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July 14, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-14

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THE MICHTGA.N DAILY

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D OR SUBTRACT ROOMS:
Unistrut Buildings Prove Useful

-Daily-Hal Leeds
UNISTRUT--The new Architectural Research Laboratory will be dedicated at 11 a.m. tomorrow
when University President Harlan H. Hatcher formally receives the building from Charles W. Att-
wood, president of"the Unistrut Corporation which sponsored rresearch leading to the lab's develop-
ment and donated materials for its construction.

Layoff Plan
Requires No
Law Change
LANSING () - No change is
needed in the state law to make
the new layoff plan contained in
recent contracts between the CIO
United Auto Workers and Ford
and General Motors effective in
Michigan, an Attorney General's
opinion held yesterday.
Atty. Gen. Thomas M. Kavanagh
said that the auto industry con-
tract for supplemental unemploy-
ment benefits paid by the em-
ployer do not conflict with the
present state unemployment bene-
fits compensation law.
He further held that employers
should not be required to con-
tribute more to the state unem-
ployment compensation fund be-
cause of the layoff plan.
Atty. Gen. Kavanagh specified
that he did not pass on the ques-
tion of whether an employer would
have to contribute more under the
federal law.
No Conflict
"We find that the present law
does not conflict with the con-
tracts," Atty. Gen. Kavanagh said.
"If the legislature wants to spell
it out specifically, however, it
might be a good idea."
Atty. Gen. Kavanagh hinged his
opinion on a section of the law
which defines renumeration.
Idle workers are forbidden to re-
ceive remuneration from an em-
ployer without deduction from
their state unemployment com-
pensation.
Atty. Gen. Kavanagh said the,
law defines remuneration as "com-
pensation paid for personal serv-
ices."
He said the new UAW contract
layoff plan is not paid for per-
forming personal services so it can
not be considered remuneration.
He also noted that payments to
employes for termination of work,
separation, severance or dismissal
allowances are not remuneration
under the terms of the present
law.
Governor's Statement
In Gov. G. Mennen Williams'
absence, the executive office issued
a statement quoting him as saying
that since the contracts do not
become effective until next year
there will be ample time to con-
sider if there is any need for legis-
lative action.
Gov. KWilliams had asked for the
opinion on the matter.
The layoff plan becomes effect-
ive July 1, 1956.
Under the UAW contracts with
Ford and General Motors, the em-
ployer contributes five cents an
hour per employe to a trust fund
to be used to supplement state un-
employment compensation finan-
ced by an employer tax.

Clay Cargo
Unloading
Not Settled
MILWAUKEE (P)-Tihe Milwau-
kee Common Council voted yes-
terday to notify the owners of the
Norwegian freighter Divina that
the city "cannot and will not guar-
antee" the unloading of a clay car-
go for the strike-troubled Kohler
Co.
t Mayor Frank Zeidler indicated
at once that he would probably
veto the action. He said he could
not permit the council to breach
what he considered a valid con-
tract with the owners of the Divi-
na.
By a 17 to 11 vote, the council
overturned the recommendation of
its building grounds and- Harbor
Committee that it reaffirm a ver-
bal commitment inviting to the
ship owners to unload. the clay
cargo here despite a threat of
picketing.
The aldermen adopted a substi-
tute resolution by Aldernan Matt
Schimenz directing that, irrespec-
tive of the'mayor and Milwaukee
Harbor Commission's commitment
for the Divina to use port facilties
here, the city notify the owners
that it "cannot and will not guar-
antee" the unloading of the boat.
Many points are in contention
between the Kohler Company, and
the union, most of theme embraced
in charges of unfair labor practi-
ces against the firm presently be-
fore the National Labor Relations
Board. A hearing on these charges
has been recessed until July 20.

a

NORTH CAMPUS -- A hilltop view of North Campus construction
shows two modern structures, only one so far completed besides
the Library Stack Building. On the left is the Cooley Memorial
Building, and on the right is the recently dedicated Phoenix
Memorial Laboratory.
Ground Observer Corps
Three Years Old Today

beams or trusses shaped like in-
verted pyramids whose diagonals
are four feet, one inch long, the
same length as the sides of the
top of the inverted pyramid.
Third Dimension Added
This gives a third dimension to
roofs and floors, providing almost
three feet between the top of the
inverted pyramid and the bottom.
When used for ceilings, lights may
be placed between the roofing on
the top and a translucent material
fitted into the square frames on
the bottom, resulting in indirect
lighting.
Since all the "Unistruts" in the
space-frame are the same length,
they are interchangeable. They are
held together by connecting plates
located at the intersections of the
horizontal struts. The horizontal
struts are both at the top and at
the bottom of the diagonal struts,
so that one could say the pyr4-
mids were not inverted, depending
on his point of view.
The result of this kind of con-
struction from standardized parts
is simplicity in building and an
effectiveness that allows the
space-frame roof to absorb loads
far in excess of the strength of its
individual parts.
Space-Framer Not Sold
The space-frames are not avail-

able on the market yet, pending
complete results of research such
as that carried on in the building
of the new Architectural Lab. The
straight struts for walls are mar-
keted and have been used for years
for making items smaller than
buildings-such as tables, coat
racks and shelving.,
The new lab has two space-
frame structures. One forms the
roof framework and measures 90
feet by 70 feet. A part of it is cov-
ered by conventional roofing, and
two other parts have experimental
roofings donated by manufactur-
ers for the specific purpose of
testing their products. One is a
fiber-glass insulative roofing that
filters the sunlight into the build-
ing.
The other space-frame, 33 feet
by 49 feet, is the floor framework,
the foundation of the building.
Shelter Projects
The roof frame extends beyond
the building itself and is supported
by two outdoor columns. Its pur-
pose is to shelter architectural ex-
periments conducted outside.
Though called a two-story build-
ing, the new lab is technically on-
ly a one-story building with a mez-
anine, according to Prof. C. Theo-

dore Larson of the architecture
and design college. Prof. Larson
headed the research team that.de-
vised and built the lab.
The next such building will be
a school building in Wayne for
which plans have already been
completed. Low-cost school hous-
ing was one of the objectives be-
hind the initiating of the Archi-
tectural Lab project.
French Club
Plans Holiday
Today the French celebrate their
national holiday.
Students on campus will be given
an opportunity to commemorate
the July 14th storming of the Bas-
tille at 8:30 p.m. today.
Le Cercle Francais is sponsoring
a party at 902 Baldwin for all who
wish to observe the French coun-
terpart of our own Fourth of
July.
A skit and dancing will be fea-
tured during the evening's enter-
tainment and there will also be
a contest to select "Miss Bastille.'
Anyone wishin gto compete for the
title must attend ) the festivities
prepared to render a song in
French.
Admission is $1.00 per person
and everyone is welcome to attend.

COLORADO SPRINGSA
erationo Skywatch expands into
a nationwide organization on itsj
third anniversary today.
Skywatch operates through half
a million airplane spotters who'
scan the skies for unidentified-
and possibly hostile-aircraft.
These compose the Ground Ob-
servers Corps, a part of the Con-
tinental Airi Defense Command
which has its headquarters here.
Heretofore a round-the-clock
Skywatch in that region had not
been considered necessary because
the primary-and until recently
the only-serious threat was from
the north.
Russian advances in production
of long-range aircraft h a v e
changed all that. Maps in the
CADC combat operations center
now show Soviet capability to
sneak down from the niorth far out
Driver Just Likes
To Visit Friends
DETROIT (A-Clover West got
a 30-day House of Correction sen-
tence for reckless driving today.
He explained to the court why
he led a policeman on a foot race
through a number of apartment
houses and back yards and over
fences after his car hit another.
"I knew a lot of friends in the
buildings and was just trying to
borrow some money to pay the
damages," West said.

at sea, both in the Atlantic and the
Pacific, and to swing around
through the gulfs of Mexico and
California to unleash surprise
atomic attacks from the south.

INDIA ART SHOP
jfimorferi4
330 MAYNARD STREET
New shipment of
MOROCCAN HANDBAGS
and HASSOCKS 9
also
Complete line of
Spanish Jewelry
Si -I

.d

7

SAN ANTONIO LIKELY:
Fight Seen Among Top Cities
For Air Force Academy Site

a
I

WASHINGTON (R)-A revived
fight among cities seeking the pro-
posed Air Force Academy was
seen as a possibility yesterday by
Rep. Kilday (D-Tex), a member
of the House Armed Services Com-
mittee.t
However, the Air Force said it
had no plans or intentions of mak-
ing a change in the site of the
academy.
The committee said in report-
ing the appropriation bill that no
more funds should be spent on the
academy until the Defense De-
partment has definitely settled its
plans for the proposed academy
and coordinated it with proposed
expansion of Ft. Carson in the
Colorado Springs area. The House
debates the bill tomorrow.
Rep. Kilday said the question
has arisen as to the adequacy of
water supplies for all of the pro-

posed defense requirements in the
Colorado Springs area.
"There is a possibility that the
academy will not be built in Colo-
rado Springs," Rep. Kilday told
a reporter.
"In this event, there undoubt-
edly would be a wide open fight
again for selection of a site for
the Air Academy. Naturally, I
would then do my best to get it in
the San Antonio vicinity."
He said he knew nothing about
rumors Air Force Secretary Har-
old Talbott might resign, leading
to a removal of objections to selec-
tion of San Antonio as a site for
the academy. An Air Force Aca-
demy selection board had rated
San Antonio among the top most
suitable sites, but Talbott report-
edly had said that he did not think
it should go there. Later Colorado
Springs was selected.
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