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July 11, 1956 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-11

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T" THIC"16AN IiAILV

WEDNSDJAY,, JULY 11, 1956

----,.

4RLEZ-YOUS FRANCAIS?
Language House Facilitates Learning
byHARRIETRICHEY |||j|

Have you ever desperately
wanted some gravy on your meat
and potatoes but struggled through
a meal without it because you
didn't know how to ask for it in
Prench? ,
Situations like this arise every
day for the ten girls who are living
at the language house on Baldwin
Avenue. These girls .are trying to
master French or Spanish and live
together in a world where English
is 'shocking' to the ear.
English, allowed only when
"people from the outside" call on
the telephone and don't realize
that they should converse in
French or Spanish with their
friends in the language house.
Problems Arise
Problems arise, however, when
a girl who can speak only French
wants to communicate with a
friend who can speak only Span-
ish. Both must then break down
and speak English.
These ten girls live under the
direction of Senorita Yolanda Fu-
entes from Arequipa, Peru, and
Mlle. Francoise Mazet from Paris,
France.
Senorita Fuentes is in the Unit-
ed States for the first time this
summer. She plans to teach Eng-
lish when she returns to Peru.
While here at the University she
is teaching a Spanish course call-
ed "Life in Spanish America".
Taught at Wooster
Mlle. Mazet has been teaching
at Wooster College in Ohio since
she left Paris two years ago. She
teaches a conversation course in
French at the University this sum-
mer.
Senorita Fuentes and Mlle. Ma-
zet both believe that in guiding
these girls they at the same time
learning a great deal about how
Americans live - though t h e y
would rather the girls did not rea-
lize this.

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Sees Relief
For Aiders
LOf Relatives
Increasing urbanization a n d
isappearance of large family
omesteads are signs that society
nay eventually have to relieve
elatives entirely of their obliga-
ion to support adult dependents,
according to an article in the cur-
ent issue 'of The Michigan Law
Review.
Prof. Daniel R. Mandelker of the
ndiana University law school
notes that legal concepts regard-
ing the duty of a family to sup-
port relatives in distress are large-
y undefined and "may have fal-
en in disuse in some communi-
ies."
At present, .he continued, the'
egal teeth of family responsibility
aws stem directly from a desire
to cut relief rolls wherever close
relatives can be required to pro-
vide assistance.
Demand for such financial sup-
port may well create financial and
emotional problems for all con-
cerned, however. "If a child has
not developed a sense of security
and has a need for acceptance by
the family group, he may be over-
generous in meeting this demand,"
Prof. Mandelker commented.
"But the child who has separat-
ed himself from his family with
difficulty will resent the financial
and personal ties that the law
compels and will exaggerate the
reasons why he cannot afford to
give this support," he said.

By ADELAIDE WILEY
Instead of pink net formals,!
red crepe paper strips and Paul
Brodie's band, the Union's big
ballroom was filled with laughter,
and walking canes yesterday after-
noon.
"We're both just Lansing bums,
aren't we, honey?" said a Lansing
lady, and her white-hatted com-
panion giggled in appreciation.
adding to the general congenial
atmosphere.
It was the ninth annual confer-
ence on aging. "Health for the
Aging" and the Senior Citizen's
Guild was meeting, with a panel
of gerontologists using the speak-
ers from which "Dancing in the
Dark" usually bursts.
Member Reads Question
A panel member read off a
question: "In a diabetic case what
does a doctor mean when he says
sugar has taken control?" He
pointed to Dr. Frederick C. Swartz,
head of Lansing's Rehabilitation
Center, who picked up a canary
yellow dunce's cap, and said, "I
wish I knew that answer"-laugh-
ter.

LANGUAGE HOUSE-House on Baldwin Avenue enables Spanish
and French students to practice their languages.

Both graduates and undergradu-
ates live in the house. Several girls
are members of the glass of 1957
and are majoring in either French
or Spanish. Others are working to-
wards their Doctorate or Master's
degrees.
One or two are already teaching
Science Group
To Hear Talk
"Molecular Basis of Genetic
Recombination" will be the topic
of the third in a series of lectures
sponsoresd by the Biophysics Re-
search Center to be given at 9 a.m.
today in Auditorium C, Angell
Hall.
The lectures are part of a Sum-
mer Symposium on Biophysics
which is dealing with molecular
structure and biological function.

CONFERENCE ON AGED:
Gay Atmosphere Prevails

THE FIRST recorded observation of the transit
of Venus was in 1631. Join us in celebrating the
325th anniversary of this event by clipping this
coupon. Bring it in, 'tis worth 1 c in trade, today
only.
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

a foreign language in an elemen-
tary or secondary school.
Permits Free Expression c
The girls enjoy the languagea
house because it gives them ac
chance to express themselves free- r
ly and naturally. Mistakes are
laughed about, but rarely does a
girl repeat an error. Hearing a
language every day, they believe,
is far more helpful than years of
reading and vocabulary practice.
Words are picked up easily and
not forgotten as soon as those
crammed the night before an
exam.
Occasionally the group eats out
in Ann Arbor restaurants. Ob-
servers often stare at them since
they continue to converse in
French and Spanish.
Increases Ability
Everyone agrees that spontan-
eous evening parties lull of Span-
ish dancing and French and Span-
ish party records have greatly in-
creased language facility; although
chatting around the ironing board
is probably even more rewarding.
One student claims she expects
to start saying her prayers in
French any day.
Curiously enough, students es-
pecially enjoy entertaining Ro-
mance Language faculty members
at dinner. Professors C. N. Stau-
bach, Sanchez Escribano, Julio del
Toro, Louis ''ennenbaum and
James O'Neill as well as Emile de
Sauze of Cleveland have already
visited the house.
The girls hope that some day
the Language House will become a
permanent campus establishment,
since it has already greatly in-
creased their language abilities.
Linguistics Speech
Seymore Chatham of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania will speak
at 7:30 p. m. tomorrow on "Lin-
guistics and Politics" before the
Linguistic Forum.
The Linguistic Forum is spon-
sored by the Summer Session Lin-
guistics Institute and is held ev-
ery Tuesday and Thursday even-
ing in Rackham Amphitheater.
The meetings of the Forum are op-
en to the general public without
charge.

(Continued from Page 2)
Marion, Ohio-Teacher needs: High
School Home Economics; Junior High
vocal Music; Arts and Crafts; English/
Latin.
Maumee, Ohio-Teacher needs: Girls'
Physical Education, High School/Ele-
mentary; Public Speaking/English;
Speech/Hearing Therapist; Elementary
(5th Grade).t
South San Francisco, Calif.-Teacher#
needs: Vocal Music/one other subject;
Basic English; General Science; Indus-
trial Arts; Elementary (1st to 8th).
Stockton, III.-Teacher needs: Home
Economics: Speech Correctionist; Math;
English/Dramatics; Science (Gen. Sci-
ence or Biology); Library; Girls' Physi-
cal Education.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-'
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
City of New York, Dept. of Personnel,
announces an exam for Jr. Planner-
requiring a B.S. degree in City Planning,
Engrg., Arch., Landscape Arch., Public
Admin., Econ., Soc., Statistics, Geogra-
phy, Law, or equivalent and one year of,
experience or a year of graduate study
towards an M.A. in City Planning. Ap-
plications must be in by July 16 1956.
There is also an exam for Assistant
Civil Engineer. Applicants filing by
Nov. 6, 1956 may take the exam Jan.
26. 1957.
Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati,
Ohio, has an opening in the Tax Divi-
sion for a young man with a strong
interest in corporation tax. Requires
a man with a degree in Commerce and!
or Law with some background in Acctg.
Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., Cleveland,
Ohio, needs a man with a degree in
Elect. E. or Mech. Elect. to work as
Sales Engineer.
Allen Studio (Photography Studio)
Detroit, Mich., has an opening for a
Salesman.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

But Dr. Swartz went on to ex-
plain to the large crowd of elderly
people that the phrase could mean
there was too much sugar in a
patient's blood, but it would be up
to individual doctors to give an
expert explanation of what was
meant.
The Senior Citizens members
listened attentively to answers and,
periodically, someone would write
a question down, handing it to Dr.
Woodrow W. Hunter-Division of
Gerontology, Institute of Human
Adjustment, at the University -
who was happily collecting the
questions on bits of paper and
handing them to panelists.
Ladies wore straw hats and cool
print dresses. One. hat, red, was
covered with sparkling rhinestones,
topped with a red velvet rose -
someone said "We're all out in our
Sunday best. What do you think
of that lady with dyed hair?"
Man Adjusts Tie
A tanned, courtly old gentleman'
adjusted his polka-dotted bow tie
as another question shot out, "How
come three people with different
ailments get the same pills?"
Other interrogations were put
to the doctor-panelists and the
lively meeting ended with more
punch served for "anyone who
wants to imbibe."
Mrs. Grace Leedley (who said
to this reporter, "I'm eighty-two-
oh, are you going to put that in?
Wel, it's all right") is on the fi-
nance committee for Lansing's Big
Brother Club.
"We have fifty-five men who
each take young boys under their
wings. These boys are on the roaC
to juvenile delinquency, you know
and the Club helps them a lot
Seventeen are on our waiting lis
for big brothers."
Happily, people filed out of the
ballroom, some even clad in saddli
shoes.
"That crazy old nut," a lady
smiled, "he got one of the retire-
ment pamphlets I wanted" (refer
ring to a man from Grand Rapids)
Dr. Schwartb walked out, sport
ing a rose bud in his lapel, fitting
for the air of conference gaiety
We asked Dr. Swartz what he

old, start in getting wrinkled skin,
white haid, hardening of the arter-
ies and all that, it doesn't mean!
that it's a natural thing.
"I have a theory differing from
what most people believe about old
age-I call what happens to you
after 40 or 50, the 'product of the
impact of environment.'1"
'All Good Things'
As an example, Dr. Schawrtz
cited an experiment in which a cat
was placed on a table with "all
the good things a eat might want
around him."
The cat was quite satisfied, Dr.
Swartz said, until the experimenter
introduced a dog in the room, at
15-minute intervals.
"Then his hypothalmus." the
gerontologist patted the top of his
head, "began to react, and so did
his pituitary gland. This went on
all the way down to his adrenal
glands, until he had what I call an
overdose of glandular extracts."
This dog did not come near the
cat, but soon the cat showed "all
the signs of what is know as old
age," and he might have had white
hair by the end of a week, Dr.
Swartz said, if he had been human.
Not Like Old Days
"In the old days," Dr. Swartz
frowned, "every time a lion or
tiger came near you, you would
use up all these glandular extracts
in fighting back at him.
"But now, there are no lions or
tigers, you have no way of letting
off steam ,and you hold all the
fight in you. So you fret and fuihne
inside when you have a harrowing
experience, and you hair is liable
to turn white overnight."
Asked why, "in the old days,"
humans had shorter life expect-
ancy, Dr. Swartz remarked, "The
tigers ate you up."
Dr. Swartz said that too many
gerontologists subscribe to the
belief that old age is result of only
the passage of time: a negative
belief.
'Enjoy Your Stress'
Emphasizing that by 1980 there
will be 25 million retired people in
the United States, Dr. Swartz
said, "This means one elderly per-
son for every working person to
support in the country."
If it could be done, he added, he

would get all the University stu-
dents up in the ballroom, and start
changing their ideas about old age
so they would not approach it with!
the old attitude.
Dr. Swartz said he thought each'
day should be thought of as a new,
challenge, not a worry.
"Perhaps the best solution I can
give to 'old age' is summed up in
Hans Selye's book, in which he
says, 'Enjoy your stress.'
"I think all young people have
potential to live 120 years. 'Enjoy
your stress'-this Is the way to
live."
Museum Display
An exhibition, "Weaving from
the Looms of Ancient Egypt," is
currently on display in the Kelsey
Museum of Archaeology at the
University.
Outstanding in the exhibition is
a burial shroud of cotton cloth
embroidered with silk and silver
thread which displays crosses in
many variations in its design. A
row of peacocks, early Christian
symbols of immortality, decorate
the neck border.
Dating perhaps from the 14th
century, this is from the ceme-
tery near the monastery Deir-Al-
Idham, "Monastery of the Bones,"
near Asiout, middle Egypt.

r--^,^

H ENRY H.
S'TEVENS," lInc*

.1

State Flora
Book Subject
Of Botanists
University botanists will begin
work this fall on Michigan's first
complete current handbook on loc-
al flora in more than 50 years.
Research and publication of the,
book will take five years and cost
an estimated $60,000. Results are
anticipated to fulfill needs of the:
state's flower and gardening en-
thusiasts, as well as professional
botanists.
Scheduled for publication in
1961, the book is expected to run
400 to 500 pages with easily un-
derstandable descriptions of all
known varieties of Michigan flora
and line drawings of the more im-
-portant plant species.
"Every attempt will be made to
prepare a book attractive and use-
ful to laymen," Prof. Kenneth L.
Jones, of the botany department.
Principal investigator for the
project will be Edward G. Voss of
Ann Arbor. Much of his work will
be centered in the University's
Herbarium's extensive plant col-
lection.

*1-

1273 Broadway Bill
Flint 6, Michigan Stevens
e 'Lit. '+40
Phone Flint Manager
Collect CEdar 4-1686
For L~ower
Interstate Rates.
We own, operate, schedule and despatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

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Y

Sensational

S-

I

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J4

SALE

RUBE GOLDBERG won the Pulitzer Prize for car-
tooning just 8 years ago. In celebration just clip
& bring in this ad. Worth 1 c in trade, today only.
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Nob Marshall has the bargains.

SPRING & SUMMER
500 PAIR WOMEN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S SHOES INCLUDED
BUY 2 PAIR FOR PRACTICALLY THE COST OF 1 -OR BRING
A FRIEND AND SHARE THE SAVINGS! THESE SHOES ARE FROM
OUR PRESENT FALL STOCK!

,

1

thought of the conference so far.
Replying that he thought it was
good fun besides being profitable
work, Dr. Swartz added, "I think
there's somewhat of a wrong ap-
proach in there too."
He commented, "When you get

101 YEARS AGO the Lewis & Clark expedition
wintered at Fort Mandan, North Dakota. They
were cold, but this is a hot offer. Clip this ad,
it's worth 1 c in trade, today only.
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

11

JULY
CLIIEf R INCE

SAMPLE SHOES
4B and 4/2B,
$349

11

Washable Canvas
PLAY SHOES
$29

III

COLORS:
White
Beige
Pastels
o Black
Navy

TO CELEBRATE the anniversary of the

1955

Remaining Summer

Rubberband Duckpin Bowling Championship
(won by the Harmony Dairy of Pittsburgh) this
ad is worth 1c in trade, today only
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOPt
Bob Marshall has the bargains

COATS

i

Summer

Full Length and Shorties
Were to $29.95

1/2 Price
NowX10

STYLES:
Operas
Halters
Slings
Ba rebacks
High & Low Heels
Wedges
Flats

A Pair
WHEN YOU
BUY A PAIR
AT REGULAR
PRICE!

'

SUITS

III

I

JOHN PAUL JONES .. .

was admitted to the U.S. Hall of Fame just 31
years ago. To commemorate, this ad is worth I c
in trade, today only
BOB MARSHALl'S BOOK SHOP
Bob Marshall has the bargains

Group of
DRESSES

Street - Afternoon - Cocktail - Formal - Knits

500 PAIRS from regular stock-all nationally advertised shoes. Values to
$16.95, when you buy one pair. at regular price you choose another shoe
at same price or lower FOR ONLY $1. Both shoes must be from special sale
group!
ALL SALES FINAL-NO EXCHANGES
iA

$10.00

$15.00

$25.00

Were to $45.00
cf, . * r^.__. . L D TT-r r *% DCCCCC'r'r A 1.. l- D 'r)lrr' 1

11

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