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July 28, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-28

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SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PAt'.19 qWU-V*'

THE MICHIGAN DAINtY A 4~ £ EL~N~W*

Arkr

FROM LIBYA TO 'U'
Brock Acts, Directs Plays
By ADELAIDE WILEY $_ ___ __

Prof. James Brock is, as far a
e knows, the only Michigan Stat
University teacher on leave a yea
to teach here.
Having been at Albion Colleg
F for a whole decade, he decided, "
wanted to get out of smal
schools," And so he began teach
ing in State's speech school las
year, where facilities are larger
besides being national secretary
treasurer of Theta Alpha Phi, na
tional speech fraternity.
This summer he undertook di
rection of two plays on the Uni
;versity speech department's play
bill: "The Circle", which has al-
ready run, and "The Lady's No
For Burning" which opens nex
week.
Taskmaster
Although directing plays "is a
terrible taskmaster," he smiles
letting his dark eyes light up, he
thinks plays have the richest cul.
tural background - "you are deal.
ing with great literature.
"And playwrights represen
some of the greatest thinkers of
all time. From Sophocles to Sartre
you are taking courses in psychol-
ogy, philosophy and literature
and so on."
He does not believe much is
learned from reading plays ir
class. "Drama study is not meani
to be academic."
Using a metaphor that hails
back to his World War II Ai
Force life, Prof. Brock claims
"Merely reading a play is like
looking over an airplane on the
ground. You can figure out what
tmakes it work, but you don't really
know about it, and it won't func-
tion till it's off the ground.
"A play must be exhibited."
Period Plays
About his own preference for
plays: Prof. Brock, who toured
with a professional group before
graduating from Mancheester Col-
lege, studied Period plays, mainly
16th and 17th century.
"I like Shakespeare and com-
pany -lyric drama. And I like the
lyric of music in operas. A friend
of mine at Albion, a music pro-
fessor, wrote usic especially for
me, for 'The Lady's Not For Burn-
ing'," he modestly said in a happy
x tone.
But Prof. Brock's tastes are
Senator Calls
Gov. Williams
Anti-Business
LANSING (A)-Senator Robert
E. Faulkner (R-Coloma), chair-
man of the Senate Business Com-
mittee, came out swinging yester-
day in the third round of his
committee's dispute with Gov. G.
Mennen Williams. .
The committee publicized evi-
dence from businessmen who said
that the governor's tax policies
were driving industry out of
Michigan.
Gov. Williams replied that this
was not so. He said the testimony
was politicaly- inspired and would
give Michigan "a black eye" and
discourage n av enterprises.
"The facts ai- e, Sen, Faulkner
countered, "that the policies of
Gov. Williams are discouraging
business expansions and therefore
1. Job opportuinties, in Michigan.
That was the testimony of many
witnesses before our committee.
"These businessmen are well
aware of the facts and no amount
of window dressing can hide the
sad results of Williams' anti-busi-
ness policies.
"The governor is saying, in
effect," Sen. Faulkner declared.
"Let's sweep the dirt under the

rug and don't let people outside of
Michigan know how bad my anti-
business administration really is."
"Businessmen read the papers,"
Sen Faulkner said. "They know
of Mr. Williams' gradiouse
schemses, which include an Auto-
mation Commission, Atomic En-
ergy Commission and unemploy-
ment benefits that would, in many
cases, make it more profitable to
be unemployed than to work.
"Business fears the Williams'
proposed corporation income tax.
Business fears the Williams' pro-
posal that would increase payroll
taxes, and business fears Williams'
political: ties with the CIO.

;e
.I
t
t
a,
e
t

-Daily-Don Watkins
DRAMA-Prof. Brock says, is "not meant to be academic. It
should be on the stage, and not in the classroom."

End Comes
To Veterans
For GI Bill
An era came to an end at the
University this week when the GI
Bill for World War II veterans ex-
pired.
The great influx of vets that
reached a peak of approximately
11,000 in 1947-48, more than half
of that year's record enrollment,
has dwindled to a mere 104 who
saw their last government checks
this summer.
Some seven or eight will con-
tinue their education at govern-
ment expense under Public Law
190, which continues subsistence
for those who entered the service
between Nov. 1, 1945, and Oct. 31,
1946. The expiration of their bene-
fits depends on their dates of sep-
aration from the service,
For the rest of them it is the
end of their part in a huge govern-
ment subsidy of education which
poured untold amounts of money
into the University. For "plenty
of them," according to University
Supervisor of Veterans Affairs
Mrs. Marjorie G. Uren, the end of
the Bill means hardship in com-
pleting, unfinished educations.
There were about 250 World,
War II vets enrolled in the Uni-
versity during the 1955-56 aca-
demic year, Mrs. Uren reports.
They received tuition, books and
supplies up to $500 per academic
year from the government, plus
subsistence checks of $75, $105 or
$120 a month depending on num-
ber of dependents and outside
earnings. A vet had to be a full-
time student to be eligible for sub-
sistence benefits.
Expiration of Public Law 346
has no tangible effect on Mrs.
Uren's office, which is chiefly con-
cerned with certifying every vet's
enrollment and progress to the
Veterans Adoministration. "There
have been so few in the last few
years," she said, "that it doesn't
make much difference."
Besides, handling the World
War II vets was about one-tentha
as much work as taking care of
the Korean vets attending the
University, she said. Korean vets
enrolled under Public Law 550
must have their enrollment and
progress certified every month in-'
stead of the once a semester for
their predecessors.
But, because the enrollment of
Korean vets has been smaller, Mrs.
Uren's staff now numbers only
five. as compared to a peak of 25
at one time during high enroll-
ments of World War II vets.
Mrs. Uren expects a peak en-
rollment of Korean vets nearing
3,000 for the 1956-57 year. The7
percentage of Korean vets who
take advantage of the Bill, how-
ever is greater, she reported. 1

broad, and he says he enjoys
"producing the unusual, like
(Federico Garcia) Lorca's 'Blood
Wedding'."
He mentions that the sort of
"emotional sensationalism" of
Spanish plays is not appreciated
in America like the dry, arid
works of T. S. Eliot.
"People here get disturbed at
all this raw sensationalism in Lor-
ca and other Spaniards." He adds
thatEliot tried to write restrained
verse, sounding like prose, so no
one would recognize it as differ-
ing from every-day speech.
Verse
"If you're going to have verse,
why not have it sound like verse?"

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

J

Archaeological Expedition
Returns from Near East

ECLASSIFIEDS

(Continued from Page 2)

Battle Creek, Michigany - Teacher
Needs: Debate/English; Physics/Chem-
istry; Elementary.
Dixboro, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary (2nd/3rd combinatalon).
Dundee, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
High School English (English/Speech/
Play Production.)
Fairfield California - Teacher Needs:
High School English; Girls' Physical
Education; Shop/Mechanical Drawing.
Grosse Ile, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
English; (9th/10th grade); Chemistry/
Physics; Commercial (Typing/Business
Law/Gen. Business).
Hazel Park, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
High School Social Studies; English;
Math; Mentally Handicapped; Junior
High Mentally Handicapped.
Hebron, Indiana -- Teacher Needs:
High School Math/Social Studies (man
ufd.)' Elementary (4th, 1st/2nd com-'
bination).
Hopkins, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary (6th).
Highwood, Illinois -- Teacher Needs:
General Science/Social Studies or Ge-
ography or Math or Home Economics
or Wood Shop.
Inkster, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Early Elementary (Kdg.,,lst); 8th Grade
English; 8th Grade Math; High School
Counselor.
Kalamazoo, Michigan--Teacher Needs:
High School English/Spanish; English.
Linden, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementray; Music Director (Instru-
mental/High School Choir); Coach
Head Football, Asst. Basketball, Head
Track, Physical Ed. Classes/Driver
Training).
Marshall, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Junior High English.
Marne, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (2nd, 3rd, 5th).
Midland, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
7th Grade Core; 9th Grade Social Stu-
dies; High School Librarian; Elemen-
tary Librarian; Intermediate Vocal
Music.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, No. 3-1511, Ext.
489.

Prof. Brock says. For him, Lorca is
one of the most successful writers
of verse drama.
Prof. Brock believes actors
should have more experience in
classical drama "because of won-
derful training it affords them."
If performers remain just on
Broadway, he says, they never
deal with the problem of handling
verse, or plays by Moliere, Shakes-
pear, "and so on."
He likes working with plays by
Christopher Fry, too, says, "Fry
does not make his plays sound like
people talking - his verse is
strong and sensuous."
During his Air Force years, Prof.
Brock supervised shows and enter-
tainment in Libya and southern
Italy. He dealt with people like
Jack Benny, Bryan Herne, Kath-
erine Cornell, Joe E. Brown.
He enjoys teaching, working
with people, says also, "I like
this university."
Prof. Morley
Gets Fullriight
Prof. D. E. Morley, associate
professor of speech and speech
clinician for the Speech Clinic,
has been awarded a Fulbright
Scholarship for the academic year'
1956-57.
Assigned to the department of
the Medical School, University of
Oslo, Norway, Prof. Morley will
lecture in speech pathology and
will have clinical practice with
cerebral palsy children. He will
also train clinical assistants in
methods of speech correction, and
will direct and supervise speech
therapy in outlying areas.
Prof. Morley first joined the
University faculty in 1946 as an
instructor' and hearing clinician.
He graduated from Michigan State
Normal College in 1933 and re-
ceived his M.A. from the Univer-
sity in 1939.
Organization
Notices
Big Little Sister Tea, given by the
junior nurses for the Sophomore nurses
on July 31, 7:00 p.m., Couzen Assem-
bly Room.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Mr. Zaw Win and Mr. Kyaw Myint will
speak on "Experiences in Buddhism",
Sunday, July 29, 7:00 p.m., Guild House,
524 Thompson,
* **
Episcopal Student Foundation: Pic-
nic, July 29, 4:00 p.m.; cars will leave
from Canterbury House.

A University archaeological re-
connaissance expedition has just
returned from the Near East where
it was sent to study the possibility
of re-opening a University research
in that area.
'T.e expedition which left last
April after a year of careful plan-
ning, was a continuation of a long-
term commitment in the Near
East, Prof. George H. Forsyth, Jr.,
chairman of the Department of
Fine Arts at the University and
head of the expeditions, says-
The University's field work in
the Near East, he explains, goes
back to Prof. Francis W. Kelsey,
for whom the University Archae-
ology Museum is named Excava-
tions were made in this section of
the world up until World War II,
but after this period the expedi-
tions were never resumed, Prof.
Forsyth says. Two years ago the'
University appointed a committee
to look into the situation in the
Near East.
Members of the expedition were
Prof. Oleg Grabar of the depart-
ment of fine arts and department
of near eastern studies. Prof.
George E. Mendenhall. associate
in the department of near eastern
studies; George Tchalenko, archi-
tect of the French Institute in
New Semitic
Language Told
Recovery of a new Semitic lan-
guage was reported yesterday at
the annual meeting of the Linguis-
tic Society of America.
Prof. Ignace J. Gelb of the Uni-
versity of Chicago told of excava-
tions in Mesopotamia andeSyria
that have uncovered evidence of
a great number of desert people
who bore names having the great-
est importance in reconstructing
the ethnic situation of the ancient
Near East.
These people, Amorites, had a,
language of their own, Prof. Gelb
said. They invaded the "Fertile
Crescent" about 2,000 B.C. and
established a new dynasty of which
Hammurapi was a member, he
said.
Discovery of these ancient people
was "very recent," Prof. Gelb add-
ed, indicating that further study
will be of value to both languists
and ethpic anthropologists.
A total of 23 papers are being
presented at the two-day meeting,
distributed over five sessions. Prof.
Myles Dillon of the Royal Irish
Academy in Dublin delivered the
main address at yesterday's dinner
meeting, discussing comparative
Indo-European languages.
The Society is currently spon-
soring the University's summer
Linguistics Institute.

Beirut; Fred Anderegg, supervisor
of Photographic Services, and
Prof. Forsyth.
The expedition started in Beirut,
continued on to Damascus and
Palmayra on the Euphrates, across
to Bagdad and then up to Mosul
on the Tigris.
The next stop for the expedi-
tion was the region just below
Lake Van in Eastern Turkey, an
area unexplored by an previous
University expedition, and then
back to Beirut.
Art Exhibition
Will Be Held
At Rackliam
The second annual Michigan
Art Exhibitiaon opens Monday in
the Rackham Building galleries.
Some 175 of the State's amateur
painters will exhibit their work
in the show which will be on dis-
play through August 12. The show
is sponsored by the University
Summer Session and the Exten-
sion Service. The paintings are
for the most part selected from
regional >ih;ws held earlier this
year.
A special crnference on Monday
v.ill be a feature of the openirg.
It will inhlude demonstrations in
painting, a gallery talk, and a
showing of <iL, dealing with the
work of sew-ral famous painters.
Monday s program begins with
registration from 9:30 to 10 a.m.
Following regi 4ration Harold M.
Dorr, dean of Outstate Education,
will welcome the conferees on be-
half of the University in a Rack-
ham Amphitheatre assembly.
Robert Iglehart, chairman of the
University Department of Art, will
speak on "The Community a§
Artist."
At 2 p.m. Frank Cassara, assist-1
ant professor of drawing and1
painting, will demonstrate oil
painting in the Architecture Audi-
torium. William A. Lewis, tech-
nical illustrator at the Willow Run
Technical Research Center will
demonstrate water color tech-
niques.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 '1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Small black dog, red collar with
license Hill St. Near Onondaga, NO
3-3696 Evenings. Reward.)A
LOST-Pansy Cluster Pin, crossing cam-
pus. Reward. NO 2-6530. Dorothy Ave-
rill. )A
LOST-Black change purse in the Uni-
versity High School, second floor. Call
NO 3-2929. Reward. )A
WANTED TO RENT
GRADUATE STUDENT-Would like to
rent a room or an apartment as of
September. Prefers that it be close to
campus. If interested, write Louis J.
Pansky, 2470 N. 50th St. Milwaukee,
Wisconsin. )L
HELP WANTED
"HOUSE PARENT, male, 23 years or
over, part time. Board, room. Salary
depends on hours available. Work
about 25 hours per week. Excellent
experience for social work, psycho-
logy or education major. Location 40
minutes from University. Children's
Village, 26645 W. Six Mile Road, De-
troit, KE 1-4060." )H
ASSISTANT TO NURSERY TEACHER
Mon., Wed., and Fri. mornings next
fall. Beth Israel Nursery, NO 2-6188.
)H3
WAITRESS OR WAITER-part time.
Evenings and/or weekends. Call in
person at the Virginian, 313 S. State.
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. }D
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156. )S

4U 1 V5 agnrenaw
"BILLY THE KID"
in color
with Robert Taylor
"TAPROOTS"
with
Susan Hayward, Yon Heflin

FOR SALE
1948 PLYMOUTH two door. Best offer.
Call NO 8-7781 after 5 p.m. )B
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J

;.
d
t t'
' ' T?'-3-1_ _
T1

SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered,
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
TYPING: Theses, term papers. etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service.
830 South Main, NO 8-7590.
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
for two. Call NO 8-7230.?t
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SALINE MILL
THEATRE
US 112--%2 mile west of Saline

"THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS"
Lawrence Langner's Comedy
ADMISSION TONIGHT $2.20 - SUNDAY $1.65
Curtain 8:30 - For Reservations Call Saline 31
See the Exciting Male Art Gallery ,

DIAL NO 2-2513
Saturday and Sunday
Continuous Shows
From 1 P.M.
Ending Tonight
IN
HIS
FIRST
WESTERN!
THEATRE a-a, qut,
STARTING
SUNDAY
UFE-
TNILLOB

6588 Jackson Rd.
''TREASURE OF PANCHO VILLA"
in color
-----also----
"JOHNNY STOOLPIGEON"
with TONY CURTIS

i
i
_

I I

I

TONIGHT at 8
Department of Speech Presents
THE WAYWARD SAINT
PAUL VINCENT CARROLL'S COMIC-FANTASY
"An Irish romp!" - HAWKINS, N.Y. World-Telegram
$1.50 -$1.10- 75c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

-

f1

I

1

.L.... fl
* MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.
serg 0NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
the NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
,' 1108 South University
campus * PACKARD-BROCKMAS
1923 Packard
area . WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.
STUDENT
ORGANIZATIONS ..
'te There are literally hundreds o
student organizations at the Uni
versity. And you'd be surprised
how many of them use the facilitie
of Ann Arbor Bank. If you or your
? f :group are considering a barnkoc
[. count for your organization-why
not bring it to your convenient
friendly Ann Arbor Bank?
-.
Pte" v
4 ~ ni

N
of
-
!d
S~a
r
-

DIAL NO 2-3136
LATE SHOW
TON IGHT AT I I P.M.

PERSONNEL INTERVIEW: Breakfast followed by talk by Dr. E 1%LItE "I" M 1PC41I IM A R B O RBK^V m
A representative from the following Ronald Lippitt, July 29, 9:00 a.m., Can- ____ ___ ___ i.Y
will be at the Engrg. School: Mon., terbury House.
July 30: * * *
Muskegon Piston Ring Co., Muskegon, Lutheran Student Association: Sup-
Mich. - any degree level in any pro- per, July 29, 6:00 p.m.. followed by
gram of engineering except Municipal program at 7:00 p.m., Lutheran Student '- . .r.. . ...
or Nuclear for Engine Test Section, Chapel. Dr. Frank Hutnley of the Eng- }. ., . :.3.
Engrg. Dept. lish Dept. will be the speaker. 4 a"
For appointments contact the Engrg. * * * '
Placement Office, 347 W. Engrg., ext. Hillel Foundation: Supper Club, July
37.29, 6:00 p.m., illel,{ . . , " rrr{
S\. tr{'}
?a . .... .. J...
:\ ". ,ntii:'.' ' ,4i ' ~ "w . u
,}yam
5tt
'We are in the new storeis
but aassoocia/es"o.d "assoc. --es"

JACKSON MOTOR
SPEEDWAY
STOCKCAR
RACES

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