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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 26, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE lICIIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 26,

CLASSIEFIEDS

ROOM AND BOARD
WOMEN STUDENTS - small co-op
house; Inexpensive, friendly, com-
fortable. Friends Center, 1416 Hill
Street, phone Dorothy Gross, NO
8-8802 E
ROOMS FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR summer to share
with 1 or 2 men. 625 Forest NO 3-3433.
D
ROOMS FOR rent-ment. 723 Oakland $
block from campus. Singles - $7.00
Doubles - $12.00. Call NO 3-3792 after
5:30. D
LARGE PLEASANTLY furnished house
close to campus. Singles, doubles,
and triples. Kitchen priviledges and
use of specious living room, study on
first floors. $5, per week. Call NO
3-1511 extension 2858 or NO 3-8274. D
2 SINGLE ROOMS and bath for faculty
or graduate student. Call NO 8-7605.
D

FOR RENT
SUMMER APARTMENT-campus loca-
tion pleasant. To share with one or
two men. Phone NO 3-3478 after 6
P.M. C
TWO ROOM apartment, furnished, new
cleanl. Private entrance. Between Ypsi.
and Ann Arbor. $67.50 per month.
Phone NO 2-9020. C
BOARD
GOOD HOME cooked food, carefully
prepared, by the week. Rebates. 1319
Hill, Howard Wentz, NO 2-6422. 8
DO YOU need a place to eat this sum-
mer? We feature meals Monday thru
Friday new cook. Alpha Chi Sigma
1319 Cambridge. Call NO 2-8312, and
ask for house manager. 8
FRATERNITY NOW serving meals. Only
one block from campus. For reserva-
tions call Dick or Don afternoons or
evenings at NO 2-8581. S

BUSINESS SERVICES
TEACHER OF SINGING-Mtrs. Kenneth
Westerman. Member of The National
Association of Teachers of Singing
715 Granger. NO 8-6584. J
PERSONAL
WOULD LIKE to form or join Car Pool
between Ann Arbor-Dearborn. Phone
NO 3-1151 Ext. 2857. F
ALL SUMMER school students regard-
less of whether they were principals,
teachers, secretaries, or T.V. actors
during the year are entitled to special
discounts of 40-50% to such leading
magazines as Time, Life Newsweek,
etc. This results in per copy prices of
6-8c which places the publications in
the newspaper cost range. Additional
information may be had or orders
may be placed by phoning Student
Periodical Agency, NO 2-3061, days,
or evenings. Credit is extended until
the subscription commences. F
FOR SALE
HIDE-A-BED like new $60. Call NO
3-6137,12to1or5to7. B

GEN. TWINING:
Rinssians Take U.S., British on Tour

MOSCOW (MP) - Top American
and British air generals took a
jeep tour of Russia's tightly
guarded Kubinka Air Base yes-
terday and were shown a new
twin-engine bomber which they
were told could fly faster than
sound' TheUnited States Air

}S
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1
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Hospital
Releases

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STATE "111

Department of Speech Presents
1956 SUMMER PLAYBILL
Bolton's Drama
ANASTASIA
July 4, 5, 6 &67
Maugham's Comedy
THE CIRCLE
July 11, 12, 13 &r14
Carroll's Fantasy
THE WAYWARD SAINT
July 25, 26, 27 &r 28
Fry's Comedy
THE LADY'S NOT
FOR BURNING
August 1, 2, 3 & 4

Dial NO 2-3136

PACKS ALL THE
WALLOP OF
"BLACKBOARD JUNGLE!"
"Like a Brass-Knuckled
Uppercut."... Newsweek
THE STORY OF TIlE ROCK
AND ROL GENERATION I

,,,,.
3 !
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'.',qJAMES *Ad -.. iJOHN
: An ALLIE ARTISTS Picture

Soon
DISNEY'S
" GREAT LOCOMOTIVE
CHASE"

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IBernak~y
By MARY ANN THOMAS V
Lone survivor of the May 18t
two-car collision in which threet
University students were killed,'
Thomas F. Bernaky, '56, was re-
leased from University Hospital1
yesterday with "full recovery" ex-l
pected.-
Bernaky was entered into the
hospital with a "possible 50-50
chance" of recovering from mul-
tiple injuries and severe head in-
juries. Yesterday hospital off i-
cials reported he "has recovered tok
the extent that he is capable of
going home."
No Question
"There is no question about full
recovery," officials reported.
The accident, which also killed
a Detroit couple, Howard and
Lena Saltzer who were in the
second car, occurred six miles east
of Ann Arbor on U.S. 12. Students
killed were Keith B. Ryan, '58E,
William B. McKean, Jr., '58E, and
Nancy M. Robson, '59.
The four students were dressed
in formal clothes and reportedly
headed toward the Farm Cupboard.
for a Phi Sigma Kappa dinner.
The scene of the accident, how-,
ever, was beyond the restaurant.
Car Demolished
Completely demolished, Ryan's
car was found on the left side of
the road and witnesses reported it
was being driven recklessly prior
to the accident.
Although no signssof drinking
were found at the scene of the
accident, later investigation dis-
closed that the students had at-
tended a cocktail party held before
the dinner.
Bernaky was taken to his home
in East Cleveland, Ohio, by his
mother who met him at the hos-
pital.
Plan Willow
Run ace-lift'
Willow Run Air Terminal will
uitdoergo a complete "face-lifting"
according to the Airlines National
Terminal Service Co.
Changes will include the instal-
lation of complete air-cooling for
the entire Willow Run Terminal, a
"self -claim" system of° handling
baggage and a special type of seat-
ing.
The decisio\1 to remodel the air-
port followiing the Airport Use
Panel's recommendation that Wil-
low Run be converted for military
use with the commercial airlines
transferring to Wayne-Major Air-
port indicates that the airlines are
going to "stay put."
Owned and leased by the Univer-
sity, the airport will undergo the
$500,000 remodeling and renova-
tion under the direction of archi-
tect Minoru Yamasaki.
Yamasaki, 44-year-old Detroiter,
won a first place honor award
from the 11,000 membership Amer-
ican Institute of Architects for his
new concrete and glass terminal
building at the St. Louis Municipal
Airport.
The work is being carried out
and paid for entirely by the air-
lines operating company ANTSCO,
according to its president, Robert
E. Miller, with no tax money or
public funds involved.

Puccini's Opera
LA BOHEME
With the School of Music
English Translation by Josef Blatt

Force does not yet have a super-
sonic bomber.
Gen. Nathan Twining, U.S. Air
Force chief of staff, seven of his
aides and a party of British,
French and other foreign military
men invited to the U.S.S.R. to see;
its latest aviation achievements,
traveled in a motorcade to the
base 40 miles outside Moscow.
A party of American newsmen
who tried to trail along were
turned back by Russian officers
20 miles outside Moscow.
'Childs Guide'
The British guests told reporters
later their tour was "a child's
guide to the Soviet air force."
"When we asked the range of
planes we were shown we were
told it was very great," the Bri-
tons said. "When we asked about
the speed of a ceretain plane we
were told very great. Nevertheless
it was a valuable closeup."
Gen. Twining said the new
bomber they were shown was a
light attack bomber probably a bit
smaller than Britain's faster-than-
sound jet bomber, the B57 Can-
berra.
However, British viewers thought
it was a bit bigger. The Soviet
bomber had never been shown be-
fore, the visitors were told.
Leisurely Pace
They drove around the base in
jeeps at a leisurely pace examin-

- ' tr lcOderntioolnk -*
Due to remodeling. . .
No matinees-Mon. to Fri.
Evenings 7:00 & 9:00 only!
THE GREAT LOVE STORY
OF THE GREAT WAR!

Hoover Site
To Be Location
Of Plant Dept.
(Continued from Page 1)
Chairman of the Chamber's in-
dustrial development committee,
Russell A. Bradley, commented,
"This transaction comes as no
surprise to our committee. It ap-
pears to be a "natural" for both
parties concerned - only Ann Ar-
bor is the loser."
The Hoover property will pro-
vide space for the expansion of the
University's plant services. It will
house the maintenance and ser-
vice shops, headquarters for its
general material and supplies in-
ventories, and its transportation
equipment.
PLANT SERVICE TO EXPAND
These services are presently
situated on North University in
one of the most crowded areas of
central campus.
According to University spokes-
men, these facilities have been in-
adequately housed for years. The
move also promises to help the
campus parking problem.
Vice-President Pierpoint said
that the Hoover location along the
railroad will be convenient for ex-
pansion and that existing factory
buildings can be adapted to Uni-
versity use with a m imum of
char~ge.
FREES SPACE FOR RESEARCH
. He explained that the University
plans to begin studies of the main
campus space that will be vacated
in order to decide its best use for
research and instructional activi-
ties.
Ike To Attend
Panama Meet
WASHINGTON (/P)-President
Dwight D. Eisenhower decided
yesterday to attend a July 21-22
Panama City conference of the
American republics after a period
of convalescence at his Gettysburg
farm starting this weekend.
But the President, planning tc
check out of Walter Reed Army
Hospital about Friday or Satur-
day, postponed talks with India's
Prime Minister Nehru which had
been arranged before his illness
for July 7-10.

ing more than 100 planes without
dismounting.
"We asked a lot of questions
and they were pretty good about
answering them. They let us take
out time, didn't hurry us at all,"
the U.S. air chief said.
Twining informed Defense Min-
ister Marshal Georgi Zhukov he'
would be unable to remain in Mos-
cow longer than next Sunday. This
meant cancelling planned visits to
Kiev and Leningrad which had
been scheduled for next Sunday
and Monday,
Twining and his group will re-
turn home by way of Berlin and
stop for 24 hours at Wiesbaden,
Air Force headquarters in Ger-
many, to attempt-to evaluate what°
they have seen here.
Judge Shot
By Gunmen
In Cyrus
NICOSIA, Cyprus (P)-Two gun-
men yesterday shot a British judge
who had passed six death sentenc-
es on pro-Greek rebels.
He was in a dangerous condition
last night.
Justice Bernard V. Shaw, 65,
suffered head and throat wounds.
The gunmen shot him while he
sat between two Turkish police
bodyguards in his car as it stop-
ped for a signal light in busy Vic-
toria Street. The assissination at-
tempt occurred shortly after 1 p.m.
in the teeming Armenian quarter
of the old walled city.
The two assailants, presumed to
be pro-Greek EOKA underground
workers, fled as Shaw's bqdyguard
opened fire and pursued them.
They leaped into a small car and
escaped.
At Nicosia General Hospital a
doctor said Shaw has a chance but
emphasized that his condition was
dangerous.
A Greek woman was fatally
wounded by troops who corodoned
gunmen. She was struck by a
bullet aimed at her husband and
off the area in a search for the
died in a hospital later.
A tall, gaunt man whose court-
room decisions were usually ren-
dered in quiet, caustic tone, Shaw
decreed six of seven death sen-
tences imposed since EOKA ex-
tremists began a violent campaign
more than a year ago to force
Britain to free the island for un-
ion with Greece. He had handed
down three death sentences in the
last three weeks.
'U' Extends
Bid To NSA.
(Continued from Page 1)

' U' Spnsors
Linguistics
Program
Students of linguistics from all
over the world are participating in
the Summer Linguistics Institute
which is being sponsored by the
University and 'the Linguistic So-
ciety of America.
Among the 175 students who are
registered in the eight week long
courses in the Summer Session,
there are five students from India,
three from Egypt and one from
Pakistan.
Faculty members include regular
members of the University faculty
and members of the faculties of
Dublin Institute for Advanced
Studies, Brown Univer'sity, Univer-,
sity of Chicago, University of
Southern California, and the Uni-
versity of California. Prof. Jerzy
Kurylowicz of the University of
Cracow, Poland, who was scheduledj
to be a member of the faculty wasf
unable to participate.
Courses are being offered in sev-
en special fields of study. These
include historical and comparatiyie
linguistics, the English language,
structural linguistics, teaching
methods, and general linguistics
studies. Special intensive courses
are offered in introductory Arabic,
Greek, Japanese, Latin and Rus-
sian.
The Linguistics Institute spon-
sors the Linguistic Forum Lec-
tures, which will be held every
Thursday evening. These lectures,
which will be of interest to all the
members of the Linguistic Institute
will be presented by several guest
lecturers.
As a part of the Institute, the
Linguistic Society of America will
hold its regular summer meeting
here on July 27 and 28.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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To Enforce
Driving Ban
iContinued from Page 1)
Regents lowered the age limit from
26 to 21 for a two year trial period.
The generally prevalent attitude
of students and administrators was
that the change would be success-
ful only if the new regulations were
rigidly enforced.
Enforcement of the old driving
ban had been lax.
A Different Problem
C vCommenting, on additional se-
curity officers for drinking viola-
tions Vice-President Lewis said,
"Drinking is an entirely different
problem. It has nothing to do with
the driving regulations. Any action
we take to increase enforcenent
will be taken up in September
with all interested student groups."
There has been speculation re-
cently that concern over increased
drinking enforcement is caused by
the fatal accident May 18 in which
a two-car, head-on collision killed
three University students and criti-
cally injured a fourth.
Police investigations of the acci-
dent revealed the students had
been drinking and the police re-
port strongly recommended addi-
tional supervision.
Saline Mill
OpensITonight
(Continued from Page 1)
Arcati, and Joan Conover plays
the maid,-Edith.
For its fourth season, the rest
of the plays at the Theatre, run-
ning in two-week intervals until
September, will be "Dial M for
Murder" by Frederick Knott and
"Pursuit of Happiness" by Law-
rence Langer. The last two plays
are yet to be announced.

Student F4

I

BOARD IN CO-OPS
$8.50 per week-
three meals a day
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Lester Co-op, 900 Oakland, 3-2929
Stevens Co-op, 816 S. Forest, 3-5974
FOR MEN ONLY
Nakamura Co-op, 807 S. State, 2-3219
Owen Co-op, 1917 Oakland, 8-7211
Apply to the Personnel Chairman of the
individual house.
For further information call
INTER-CO-OP COUNCIL, 8687

A
I

August 9, 16,
Matinee Sat., Aug.

11 & 13
11, 2:30 P.M.

SEASON TICKETS: $6.75-$5.00-$3.25
Single Tickets: Plays $1.50- $1.10-75c
Opera $1.75 -$1.40-$1.00
Evening Performances 8:00 P.M.
SEASON TICKETS ON SALE NOW -
BOX OFFICE OPEN 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Single Tickets on Sale July 2

0uh * t'* " -o " presents
RNERT TAYLOR
RICHARn TODD
DANA WYNTER
Emo'ND O'BRIEN

.1

CINEMAASCOP
SNEAK PREVIEW
TONIGHT AT 9:00

Soon
"T RAP EZE"

E
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gress," the Vice-President com-
mented.
Student Government Council
President Bill Adams, '57Bad, and
Janet Neary, '58, SGC vice-presi-
dent, will present plans for hold-
ing the Congress in Ann Arbor
next summer at Chicago this Aug-
ust.
Although details have not yet
been formulated, Vice-President
Lewis said every 'effort will be
made to present a favorable "pack-
age" to the Congress regarding
room and board rates.
Possible competition to the Tni-
versity could come from the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin which is bas-
ing its bid on the fact that next
summer will mark the 10th anni-
versary of NSA. The first NSA
Congress was held at Wisconsin.
NSA is a coordinating body for
more than 350 student govern-
ments in American Colleges and
Universities.

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LYDIA MENDELSOHN THEATRE
North End of League Building

I

,

BURT LANCASTER

-t
CPkd
Corner of Packard and Huron
1 block west of South Quad

Get the Most from Your
Summer Vacation!
So
Subscribe to the Summer
A -.

Your 1956 Summer
The Michigan League
The Air-conditioned Cafeteria
For luncheon, dinner and Sunday Dinner
The Air-conditioned Snack Bar
For breakfast, luncheon, and snacks
Everyday except Sundays
* Special Party and Banquet Service

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I

r w
.ter...

-m

mlj

THE SALINE MILL TIEATi

on U.S. 112-1/2 mile west of Saline, Michigan

delightedly presents

"BLITHE SPIRIT"

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