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June 30, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-06-30

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PAGE FO

THE MICIU MAII.Y

SATUK.LAY. JUNE; 30. 19W

PAGE FOUR TA1k~ MICUIGAN £bALL)~ SATLAU)AY, JUNE 341, 1gb'

". "o- -, i I I I I I I I ,, M-mom . I

I

LEAGUE BUSINESS MANAGER:
Edith Wheeler Quits Peculiar Jams Job

International, American
Student Activities Set Up

33 MADE PROFESSORS:
Announce 135 Promotions

Edith Wheeler, business man-
ager of the Michigan League, will
retire next Monday after working
nine years at a job that was orig-
inally to have lasted only six
months.
"I'm the original woman-who-
came-to-dinner," she says, "but
now I'm leaving to take up a job
which I left temporarily in 1947-
being Mrs. Benjamin Wheeler."
She says her business manager
title is really a misnomer, making
her sound like a "super accoun-
tant." She deals with everything
that goes on in the League, with
the exception of undergraduate
women's extracurricular activities
-and she is in close touch with
these as well.
'Peculiar Jams'
No two days have been alike
for her, she recalls, and because
"I'd never ask others to do what I
wouldn't do myself," there have
been some peculiar jams I've had
to pile into."
Example: cutting and dishing
out pie fora party of 250, followed
by a quick discard of apron to
discuss with League Board of Gov-
ernors plans for the half-million
dollar remodeling project, which
was completed in 1951.
Mrs. Wheeler has done most of
the personnel interviewing in the
League and in this capacity has
dealt with everyone from junior
high students to graduates well on
the way to a PhD.
Incidentally, she herself is a
University graduate, having re-
ceived her bachelor of arts degree
in 1924 and master of science in
1939.
Since the business manager is
responsible for the whole League
building, Mrs. Wheeler generally
conducts a first-thing-in-the-
morning tour, picking up loose
ends from the day before, solving
employee's problems, and arrang-
ing for use of the League's numer-
ous meeting rooms, which are in
constant demand.
Job Follows Her Home
Supposedly Mrs. Wheeler works
a 40-hour week, but remarks that
her job always follows her home.
"There's a classic saying in our
family whenever the phone rings
in the evening," she relates.
"Somebody's down the elevatorl
shaft at the League."
Previous experience qualifying
her for the League job? Mrs.
Wheeler says it's a conglomera-
tion: reporting for the University
alumni m'a g a z i n e; teaching
French, occupational therapy,
physical education; serving as
visiting nurse; and operating one

of the first cash-and-carry gro-
ceries.
A steady stream of students
have crossed her threshold in
her near-decade of service to the
University, and she believes that
today, although they are younger,
the- students "are better informed
in many respects than they were
during the years following the war
when we had the GI's."
'Serious Students
She adds, "The students seem
to take their University work just
as seriously today as they did then.
But they're not so worried about
the career they will achieve at the
end of their college years."
Although she is reluctant to
leave the League, Mrs. Wheeler
points out ruefully that she hasn't
even had time during these years
to tell funny stories about her
grandsons--two, ages 11 and five-
and-a-half. In addition, she
laughs, it will be an entirely new
experience for her husband to
have buttons on his shirts..
And speaking of her husband,
I knew I had to leave my job the
day Mr. Wheeler, a gentleman and
scholar in his own right, was in-
troduced three times at a gather-
ing as 'Mrs. Wheeler's husband."
'Mrs. Wheeler's Husband
"Mrs. Wheeler's husband" is
professor of history in the Uni-
Reports On
Jobless Asking
Benefits: Low
WASHINGTON ()-The Labor
Department reported today that
the number of workers claiming
state jobless benefits for completed
weeks of unemployment declined
by 49,000 to a new 1956 low of 1,-
193,200 during the week ended
June 16.
The decline was widespread, with
37 states reporting reduced num-
bers of continued claims for bene-
fits.
Initial claims for benefits, re-
flecting new unemployment, de-
clined by 3,800 to 193,700 during
the week ended June 23.
Special reports from seven states
employing more than three-
fourths of the nation's auto work-,
ers showed that 6,000 auto em-
ployes were laid off and 3,000 re-
called to work during the week
ended June 23.

versity and chairman of the facul-
ty counselors for juniors and sen-
iors in the literary college.
On Monday Mrs. Wheeler will
leave her desk for their 110-acre
farm on Webster Church Road
near Dexter. As an enthusiastic
gardener and outdoorswoman, she
is "looking forward to using the
manure spreader I got for Christ-
mas."
Still, she muses, "I'll probably
be like an old fire horse come fall
when the school year excitement
starts again. I'll want to be off
to the fire."
Open Gunaca
Feud With
Letters
LANSING M)-The John Gun-
aca extradition controversy has
erupted again with an exchange of
letters between Gov. G. Mennen
Williams and Gov. Walter Kohler
of Wisconsin.
And John Feikens, Republican
state chairman, chimed in with
more criticism of Williams' posi-
tion in the case.
Kohler wrote Williams he was
"most desirous" that Gunaca, a
Detroit organizer for the United
Auto Workers, be returned to face
felonious assault charges growing
out of strike violence in 1954.
"In our view there has never
been any reason to believe that Mr.
Gunaca would not receive a com-
pletely fair trial," he added.
In reply, Williams advised Koh-
ler that he did not fully agree on
the fair trial question and that
another matter had come up to
warrant further delay in action
on the extradition request.
Williams said the United States
Supreme Court has agreed to re-
view lower federal court rulings
that Gunaca must return to Wis-
consin on an NLRB subpena.
"Obviously, the court perceives
the question involved to be of suf-
ficient importance to warrant
hearing," the Michigan governor
said.
"And obviously if I were to ac-
cede to your request at this time
and return Gunaca to Wisconsin,
my action would have the effect
of interfering with the supreme
Court's proceding, and rendering
moot the question which the court
has determined to hear."
Kohler noted that his extradi-
tion request originated nearly two
years ago.
Since then, he said, "The news-
paper publicity and noteriety at-
tendant upon the strike referred
to has very materially subsided,
and as we view it, no possible ob-
jection to extradition in that re-
gard can be raised."
He said, "Wisconsin courts have
a reputation for fairness and that
he was confident you will respect
the integrity of our judicial pro-
cess."
Williams observed Gunaca had
taken the position in court that
NLRB subpena, sought by Kohler
Co., scene of the strike, is a "sub-
terfuge" intended to bring about
his prompt arrestand trial in
Wisconsin.
Feikens, who frequently before
has rapped Williams for inaction
in the case, said, "Now he is trying
to use the court action as a crutch
to support his position."

International Center and theV
International Students Association
have planned several activities for
international and American stu-
dents during the summer session.
Approximately 400 international
students are enrolled for the sum-
mer session.
James Davis, International Cen-
ter director, will host a picnic for
all international students at 4 p.m.
today at his home. Program for
the get-together will include
games and swimming.
First in a four-part series- of
lectures on American politics and
government will be presented at
7:30 p.m. Friday at the Inter-
national Center. Designed to help
acquaint foreign students - with
various procedures of the Ameri-
can election system, the series will
include two lectures this summer
and two in the fall.
Kollenbach To Lecture
Prof. Joseph Kallenbach of the
S ig Sisters'
Nancy Colwell, summer chair-
man of the International Commit-
tee of the League, has announced
that petitioning for 20 positions
as big sisters to foreign women
students in the fall will open Tues-
day.
The committee has already
chosen 50 women to serve as
orientation leaders and personal
friends to the new international
students, but an unexpected in-
crease in enrollment of inter-
national women has raised need
for a corresponding increase in
American women who will help
familiarize the new students to
America as well as campus cus-
toms.
Each American woman will
write a letter of introduction and
welcome to an international wo-
man during the summer, and in
the fall each will act as a guide
and friend to the new student.
Main purpose of the arrange-
ment is to promote friendship and
better relations between American
and foreign students at the Uni-
versity.
There are no special prerequis-
ites for the positions other than
the American women be interested
in doing all they can to help the
new students adjust to the United
States as well as to campus rou-
tine.

(Continued from Page 1)

political science department will
be the speaker for the summer
lectures, which are entitled., "How
Political Parties Are Organized"
and "National Conventions." The
second lecture will be presented
July 13. Both are open to all stu-
dents and faculty.
International Students Associa-
tion and the International Center
are co-sponsoring a reception and
informal dance for all students at
8 p.m. Saturday at the Rackham
terrace and Assembly Hall.
Thursday teas at the Pound
House are a weekly event through-
out the summer session as well as
during the school year. Refresh-
ments are served from 4:30 to 6
p..
ISA To Sponsor Picnic
ISA will sponsor a picnic at
Silver Lake for international stu-
dents and friends. Refreshments
will be provided and transporta-
tion to the lake may be arranged
at the International Center.
An outing on Lake Huron
aboard a racing sloop is being
sponsored by the International'
Center July 21.
ISA is sponsoring an all-campus
sport dance from 8:30 to 12 p.m.
July 28 on the Women's tennis
courts. Any type of sports dress is
'acceptable" and refreshments will
be served. Tickets may be obtain-
ed at the International Center.
Three large trips are planned
for international students in Aug-
ust. ISA will sponsor a boat trip
to Bob-lo Island Amusement Park
August 5. Reservations may be
made at the International Center.
ISA will also sponsor a trip to see
Riverama on Belle Isle in Detroit
August 18.
The International Center is
planning to take a group of new
students to the Michigan State
Fair in Detroit August 31. Passes
will be given to each student and
transportation will be by private
cars.
Information aboutr all these
events may be obtained at the In-
ternational Center.

School of Music: James B. Wal-
lace (Music Literature) and an ad-
ditional promotion from secretary
of the School of Music to Assist-
ant Dean. Frances Greer (Voice),
Florian F. Mueller (Oboe and
Wind Instruments Literature).
School of Natural Resources:
John E. Bardach (Fisheries). Lyle
E. Craine (Conservation), Alan A.
Marra (Wood Technology).
School of Public Health: Donald
C. Smith (Maternal and Child
Health).
To Assistant Professors
College of Literature, Science
and the Arts: John M. Allen (Zool-
ogy), Russell E. Bidlack (Library
Science), Irwin Brown (Speech),
Paul E. Cairns (Speech), William
R. Dawson (Zoology), George A.
DeVos (Psychology), Max Dufner
tGerman), Donald F. Eschman
(Geology), Frederick W. Gehring
(Mathematics). Lawrence W.
Jones (Physics), Ernest N. Mc-
Carus (Near Eastern Studies),
Stanley J. Segal (Psychology),
Robert W. Storer (Zoology), Kent
M. Terwilliger (Physics), Nathan
T. Whitman (Fine Arts).

College of Engineering: Dale M.
Grimes (Electrical).
College of Architecture and De-
sign: Leonard K. Eaton, (Archi-
tecture), Jack A. Garbutt (Draw-
ing and Painting), Joseph Tsu-An;
Lee (Architecture).
School of Business Administra-
tion: Lee E. Danielson (Industrial
Relations), George A. Elgass (Mar-
keting), Cho-ting Mao (Finance).,
School of Dentistry: Drs. Major
M. Ash, Jr., Hugh Cooper, Jr.,
Herbert D. Millard, George E.
Myers, Carmen M. Nolla, Harvey;
W. Schield, Jr.
School of Education: Ronald S.
Anderson, Stewart C. Hulslander
(Vocational Guidance).
Law School: Rinaldo L. Bianchi.
Medical School: Mathew Alpern
(Ophthamology), Harold J. Blum-
enthal (Bacteriology), Dr. Keith S.
Henley (Internal Medicine), Dr.
Daniel C. Hunter (Surgery), Ar-
thur G. Johnson (Bacteriology),
Dr. J. Richard Johnson (Internal
Medicine), Dr. Donald R. Korst
(Internal Medicine), Dr. George
H. Lawrence (Surgery), Peter P.
Ludovici (Obstetrics and Gyne-
cology), Dr. James A. McLean
(Internal Medicine), Dr. Joe D.
Morris (Surgery), Dr. William J.

Oliver (Pediatrics and Communi-
cable Diseases), Dr. Robert Rapp.
(Radiology), Dr. Ernest W. Rey-'
nolds- Jr. (Internal Medicine), Dr.
John G. Rukavina (Dermatology t
and Syphilology), Dr. Charles J,
Tupper (Internal Medicine), Dr.
Alexander B. Vial (Surgery), Dr.=
Park W. Willis, III, (Internal
Medicine).
School of Music: Leslie R. Bas-
sett (Theory and Composition).
R. Eugene Bossart (Vocal Litera-
ture and Accompanying), James
D. Salmon (Percussion Instru-
ments).
School of Natural Resources:
Norman C. Franz (Wood Tech-,
nology).
School of Public Health; John
J. Freysinger (Public Health-
Statistics).
To Supervisor
(Equivalent of Associate Professor),
Physical Education for Wornen:
Elizabeth Ludwig.
To Associate Supervisor
(Equivalent of Assistant Professor)
Physical Education for Men:
William G. Helms.
To Assistant To Dean
School of Nursing: Norma M.
Kirkeonnell.

rn 11

Come

to Church

Sunday

Y

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EFFECTIVE MONDAY:
University Relations Service
To Replace Five Activities

Five public relations activities
will be grouped into a new Uni-
versity Relations Service, Arthur
L. Brandon, director of University
Relations announced yesterday.
To become effective July 2, the
new unit will replace Information
and News Service and Special Pub-
lications activities. It will also
Incorporate three other areas -:-_
guest relations and guide service,
traveling arrangements for stu-
dent groups and the general pub-
lic information services (such as
the information desk in the lobby'
of the Administration Bldg.)
Wyllie Managing Editor
Cleland B. Wyllie, now News
Service director, will be managing
editor of News Service and related
functions and general informa-
tion.
Assisting magazines in the de-
velopment of stories will. be an-
other function of News Service.
Alice Beeman will be responsible
for regular publications such as
University Record, Letter to
Schools, the DOB and the Weekly
Calender. She will also carry on
research, for University Relations
work and handle special publica-
tions for promotional activities.
Andrew M. Doty will specialize
in engineering and science while
Noehren To Open
Music Programs
Prof. Robert Noehren, Univer-
sity Organist, will open the sum-
mer series of programs sponsored
by School of Music.
He will perform compositions
by Buxtehude, Vivaldi, Reger,
Messiaen, Frank and Schumann at
4:15 p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
The recital is open to the pub-
lic without charge.

Frank A. C. Davis will specialize
in medical and health, including
University Hospital.
Shortt in Field Services
Managing Supervisor of Univer-
sity Field Services will be James
D. Shortt, Jr., who will have charge
of schedule and business arrange-
ments for student organizations
which travel and also give pro-
grams on campus, non-educational
campus conferences and guest re-
lations.
He will also supervise off-cam-
pus relations with several groups.

Th~wizat
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THE STRETCH STOCKING that knows exactly
where to stop. Controlled stretch guarantees.
permanent custom fit, perfect gartering length.
No more sagging around the ankles, eliminates
crooked seams and cuts down on runs caused
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ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mosses Daily at 6:30 A.M., 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.,
9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. StateSt.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Hope Begins as
experience," Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Discussion group, topic pertinent to
Christian belief.
2:00 Cars leaving for picnic supper and evening
of fellowship at Logan's cottage.
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open
Daily.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur Zilligatt, Asst. Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon - "God's
Help Goes With Those Who Serve Him."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters, Student Advisor: Beth Mahone,
10:00 A.M. Student Bible study class.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship and Sermon--'l
Will Build My Church," Rev. Day.
7:00 P.M. Roger Williams Guild will hear Pro-
fessor Kenneth Boulding, who will speak on the
topic, "The Distinctiveness of a Christian
teacher."
Meeting is in the Guild House.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H, Redman, Minister.
Sunday-8:00 P.M. The Honorable Talbott Smith,
Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court will
speak on "The Philosophy of Dissent as Ap-
plied to the Courts."

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrews Church
(Breakfast at Canterbury House following the
9 o'clock.)
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
5:45 Buffet Supper.
7 o'clock open house.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian R*formed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
pes. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:45' A.M.--Meeting for Worship.'
9:30 A.M.--Child, care.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
'(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
. Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M. Bible Study-Galations.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
6:00 P.M. Supper Meeting - Speaker, Dr.
Gerhard Lenski "Should The Church Concern
Itself With Politics?"
Fourth of July Picnic-Meet at the Center at 3:00
P.M.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "THE PERFECTION OF FAITH."
7:00 P.M. "ME-A CHRISTIAN?"
7:30 P.M. Thursday-Prayer Meeting.
We extend a hearty welcome to each of you.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister:.
Win. S. Baker, University Pasto
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:15 and 11:00
Summer Fellowship for Students and Young
Adults, meet at Church at 1:45 P.M. for a
picnic outing.
Bible Study, "The Apostle Paul," Thursday, July
5th, at 8 o'clock.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meetiny.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.

I.

Ii.

-- 1

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SHORTHAND
ACCOUNTING
OFFICE MACHINES
A SINGLE SUBJECT or A COMPLETE COURSE
Hamilton Business College
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Ann Arbor Bank welcomes you
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Career and Tissue sheers 1.35 pr.
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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Director of Music Frank Stillings.
Church School through the summer for grades
from the Nursery to the sixth grade, meeting
at 10:45 A.M.
Public worship at 10:45. Sermon by Dr. Parr on
the subject, '"Brainwashing:' The Christian
Remedy."
Student Guild picnic at 5:30 P.M.

a

'1

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: Mixing Politics
and Religion.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THE CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES GUILD

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL j
and STUDENT CENTER

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