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August 15, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rAGE POUR

WE~tESDT. AGUS I5,I95

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W uDNV. 'DaT " rit 71 Iu"a1l

,

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS:
'U' Workshop Trains Journalists

USES WIND TUNNEL MODELS:
'U' Researcher

Tests Smoke Stacks

The High School Journalism
Workshop is ending its sixth year
of operation under the auspices of
the Department of Journalism.
With the largest enrollment of
two hundred so far in the six
years, the workshop is attended at
two week intervals by students
who will work on their high schord
publications.
The workshop is directed by
Prof. Wesley H. Maurer of the
journalism department, while Prof.
John Field acts as assistant chair-
man and coordinates workshop ac-
tivities.
Workshop Instructors
Assisting in the workshop's year-
book division is Matti Crump, ad-
visor to student publications in
Arthur Hill High School, Saginaw
and Robert Beauchamp, chairman
of the department of English and
department of publications, Pon-
tiac Senior High School, works
with the newspaper section.
The major emphasis in the news-
paper division is directed toward
maturity in publications, designed
to broaden backgrounds and better
insight into newspaper problems.
Each two-week group works and
puts together their own newspaper
whereby the various members of
the workshop follow-up assign-
ments, write headlines, make up
dummy pages and write editorials.
Yearbook Emphasis
The emphasis in the yearbook
section of the workshop is on con-
tent and development of theme
and design. They work to prepare
attractive, readable copy with
makeup and pictures playing im-
portant roles.
These high school students who
attend the workshop come from
the states surrounding the Great
Lakes and many of them are spon-
sored by commercial newspapers.
The workshoppers live in the
dorms on campus and follow a
busy schedule which is mapped out
for them by their instructors
which includes a tour of the cam-
pus, lectures, special group assign-
ments and the regular workshop
lab sessions.

Detailed wind tunnel models of
industrial power plants have been
used by a University civil engineer
since 1935 to combat air pollution.
He is Prof. Robert H. Sherlock,
who begins his retirement furlough
this summer after pioneering in
the use of models to study the
ways industrial gases behave after
being introduced into the atmos-
phere.
From his research have come
scores of reports, technical articles
and practical suggestions as to
how power plant smoke stacks
should be designed or altered to
avoid blanketing nearby areas with
downwashing gases.
Set up Models
To reach these conclusions, Prof.
Sherlock and his associates set up
models of the plants under study
and their surroundings in the test
section of a low-speed University
wind tunnel.
The tunnel's eight-bladed pro-
peller then sucks air past the model
as smoke ejection speed and other
factors are varied, the researchers
take hundreds of photographs to
record whether the smoke escapes
in a stable plume or is carried to
the ground beyond by turbulent
air currents.
If the plume remains undis-
turbed for several thousand feet
beyond the plant, it generally
will be safely absorbed, Professor
Sherlock points out.

~1
I

WIND TUNNEL MODEL-University mechanical engineer Frederick Boutwell adds a smokestack to
model of a Long Island, N. Y. power plant whose design is being tested in a University wind tunnel.
Researchers can tell how smoke from real stacks will behave.

"The atmosphre has great
capacity to disperse contaminants
provided they are introduced prop-
erly," he notes. "It is when the
gases cannot be forced high
enough to escape local turbulence
caused by the tension, buildings
or the stack itself that trouble

DUMMY MAKEUP-Bob Beauchamp explains the intricasies of making up a page to his
workshop students,

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arises in the form of downwash
and smog."
Gases Out of Reach
In most cases, an increase in
stack height or ejection velocity
carries the gases out of the reach
of turbulence, Prof. Sherlock says.
In other situations, it is necessary
to change the shape of the plant
or nearby structures so as to elimi-
nate the turbulence itself.
He recalls that stack height at
one plant could not be increased
becauses it was near the end of
an airport runway. After a wind
tunnel study, he suggested
"streamlining" the building by ter-
racing a high, unbroken wall which
deflected winds upward in trouble-
some currents. This was done, and
the situation alleviated.
The most striking example of
the use of stack height to elimi-
nate downwash is at Clifty Creek,
Ind., where the stacks of a power
station have been built 682 feet
high at Prof. Sherlock's suggestion.
They are the tallest in the world,
and their gases will clear heavily
populated hills on the north bank
of the Ohio River. Most stacks are
less than 250 feet high.
Work Complicated
Prof. Sherlock's work is compli-
catedby the fact that most plants

are located along rivers or lake',
for the hills that are generally ,
close by create air turbulence,
Because of the aerodynamic and
meteorological factors involved
Prof. Sherlock also draws upon
University experts in those field
for assistance.
The volume of his work, con-
tracted through the University's
Engineering Research Institute,
has increasesd sharply in recent
years as companies seek volun- 4
tarily to control downwash at a
time of growing public interest in
air pollution. He accepts only
those projects which present a
challenging research problem.
His studies of the effects of wind
in power lines and poles from 1927T
to 1934 led to his entry into the
air pollution field. A Chicago
power plant that was emitting four,
million cubic feet of gas every
minute heard of his work, and
turned to him for help. An exten- 4
sive field survey convinced him
it would be easier to reproduce the
plant in a wind tunnel for study.
From this model came recommen-
dations that eliminated all cases
of downwash, and his career Was
launched.

......................

I

U

STUDENTS!

Story by
DONNA HANSON
Pictures by
DON WATK I NS

LEAVE laundry in the Morning
PICK UP in the Afternoon.

If Preferred, Do-It-Yourself
In One Hour.

HEADLINES-Student ponders AP COPY-Prof. Field, students mark up AP copy for their
over a difficult headline.,- . workshop paper.

11

0 SHIRT SERVICE

* DRY CLEANING

* INDIVIDUAL WASHERS ® AIR CONDITIONED'

510 EAST WILLIAM
Around the Corner from Michigan Daily

Enjoy PIZZA
at the
DEL RIO RESTAURANT
122 West Washington at Ashley
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
BEER and WINE served
Hours: 11 A.M.-12 P.M. (Closed Tues.)
Phone NO 2-9575
I-i

I

PRE -INVENTORY (LEARANCE OF
ALL OUR SUMMER SPORTSWEAR!

4

l
i
4 J y

Y2
OFF!
Many darker skirts, sweaters
and blouses all good for Fall,
too, included in groups.

I

HOLD IT!-Yearbook student photographer snaps picture PICTURE WORK-Students in yearbook division do much
for publication. makeup work with pictures.

Gossard's pantie girdle your
legs can't feel seems
barely there in elastic lace
with elastic net around
the up-shaped legs. Yet
you're smoothed
beautifully. Boneless
pull-on with satin?
elastic panel.
P"5"

CAMPUS TOGS
1111 South U.
We close Sat. 1:00 P.M. for two
weeks.
Main Shop on S. Forest will re-
main open.

'

,

e
.0

Don't forget to stock up on
/rI~

w ,, ,...._. .:_ .. ..

II

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