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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 14, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.I''1ft1f 1'A 1I 4 A

T ENCUEAN fDAILY

PAGE TAREE

A

LUU .x 14i, 1x.6 yJaU

._. . .

Hodge Gives
~Guilty Plea,
008 13 Ic
'Goesto ,fail
fiPR2;NGIELD7, Ill. WP-Oriville
E. Hodge, pale and tense, pleaded
1r"guilty yesterday to charges involv-
ing his million-dollar check-cash-
ing swindle, then went to jail to
awaIt sentencing next Monday.
The dapper, free-spending ousted
Illinois state auditor told his at-
torneys he wanted to be sent to
prison immediately.
When Circuit Judge Clem Smith
announced a week's delay before
fixing punishment, the once-influ-
ential Republican official slumped
in his chair with head bowed, a
haggard look on his face.
Taken to Jail
Hodge, 52 years old, who had
been free on $100,000 bond, was
taken immediately to the Sanga-
mon County Jail and placed in a
cell tier with seven other prisoners.
His attorneys said they would
seek permission to remove him to
a Springfield hospital on the
i grounds he is ill and needs medical
attention.
Since he has been sitting out
the days in seclusion at his plush
Lake Springfield home, Hodge has
been treated by a physician and a
psychiatrist, who reported he was
depressed and exhausted.
Judge Issues Writ
A few hours later, Federal Judge
John P. Barnes in Chicago issued
a writ directing Sheriff Arthur
Gross of Sangamon County to
;4 produce Hodge for arraignment in
Chicago tomorrow morning on
federal charges of misapplyingj
$872,000 in federally insuredj
bonds.
4 The charges against Hodge in-
clude 329 counts of forgery, em-j
bezzlement, confidence game and
conspiracy with possible prison
terms ranging from one to five
y and one to 15 years on each count.
The indictments charged him
with looting the state treasury of
i nearly $650,000 but prosecutors
have said the amount will run
over a million. The scandal same
to light in July.
lodge, who once dreamed of
p becoming Illinois governor, has
taken full blame for the scheme
in which bogus state warrants were
cashed, although his former office
manager, Edward A. Epping, has
been indicted on similar charges.
Hodge has said he spent the
money on high living, bad invest-
ments and campaigning.
During the court proceedings,
Hodge answered with a weak, al-
Smost inaudible, "Yes, sir" when
Judge Smith inquired if he desired
to change his previous plea of in-
nocent to guilty.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
the Bureau of Appointments to inter-
view candidates at this time.
Chelsea, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (early);+ Home Economics;
Girls Physical Education; Art; Social
science.-
Hale, Michigan - Teacher Needs; Ele-
mentary (Kdg.); Shop/Math.
Howel, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Latin/English; Girls Physical Educa-
tion/Junior High Science; English;
Science (Gen. Sci/Biology; Mathema-
tics.
Inikster, Michigan (Dearborn Twp.
District No. 8) - Teacher Needs: Ele-
-mentary; High School Counsellor: Eng-
lish (Jr. High).
St. Clair, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:

English/Speech.
Whitehall, Michigan--Teacher Needs:
Junior High Social Studies or Gen.
4 Science; Spanish/English; Industrial
Arts.
Toledo, Ohio (Mary Manse College -
Teach&r Needs: Math/Physics.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg. No. 3-1511, Ext. 489.

How the U.S. and Russia Compres.
e~~~~ ~ 1 RUESSIAdstia ied

U.S-

B RITAI N
Sid ihest
1.9

.YraHuTkest
~14
PIG IRON
Milions of Tons

W.GERMANY
RSA3xdHrhes
21 1
CEMENT]CoaL
Millions of Toms Millions of Tons

U.S.

BRITAIN
21
STEEL
Millions of Tons

RUSSIA BRITAIN
149 ,andHigkest
75
LECTRICgIToY
of Kilowatts ,

Ci.S.
334
VENEZUELA
2nd Hzygest
Ill RUSSIA
A65
Millions of Tons

Higheat
377
I.S. RUSSIA
279 265
WOVEN WOOL
Millions of Yards

Legislatures
Concerned,
Analyst Says
Administrative rules and regula-
tions, often questioned by the ordi-
nary citizen, are fast becoming a
major concern of state legislatures,
according to a report scheduled for
publication by the University this
fall,
The legislatures themselves have
spawned a lot of the rules indirect-
ly through th creation of numer-
ous state administrative agencies,
with power to regulate various
activities, explains David L. Hoye,
legislative analyst at the Univer-
sity's Legislative Research Center.
Now-partly as a result of citizen
protests-the law makers have be-
gun to take steps to insure that
administrative rule-making re-
mains within boundaries stablished
by legislation. At least 19 states
have passed acts prescribing mini-
mum standards for administrative
action, he notes in a manuscript
prepared for "Currnt Trends in
State Legislation."
Michigan's activity in this area
dates back to 1943, when the
legislature passed an act requiring
publication of administrative rules
after their approval by the attor-
ney general.
Expressing his support for more
action of this kind by other states, 1..H w a s h e e f c
Howe says, ". . . the mere fact
that the agencies are aware that
their actions are being subjected to
regular scrutiny and control from
an outside source . . . would act
as an inhibiting factor against
misuse or excessive use of rule-
making powers."
He suggests that legislatures can
exercise this watch-dog function
best by avoiding any general re-
quirement that all rules be ap-
proved by the legislature before
becoming operative and by con-
centrating their attention on new
rules or ones protested by the
public.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.'
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
ROOMS FOR RENT
GRADUATE STUDENT wishes to share'
apartment with one or two men.
$45 each. Call Myron Braunstein,
7-10 P.M. NO 2-4401, ext. Michigan
309. D
PERSONAL
LAST CHANCE to subscribe at Student
Discount rates-Save 40% to 60% on
Time, Life, Sports Illustrated, etc.
Phone Student Periodical, NO 2-3061
Days and evenings. )F
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED TYPIST in disserta-
tion, term papers, etc. All work done
on electric typewriter. Ph. NO. 2-7605.
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
aratelyt Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. }J
fSIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156. )S
USED CARS
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer. Call NO
3-8460.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED, Two male graduate
students willing to share driving and
travel expenses to Boston or N. Y,
city, leaving on Aug. 18. See or call
Harvey A. Glashow, Mich. Hse. West
Quad. NO 2-4401.)G

FOR SALE
MOVING-Selling 10 Rooms of Good
used furniture, 518 E. William, NO 3-
8454 after 4:00 pm. Friday. )B
FOR THE LONG AND TALL. our 6'x7'
king-size bed $50; also boys topcoat
$10; football shoes $5; ice skates $2;
percolatfor $4: imetal Ironin+, board S5:I
shoeiracks $3. Call NO 2-8844a B
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
WANTED TO RENT
6 to 10 Foreign Students wish to rent a
house near campus on quasi-perman.-
ent basis. Reply Box SL-3, Michigan
Da"ily.'
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-lady's watch. Call NO 2-4401
Rm. 211 Wenley. )A

APARTMENTS FOR RENT
31, ROOM furnished apartment behind
Rackham Bid. Sublet August 20th -
February. $80. NO 3-6917 evenings or
weekends. C
FOR RENT
DELUXE FURNISHED campus Apart-
ment for 3-4 girls. Private bath, large
lIving room, $140 per month, 12 month
lease. Apt. 1, 331 Packard, Phone NO
3-8134. 1C
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I'

FEEDS

J

Source: U.N. Statistical Yearbook

K AP'

PNawsfeatvs.rte.

U.S. Industrial Rate Beats Russia

By A. I. GOLDBERG
Associated Press Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS (R)) - The
Russians may have hopes of over-
taking the United States this year
in the Olympic athletic competi-
tion, but they have a long, long
cU' Research
Team Studies
Steel Growth
Should the steel industry expand
its capacity? If so, how can ex-
pansion be financed?
The answer to these questions--
basic to the future of the American
economy-are now being sought by
a University business research
team . financed by the Brookings
Institution.
Prof. Donald R. G. Cowan, who
heads the research, points out that
Russia, West Germany and Great
Britain all have faster growing
steel industries than the U.S. At
present, he adds, American steel
makers plan to add about 4 million
tons a year to their output.
Whether this planned growth
will be sufficient to meet the na-
tion's growing defense needs and
consumer demand is a key question
facing industry, labor and the
public.
Since expansion of steel capacity
requires a large volume of this
basic metal, the professor notes,
accelerating the present rate of
growth could place a severe strain
on existing plants, most of which
has been operated at or near 100
per cent capacity for the past two
years.
The cost of expanding steel
capacity is also exceptionally
high, the professor says. In gen-
eral, industry has three alterna-
tives for financing expansion:
1. Increasing profit margins on
present production- a step which
tends to curb expansion of the steel
market, open new demands by
organized labor and raise opposi-
tion among steel users;
2. Putting increased capacity
on a "pay-as-you-go" basis, using
investment capital from outside
,sources-a cdstlY method becausE
of today's high interest rates; and
3. Introducing more modern
methods of manufacture, involving
lower capital requirements and
labor costs-a process which in-
volves increased expenditures foi
basic research and steel making.

Conte to eftot.with .''.
"AQUA FLLES
AUGUST 18, 1956
Meet at 6:30 p.m. at the
International Student Center
Sign up at the I.S.A. office in the International Center,
The $2.25 price includes all transportation

row to hoe in making good any
boast they'll ever pass the United1
States in industrial production.
For years, the outside world
could only guess at Soviet produc-
tion figures. Now, in line with the
asserted Soviet "new look" and its
avowal to make more use of the
United Nations, the Russians have
furnished the UN Statistical Year-
book with a batch of carefully se-
lected figures in eight fields - the
ones in which they are second or
third among the nations of the
world.
Theye're still silent on their
position in 175 other fields listed
in the yearbook's statistical tables.
It is presumed that if they were
even close, they would have come
up with information on their pro-
duction in these fields too.
In the world industrial arena,
the United States has a clear lead
in nearly 60 important products-
from alumnium to butter. It also
has enough seconds, thirds and
fourths in other fields to clearly
outshine any other nation if in-
dustrial might were measured like
an Olympic meet.
The new Soviet figures did indi-
cate extraordinary advances from
1937 through 1954 in production
of the eight products on which
they reported: coal, crude petro-
leum, pig iron, steel, cement, elec-
trio energy, woven cotton fabrics
and woven woolen fabrics.
But as the accompanying chart
shows, in 1954 they were close to
the United States in only two
fields, woven woolens and coal.
The Russians claimed a sharp
increase in electric energy output,
a highly significant statistic be-
cause electricity is the key to ex-
panding other production.
In 1929, Russia's electrical out-
put was 6,200,000,000 kilowatts. In
1937 it was 36,200,000,000. But
1950 the figure reached 90,900,-
000,000 and in 1954 it was 149,-
400,000,000, the yearbook says,

A Russian propaganda publica-
tion ,the Soviet Weekly, boasts
that 1955 production was 170 bil-
lion kilowatts and that by 1960
Soviet power stations will be gen-
erating 320 billion. The magazine
claims Russia roselfrom 15th place
among producers of electricity in
1920 to second place now, with
current output in the Soviet Union
exceeding that of Britain, France
and Sweden combined. /
In addition to completing new
waterpower stations producing
about three million kilowatts each
by 1960, the Russians say that
atomic energy will be operating
stations of similar size in areas
short of local fuel resources. They
have claimed for two years that
they took the initiative in pro-
ducing electric energy through
atomic power.
The Russians have talked for
a long time, of course, about what
they plan to do. Future statistical
yearbooks should show whether
they've really done it.
Public Health
Allots Funds
WASHINGTON (/P)-The Publi
Health Service yesterday an-
nounced tentative allotments of
federal aid funds to the states
under the new Water Pollution
Control Act.
Congress recently authorized
federal grants of 50 million dollars
a year for the construction of mu-
nicipal sewage treatment works.

1
I
r
c
f
s

U

August Store Hours - Mon. thru Fri. 9:30 till 5:30; Sat. 9:30 till 1:00

Last Week of our
V2-year Clearance.
EVERYTHING MUST GO!

Dresses . . . Suits
Coats . . . Sportswear . . . and
Accessories at 1/2 and more off
Coats ... Sportswear . .. and
Extraordinary values in
wide choice of seasonal Merchandise.

TYPEWRITERS
Office & Portable Models
of all makes
Sold - Bought
Repaired - Rented

Special Group of SPRING COATS and
SUITS . .. all 100% Wool . . . orig.
39.95 to 65.00 ... now at $19.95 to
$29.95.
Group Rayon-Acetate SUITS & DUST-
ER COATS . .. orig 19.95 to 35.00
.now - a $10.00 to $17.50.
Group of SUMMER HANDBAGS -
Straws, Plastics and Leathers . . . orig.
2.95 to 10.95 . . . Nylon Blouses, sizes
32-44 . . . no-iron cotton slips, orig.
$5.95 ...Hundreds of pieces of cos-
tume jewelry and rings, originally
$1.00 to $12.95 - now 1.

HUNDREDS of Beautiful DRESSES -
Cottons - Nylons - Orlons - Dark-
er Crepes . . . Also Evening Cocktail
& Bridesmaid Dresses..,. orig. $25.00
to $49.95 . .. now at $12.50 to $25.
Group of WEDDING DRESSES. . . Bal-
lerina Floor Length & Chapel trains
. orig. 49.95 to 89.95 . . . sizes
10-16 .. now $25.00 to $45.00,
Group of SUMMER SPORTSWEAR
plus closeout group of Sweaters,
Blouses . . . at 1/2, many pieces less
- at the S.U. shop.
ALL SALES FINAL

Special Group of DRESSES . . . many
Drip-Dry cottons - Docrons & Nylons
-- also close out groups of better
dresses . . . orig. to $25.00 . . . now
$7.00 to $10.00 . . . Sizes in all
groups: 7-15, 10-44, 12/ 2-24 12, Tall
10, 20.
ALL SUMMER HATS . . . also some
dark felts, Velours, Velvets. . . . Orig.
were $3.95 to $14.95,... now $1.49
to $5.00.
PHOENIX NYLON HOSE Reg.
$1.35 . . . now $1.19, 3 prs. $3.55
... Reg. $1.65 . , . now $1.39, 3 prs.
$4.15.

Organization
Notices
Congregational and Disciples student
Guild, Tuesday, 4:30 p.m., Informal
mid-week tea, Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son.
Panhellenic announces that registra-
tion for fall rushing is now being held
at the Undergraduate Office in the
Michigan League Monday through Fri-
day between 9:00-12:00 a.m. and 1:30-
5:30 p.m.

Stationery & Supplies
MORRILL S
3145S. State St.

I_

.: .

...

'11

GROOME'S BATHING BEACH
WHITMORE LAKE, MICHIGAN
-3rd Annual-
BATHING BEAUTY CONTEST

big wheel

S

in the dorm

OUR BICYCLE PRINT PAJAMAS,
SCUFFS AND TRAVEL CASE SETS

ENTRY BLANK

Saturday, Aug. 18, 1956-4 P.M.

Name

Address

City

Age

Phone Number

II

Designed to travel around the world, across
country or back to the campus ...
our tailored cotton broadcloth pajamas with a boxe
PLUS matching quilted scuffs and a compact easy-
pack envelope case. Rose or turquosie bicycle print
and piping on white. Sizes 32 to 40.
5.95 the complete set

er waist,h
3s.? i 011 '
< E , >- ,

1

Prizes:
BULOVA "MISS AMERICA"-RIECKHOFF JEWELER-SALINE
$25.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE-GOODYEARS, INC.-ANN ARBOR

I

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