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July 31, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-31

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TUSDAY', JLY 1,1956

I'mE CHIGAN DAILY

IPAJMV. q4AMIt"

THE MICHIGAI'i BATT'V

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SERIOUS PROBLEM:
Egypt Faces Growing Pains
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Suez Canal Republicans
Seizure Get Blame
Discussed For Taxes

__

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

l

CLASSIFIEDS

(Continued from Page 2)
not belong to any special political
camp. "This is quite symptiomatic
of Egyptian tendencies," he ob-
served.
Prof. N. Marbury Efimenco of
the political science department
foresaw three possible lines of pro-
test by England and France: dem-
onstration of naval power, a com-
bined warning from the Big Three
and economic pressure such as is
being used now in freezing Egyp-
tian accounts in France and Eng-
land.
"Actually," he observed, "every-
thing depends on how far Nasser
goes through with his challenge of
the West. Nationalization does not
solve the fundamental problem,
but it can be settled with the canal
remaining nationalized as hap-
pened in Iran."
Must Be Settlement
Prof. Efimenco pointed to sev-
eral actions by Egypt on which
the final solution must depend.
"First, nationalization must be
followed by settlement of any
claims of stockholders. Otherwise
Nasser's action is contrary to in-
ternational law."
Settlement also depends on how
arbitrary the Egyptian government
is in setting rates on tonnage
through the canal.
Another condition upon which
final settlement depends is wheth-
er or not Egypt retaliates against
England's and France's freezing
of assets.
Time Element
Final factor is the time element.
"If Great Britain, France and the
United States can maintain fairly
complete economic sanctions
against Egypt, they could strangle
that country's economy," he said.
This would result in two possi-
ble moves: Nasser might be forced
to make terms with Russia for aid
and therefore tie Egypt's economy
completely with Moscow, or an in-
ner revolt in Egypt's miiltary re-
gime might bring in a more con-
servative leader who could settle
the issue with the west.
"A blockade wouldn't be of long-
run advantage to Great Britain
or France," he conceded, "but by
power politics they are taking a
gamble in attempt to force Egypt
into more conservative action."
As for Egypt paying compensa-
tion for foreign interests in the
company, Prof. Efimenco ob-
served that if Egypt wants to put
most of the profits from the canal
into the Dam, it would have dif-
ficulty in meeting payments on
any large compensation figure.
"Compensation really depends
on whether Egypt has an export
market for its cotton," he said.
"Any economic sanctions by the
West would make it impossible for
Egypt to pay for the nationaliza-
tion."

LANSING () -- Neil Staebler.
Democratic state chairman, said
yesterday "If high state taxes were
running business out of Michigan,
then the Republican party ought
to be ashamed of itself."
The reason, Staebler said, is that
the "principal tax on business is
the business receipts tax, which,
was steam rollered through the
legislature by Republicans."
The Democratic chieftain's state-
ment renew an argument that
waxed hot last week at hearings
held by a special interim com-
mittee of the Republican-control-
led Senate.
The committee was set up to
measure the effect of the state's
tax structure on employment.
Last Tuesday and Wednesday, a
parade of businessmen and spokes-
men for the Michigan Manufac-
turers Association sketched a pic-
ture to the committee of tax bur-
dens so heavy as to drive business
out of the state and to prevent
new industry from coming in. #
"The current Republican attack
on the Williams Administration is
a good example of the shoddy
propaganda the GOP hopes to sell
the voters this year," Staebler de-
clared.
He cited figures issued by the
Economic Development Commis-
sion showing an expansion of in-
dustry, and an accelerating rate
of move-ins from outside the state.
Speech Play
Set to Open
Tomorrow
Christopher Fry's poetic comedy,
"The Lady's Not for Burning,"
will be presented by the University
Departmenttof Speech,nbeginning
at 8 p.m. tomorrow and contin-
uing through Saturday.
Under direction of visiting pro-
fessor James Brock, "The Lady's
Not for Burning" is the fourth
play on the speech department's
summer playbill.
As.a romantic verse comedy, this
play concerns a misanthropic
young man who pretends to have
committed crimes in order to re-
ject life. There is also the compli-
cation of a beautiful girl who ac-
cepts life even as she is about to
be burned because of a witchcraft
charge.
Set in a picturesque medieval
period, the 15th century costumes
and scenery for the production
are designed by Marjorie ;smith
and Edward Andreasen,
After three hundred perform-
ances in England, "The Lady's Not
for Burining" opened on Broadway
in 1950 and continued to play

(Continued from Page 2)
Howell, Michigan " Teacher Needs:
High School Latin.
Morrice, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Early Elementary; High School Science;
Commercial; Men's Physical Education.
New Lenox, Illinois -- Teacher Needs:
Business Education (Office Machines/
Bookkeeping/Business English); Speech/
Dramatics/English.
New Paltz, New York-Teacher Needs:
Elementary (1st); 7th/8th grade So-
cial Studies; Girls' Physical. Education;
Special Class.
Petoskey, Michgian - Teacher Needs:
Kindergarten; Girls' Physical Educa-
tion.
Pontiac, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Junior High Art,
Racine, Wisconsin - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (2nd, 3rd, 5th, 0th); Ju-
nior High Commercial; Senior High In-
dustrial Arts; Physical T h e r a p i s t;
Speech Therapist.
Republic, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Industrial Arts; English (Grades 7-10.)
Rocky Ford, Colorado - Teacher Needs:
Spanish.
Marysville, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
High School English.
Roseville, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary (Kdg., 1st, 2nd); Junior
High English; Shop; Vocal Music;
arithmetic; High School Industrial Arts.
MORE MORE MORE*MORE
Sparta, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (1st Grade).
Trenton, Michigan -Teacher Needs:
Elementary (4th Grade).
Tulare, California -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary.
Walled Lake, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Elementary; Speech Correction;
Visiting eacher.
Whitehall, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
High School vocal Music; Industrial
Arts; Spanish/English.
Willow Run, Michigan -- Teacher
Needs: Elementary (2nd, 3rd, 4th).
South San Francisco, California --
Teacher Needs: Elementary (Grades 4
to 8) ; High School Mentally-handt-
capped; Vocal Music/other subjects;
Industrial Arts.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, No. 3-1511, Ext.
489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Philadelphia Quartermaster Depot,
U. S. Army, Philadelphia, Pa., has a
need for one Analytical Statistician -
GS 12 - with 7 years of experience and
for one Physical Science Administrator
--GS 13 -- with a BS in Physical Set-
ence,( Math, or Engrg. and three years
of experience.
Dept. of Navy, Bureau of Ordnance,
offers employment opportunities to
Professional Engineers, Mathematicians,
Chemists, Physicists, Metallurgists and
Electronic Scientists in Calif., Wash.
D.C., Ind., Ill., N.J., R.I., Va., Canal
Zone and Hawaii.
For information contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin, Bldg.,
ext. 371
Organization
Notices
Big Little Sister Tea: Given by the
Junior nurses for the Sophomore nurses
tonight, 7:00 p.m. Couzen Assembly
Room.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Informal mid-week tea, today, 4:30
p.m., Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Emmmmm~rnm

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
SClassified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Pansy Cluster Pin. crossing cam-
pus. Reward. NO 2-6530, Dorothy Ave-
rill.)A
WANTED TO RENT
TWO MEDICAL students want small
comfortably furnished apartment for
coming two years, Near campus. NO
2-3339. )L
GRADUATE STUDENT-Would like to
rent a room or an apartment as of
September. Prefers that it be close to
campus. If interested, write Louis J.
Pansky, 2470 N. 50th St. Milwaukee,
Wisconsin. )L
HELP WANTED
MATURE STUDENT COUPLE - for
house parent position in small men's
international house. A child - wel-
comed. Call NO 3-3220 for further in-
formation.)H
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
4-ROOM furnished apartment, two bed-
rooms and bath. 1223 S. State. Avail-
able now. Accomodates four adults.
No drinking. Utilities garage. Dial
3YP Ypsilanti 3-615xm.)S
ROOM AND BOARD
WANTED-Room and Board or bache-
lor Apt. or room with kitchen privil-
eges. Univ. Bus. Ad. instructor NO
31511, ext. 2857, 11:15-12:15. )E
USED CARS
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTABtE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer. Call NO
3-8460. )N
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately l Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
SITUATION WANTED

ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
003a or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
1on distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156,.1
FOR SALE
1951 HOUSE TRALER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Con-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020, )B
PERSONAL
YOUNG GRADUATE WOMAN-is look-
ing for a roommate and a place to
live near campus, Call NO 3-3575. )F
I -wt h~fl 21 L I
DIAL Nr*2-1113

22
18
.1

up-Population
~S .

60 OWN-'er Capita
L . Share of
L:: Crop Land
0'z'tECAU54 POPULATN INAS
'RISEN FASMTTAN LAND
iiE?:afc Si~iiiii10'UNDERCULTY.AT/ON A1O4'E?
°'i iP~pP1ENow 'LiV OFFLESS'
iT: LAND )71AN50 aYEAPS AGO
SL4:I

-I
Coming Friday
DEAN MARTIN &v
JERRY LEWIS
in
"PARDNERS"
FWw --
N AetiI !4~e?)~certC~n

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.10

DIL Nt O 2-51

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Eves. Only 7-9 P.M.

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.189,' 1907

:917 4l927 1937 1947.1954 %$7 1907 1917 1927 1937

1947 1954

- I.-,,. - - I mmlmmmmmm I I

(..

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Although it doesn't usually make
newspaper headlines, Egypt has a
domestic problem that in the long
run may be just as important to
her future as the Arab-Israeli dis-
pute.
The ancient country of the Nile
is in the midst of a severe popula-
tion explosion. Her birth rate is
among the highest of any nation
in the world at about 50 per 1,000
population each year. This birth
rate combined with a recent sub-
stantial decline in the death rate
due to improving medical care has
given her an annual rate of growth
of 2.7 per cent-nearly twice the
world average.
The effects of rapidly mounting
population pressure are com-
pounded in Egypt because of un-
favorable geography.
According to the Population
Reference Bureau of Washington,
D.C., a private organization deal-
ing with population problems,
more than 96 per cent of Egypt's
total land area of about 386,000
square miles is barren desert. The
remaining four per cent is the fer-
tile land of the Nile delta and val-
ley, the ancient source of Egypt's
food supply.
The result is that practically all
of the population is compressed in-
to the Nile trough, giving this
fraction of the country's total land
area a population density of 1,670
persons per square mile. Similar
concentration on agricultural land,
the Population Reference Bureau
says, can be found only in com-
paratively limited areas in Java,
the Ganges Valley of India, and
the Yangtze Valley in China.
As the chart below the accom-
panying map shows, the Egyptian
population has more than doubled
since 1897, with the angle of rise
increasing in 1937 and turning
sharply upward in 1947. The es-
timated population in mid-1954
was 22,651,000. Ten years from
now it is expected to be some 30
million.
While the population increased
105 per cent between 1897 and
1949, the land under cultivation

rose only about 14 per cent. The 1
tremendous disparity b e t w e e n
growth of population and in-
crease in cultivated land was off-
set to some extent by greater use
of available land,
Irrigation has made possible the
harvesting of two or three crops
a year on the same land instead
of one. But even with this im-
provement, Egypt's total "crop
area" (counting double or triple
use of irrigated acreage) has in-
creased only 37 per cent during
the 1897-1949 period.
As measured by the Egyptian
government, the outstriping of
land utilization by population has
resulted in a 32 per cent decline
in the per capita share of the crop
area. There was .79 acre per per-
son. In terms of crop land avail-
able, modern Egyptians are con-
siderably worse off than their an-
cestors a half-century ago.
One of the most spectacular pro-
jects to remedy the downward
trend of per capita crop area is
the proposed Aswan High Dam,
which would permit cultivation of
an additional two million acres.
However, an Egyptian government
report has pointed out that agri?
cultural benefits of this project
will be "somewhat frustrated" by
the expected five to six million in-
crease in population during the 10
years necessary to build the dam.
About all that can be hoped for
from the High Dam and other de-
velopments planned, the report
said, is that "the rapid fall in the
standard of living will be halted."
According to the Population
Reference Bureau, fertility is like-
ly to remain high in Egypt because
--

large families are a source of
pride among Moslem peoeple -
and Egypt is about nine-tenths
Moslem. The new government has,
however, set up a National Com-
mission for Population Problems
as one of 10 committees imple-
menting the work of a Permanent
Council for Public Welfare Serv-
ices.
The commission's success in
coping with Egypt's population ex-
plosion is likely to have an im-
portant effect on that country's
future. Always in the background
is the temptation - which many
another nation has succumbed to
in the past - to solve the prob-
lem of land scarcity by appropri-
ating that of a neighbor.

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY -8 P.M.
Department of Speech Presents
Christopher Fry's
THE LADY'S NOT FOR BURNIlNG
$1.50--$1.10-75c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

' ,
,,'
L ,!S _, S
K

Store hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:30-5:30

SALINE MILL
THEATRE
US 112--/ Mile West of Saline
"THE PURSUIT OF
HAPPINESS"
Admission $1.65 Curtain 8:30
Telephone Saline 31
for Reservations

what
a wonderful
twosome .

our wool knit
sheath dress
takes a cardigan
.. back to campus, off to
a brilliant career, or
anywhere your busy schedule
demands ... a slender
column of wool needlepoint
topped by its own
cable knit cropped cardigan
jacket. Grey
heather, powder blue, flax
beige or red.
sizes 10 to 18.
39.95

I

I

STUDENTS!

Cotton and You!
Adverised in Mademoiselle
"DINNER CHECK" in wondrous Fabrex cotton and
silk that needs little or no ironing. Its slenderness
blouses lightly above the contour belted back. In
the newest jet colors - brown, grey or black. Sizes
8 to 18.. . by Jerry Gilden at $17.95.
nTCIk ,- ;4'U 1,- 4--- - A -,+-- ir. -;..

\

LEAVE laundry in the Morning
PICK UP in the Afternoon.

I

If Preferred, Do-It-Yourself
In Ohno NnrflU.

II

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