term invest-
ments here. Hong Kong and its
twin city across the bay, Kowloon,
are undergoing face Ii f t i n g s.
Apartment houses, some 20 stories
high, are rising. New stores open
almost daily. The runways of Kow-
loon's busy Kai Tak Airport are
being enlarged to make way for
mnore and bigger planes. Freighters
ride low in the choppy bay, their
holds bulging with outgoing and
incoming cargoes.
City Appears Prosperous
The city appears prosperous, yet
behind the deafening roar of con-
struction pile drivers and bustling
business are thousands of Chinese
refugees without work and old-
line British traders cut off from
their major market.
Ever since its birthday 100 years
ago, Hong Kong's main business
has been trade with China and its
500 million people. But war in
Korea halted the lush trade.
In 1950, after the Communist
North Koreans invaded the south,
the United States and its allies
slapped an embargo on strategic
trade with Red China which still
in force. Britain is pressing for
a relaxation of the restrictions,
but Washington has taken the at-
titude it won't allow trade until
the Reds start acting like they
want peace.
The embargo has hit Hong Kong
hard. Exports to the mainland
this past year were one-eighth of
what -they were before the war
began. The bulk of the trade now

consists of fertilizers, dyes and
medicines.
With its main market cut ,off,
many thought Hong Kong would
become a ghost town off the rocky
mainland. Instead its residents,
prodded by the British, turned toj
manufacturing. Today, there are
some 3,000 factories in the col-
ony with products ranging from
hatpins to ferryboats. In a few
short' years, the "made in Hong
Kong" label, something that might
have been thought a fraud a few
years back, has flooded world
markets.
Refugees Triple Population,
Desipte this economic v i g o r,
Hong Kong has slums that rank
with the worst in the world. One
of the reasons is that while the
Reds were swallowing up the
mainland, upwards of two million
Chinese poured across the border
into Hong Kong, tripling the
normal population.
With the refugees came a politi-
cal problem. Both the Nationalists
and Communists want their mor-

al and financial support. The
problem of coping with this men-
tal tug-of-war war rests with the
British.
The British policy is to steer a
neutral course and ship trouble
no matter which side starts it.
British police have a file on both
Nationalist and -Red agitators..
Many Chinese here have sad
memories of life under both the
Communists and Chiang. One, a
minor official in Hong Kong's
civil government, tells this story:
"I have a son in a Communist
prison under a death sentence be-
cause he has not 'reformed' and
become a good Communist. I dis-
like the Communists. .,."
"I also have lived under the
Nationalists before the Commun-
ists took over. Their government
was too corrupt to succeed. They
were no better."
Nearing 65, he is like most of
Hong Kong's C h i n e s e. Their
hearts long for the nation of their
birth, but their stomachs and
heads tell thein to stay here.

Ann Arbor
Former's Market
Detroit St. between Catherine and
North 5th Ave.
Farm fresh produce atoall times
direct from producer to consumer.
OPEN EVERY MONDAY
EVENING FROM 5 TO 9
Wednesday and Saturday
from 7:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

I

SECRETARY-To assist in psychologi-
cal work in Detroit. $70 a week. Typ- Read and Use
ing required. Some college experience
essential. Call NO 2-5742 evenings.> l s e
at the
DEL RIORETAURAN
122 West ashington at Ashley
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
BEER and WINE served
Hours: 11 A.M.-12 P.M. (Closed Tues.)
Phone NO 2-9575

U

101 YEARS AGO the Lewis & Clark expedition
wintered at Fort Mandan, North Dakota. They
were cold, but this is a hot offer. Clip this ad,
it's worth ic in trade, today only.
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

RUBE GOLDBERG won the Pulitzer Prize for Car-
toOning just 8 years ago. In celebration just clip
& bring in this ad. Worth 1 c in trade, today only.
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

50c

1956
SUMMER

50c

r

JOHN PAUL JONES ...
was admitted to the U.S. Hall of Fame just 31
years ago. To commemorate, this ad is worth 1 c
in trade, today only
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

o '?

11

{1

1I

-CAMPUS--
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
--DOWNTOWN
music Mops NO 2.0675
tor the Finest in Recorded Music
Saturday Summer hours (July-Aug.)-9:30-1 :00 P.M.

r

11,

-"- .
f

ON FOREST
between S. University and
Waishtenow.
Parking at rear of shop.
Brings you
"SPECIAL EDITION"
ADVERTISED
IN VOGUE
A Muted Plaid in silk-and-
cotton . . . softly draped
neckline, high front, low
back. Contour patent belt.
Black with red, black with
cognac. Sizes 8 to 18 ..,
$1745

.fl~ rE PN CF
the most popular
oriental eating place in town

8:00

ON
fl.M.

SALE

- 5:00

P.M.
T

11M _A

r - u m - - u

, _ i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan