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June 26, 1956 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-06-26

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MjCttl6AA JDAILY

I l DA V, 3 CNE 26, 1956

likE MiChI6A~~ INAILY 'f Uk~SDAY, JUNE £6, )1~.6

ASSISTANT DEAN:
Proffitt Named To Law School Staff

Medical Book (enter

A complete stock of Medical,
Nursing and Public Health Books.
Supplies for the professional
school student.

Roy Franklin Proffitt has been
appointed associate professor of
law and assistant dean of the Law
School effective July 1.
Prof. Proffitt is now on sabbati-
cal leave from the University of
Missouri School of Law and is en-
rolled in the Law's Schools gradu-
ate program. A 1948 graduate of
the University Law School, he has
been on the Missouri faculty since
1949.
As assistant dean, Prof. Proffitt
will assume the duties now per-
formed by the secretary of the
Law School and the position of
secretary will not be continued.
Law School Dean E. Blythe Sta-
son explained that the term "sec-
retary" as used in the past has
been antiquated by increasing ad-
ministrative problems. "Adminis-
trative duties have increased in
scope beyond just those of a secre-

tary to the faculty," he comment-
ed. "This move is merely the
adoption of a more modern pat-
tern."
Duties of the new assistant dean
include the scheduling of classes,
preparation of the Law School's
informational publications, handl-
ing registration and classification
and maintaining contact with stu-
dents regarding their special pro-
grams.
In addition Prof. Proffitt will
assume the administration of the
scholarship program now handled
by the chairman of the Faculty
Scholarship Committee, look after
such student activities as the Stu-
dent Bar Association and the Case
Clubs, and give assistance to the
dean in the preparation of re-
ports, answering routine corres-
pondence and similar assignments.

Overbeck Bookstore

-1

1216 S. University Ave.

Phone NO. 3-4436

ROY F. PROFFITT
... Law School Ass't Dean

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WELCOME' STUDENTS, WE'VE
Deliberately planned to make the
most of your summer

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ot the sele
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121/2 to 24
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resses
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Exciting styles and mate-
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sparkling new cotton and
drip-dry fabbric collec-
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These are dresses for
office or class, dresses
for those summer plays,
dates, dances and picnics.
Come in and see for
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DAY AND NIGHT
CLASSES STARTING
TYPING OPTIONAL
Over, 400 schools will assist you in review or placement. Uses ABC's.
ENROLL TODAY
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State & Williams Sts.
Why Deny Yourself the
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DEVELOPED FILMS-Technician watches films being run behind
window a "U" Microfilm plant.
U MicrofilminGives
Efficient Reproduction

Technicians
Teach Radio
By JERRY DeMAAGD
The radio telescope development
sponsored jointly by the electrical
engineering and astronomy de-
partments is getting underway
rapidly, Prof. Fredrick T. Haddock,
project director, commented re-
cently.
-Tie purpose of the project will
be to train graduate students in
radio astronomy," he said.
A new radio telescope with 8.
28 foot antenna costing $28,000
has been placed on order by the
University. The site for the Large
telescope has not yet been pro-
cured, but is expected to be "within
15 minutes drive from the cam-
pus,~
Finances for the project were
appropriated by the Office of
Naval Research in Washington, D.
C.. Prof. Haddock reported. Now
an assistant professor in the as-
tronomy and electrical engineering
departments. Prof. Haddock came
to the University this year from
the Office of Naval Research where
he had worked with radio tele-
scopes since 1946.
Radio astronomy started with
the discovery of radio waves from
t he galaxies by Karl Jansky of
Bell Teilephone Laboratories in
1932, he noted.
"It really gained its impetus at
the end of World War II with in-
vestigation into radio waves anct
radio physics" he said.
The sun and the planet Jupiter
are particularly "noisy" giving out
great bursts of radio waves, Had-
dock said. A great new class of
celestial bodies of strange radio
waves emitting clouds of gas
among the stars that are very
turbulent have been discovered he
said
The milky way was first proved
to be a spiral galaxy by radio tele-
believed that many radio stars are
copy, he continued, and it Is
beyond the range of any optical
instrument,
"We will study the sun first in
cooperation with the McMath-Hu:-
bert Observatory," he said, "and
after that the galaxy."
Haddock, who now teaches a
course in radio astronomy for
graduates, -stronomy 299, pointed
out that some of the practical
applications of the studies may
help to predict radio and television
fade outs by reference to the radio
signal activity of the sun.
'U Gives Million
In Scholarships,
University students received $1,-
048,665.50 in scholarships and fel-
lowships last year, according to
Dean of Men Walter B. Rea,
chairman of the Scholarship Com-
mittee.

MIX AND MATCH---a
wonderful summer in our
skirts, blouses-Bermuda
Short - Slacks, Jackets,
Shorts, Tee shirts all here
in a wonderful array of
prints, bold stripes and
subdued shades - all at
popular prices.

The Budget
from 8
Better D
from 1

For a carefree summer,
choose cur wonderful
no-iron cotton undies.
Petticoats from 2.95,
slips 3.95, Shortgowns
and P'Js from 4.95.
Brunchies from 5.95.
-.

By JIM SMITH
In a fairly old part of Ann Arbor.
is a surprisingly modern building
which houses an even more sur-
prisingly unique and interesting
organization, University Micro-
films.
The object of this private organ-
ization is to supply academic ma-
terial in microfilm form. Univer-
sity Microfilms was founded in
1938 by Eugene B. Power, a pres-
ent Regent of the University, and
performs microfilming services ex-
clusively, using the finest and most
modern equipment available.
Power visited Europe in 1939 for
the purpose of setting up micro-
film centers so that microfilm
copies of material of European li-
braries could be made available.
University Microfilms now has an
office in London and also has mi-
crofilming cameras on the Conti-
nent.
Cheap Reproductions
Microfilming is a means of ob-
taining one copy of a reproduction
cheaply. The cost of making a sin-1
gle copy by any other method is
much greater.
The organization now publishes
two-thirds of the doctoral disser-
tations written each year in this
country. A microfilm copy of any
dissertation may be purchased by
any interested person from this or-
ganization.
A person writing one may have
it microfilmed and kept in the

vault of this fireproof building.
In order that the public be kept
informed of what dissertations
have been written, every month
there is published "Dissertation
Abstracts," 4 guide to dissertations
and monographs which are avail-
able in microfilms. This magazine
contains abstracts of the latest dis-
sertations that have been copied
on microfilm.
Perfect Lighting
Microfilm copies are made by
photographing the original article
under perfect lighting conditions
on a continuous reel of film. This
film is then developed under auto-
matically controlled time and tern-
perature conditions in a huge de-
veloping tank,
From this negative film positive
film prints are made for use in
reading machines which may be
found in most libraries. The nega-
tive film is then stored in the fire-
proof vault, where it is kept under
conditions which give the film life
equal to that of rag paper.
At the present time, University
Microfilm is working on the proj-
ect of putting on microfilm all
English books which were printed
before 1640. This organization also
is microfilming over 1,100 period-
icals.
The University Microfilms has
developed a printing process for
making full color prints at one
quarter the cos, of other color
processes.

At Our

Campus Toggery
1111 South U.
2 blocks from
Main Shop
On Forest off S.U.

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SO-O
%%4'o//* rfeShing

W ELCOME!I

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Old and New Friends

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ho r ts

YOU'LL FIND EVERYtHING HERE
YOU NEED.FORYOUR ,
SUMMER STAY IN ANN ARBOR

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Drink in the cool drama of tee shirts and
shorts from Jacobson's! Top to bottom:
Bold stripes on a long-sleeve bateau top
in black/turquoise, aqua/turquoise,
pink/fuchsia or black/camel. $3
Corduroy shorts: black, red, white, gold
moss, turquoise. $3
Sleeveless turtle-reck tee is black, turquoise,
maize, beige, or white. $2
Bermudas in tarpoon cloth, authentically
Black Watch, Skene, or MacDonald
plaid or black/white. 7.95
Short-sleeve boat-neck
top in white combined with
black, aqua, maize, beige or
Y; red. $3
Cotton twill shorts are navy,
green, or white. $3
Tee shirts, S, M, L;
shorts 10 to 18.

Our Sports Shop Teems Kith Pretty Things!

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SWEATERS
* SHORTS
tSHIRTS *

* SKIRTS
BLOUSES
'EDAL-PUSHERS

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As always, besides the fine quality, you'll
enjoy our uniformly fair prices

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