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July 09, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-09

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FOUR

THE MCHIGAN DAILY'

SATURDAY,'JMY'O, I

FOUR TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. JThY 9.

-,

Harrison Pans Book Saying'
Marlowe Was 'Shakespeare'

The University's authority on
William Shakespeare has criticized
a book that attempts to prove that
Christopher Marlowe authored the
world-famous plays of the English
bard:
Prof. G. B. Harrison of the Eng-
lish department writes in the new
issue of Saturday Review, "Until
(Calvin Hoffman, the author,) can
produce some definite and verifi-
able evidence that someone saw
Marlowe alive after May 30, 1593,
his case for Marlowe's authorship
Panel To Talk
On Grammar
"Grammar in the Classroom"
will be the topic of a panel discus-
sion at 4 p.m. Monday in Auditor-
ium C, Angell Hall.I
Gertrude Overton, Pontiac High
School, Mildred Britton, Sturgis
High School, and Lawrence Niblett,
Cooley High School, Detroit, will
be on the panel.
Prof. A. K. Stevens of the
English department will chair the
discussion.
The panel will discuss the use-
fulness of grammar for developing
skill in language and its effect
on student composition. What can
be profitably taught about langu-
age structure and the means of
diminishing the gap between lin-
guistic knowledge and classroom
teaching will also be considered.
Following the panel, there willI
be a question period

of Shakespeare's plays is not worth
examination."
Hoffman's book, entitled "The
Murder of the Man Who Was
'Shakespeare'" is being analyzed
in the review by Prof. Harrison.
Hoffman's thesis is that Marlowe
"must haye" written the plays we
call Shakespeare's.
Prof. Harrison takes issue with
the thesis, and concludes that
similarities between the poetry of
Shakespeare and the poetry of
other men of the 17th century
are the result of a "Magnificent
Race of Borrowers," where a cer-
tain amount of plagiarism was fre-
quent.
Prof. Harrison is the editor of
"Shakespeare's Tragedies" and
other books, and teaches an under-
graduate and two graduate courses
on the study of Shakespeare at the
University.
Saline Mill Play
A romantic comedy based on a
story by D. H. Lawrence will be
the second dramatic offering of
the Saline Mill Theatre.
"You Touched Me!" by Ten-
nessee Williams and Donald Wind-
ham will open at the Theatre at
8 p.m. Tuesday, and will play
through July 24.
Directed by Ted Heusel and
produced by Barbara Hamel, the
production is' scheduled for a two
week run. Nancy Born, Gillian
Connable, Earl Matthews and Wil-
liam Taylor are featured perform-
ers in the play.

Wisconsin
Professor
To Lecture
Two lectures and a panel dis-
cussion will be presented Tuesday
by the women's physical education
department as part of the Educa-
tion Week Conference.
Prof. Ruth Glasson of the
University of Wisconsin's physical
education department will be guest
lecturer. Prof. Glassow directs. re-
search at the University of Wis-
consin in physical education.
According to Prof. Elizabeth A.
Ludwig of the physical education
department, Prof. GlassoW is a
specialist in the field of motor
learning (use of the muscles).
The first lecture, entitled "Need-
ed Research in Physical Educa-
tion," will be given in Waterman
Gymnasium at 8 a.m.
Another lecture at 10 a.m. in
Barbour Gymnasium will feature
the topic "What the Classroom
Teacher Can Do to Help Children
Improve Their Motor Skills."
At 3:15 p.m. a panel discussion
on "Trends in Research in Motor
Learning and Their Implications
for the Physical Education Teacher
and Athletic Coach" will be pre-
sented in the Women's Athletic
Building. Prof. Glassow will be
keynote speaker.
Members of the panel will be
Dr. Margaret Bell, chairman of the
women's physical education de-
partment, Prof. Robert Dixon of
the education school, Nelson Leh-
ston, director of physical education
and athletics at University High
School and Prof. Esther E. Pease.,

171 r

4

N.

E

TS

C H E C K I N C S O U V E N I R S - Mrs Ivy Baker Priest, Treasurer of the United States.
inspects gallery of pictures she has collected, showing her activities in and out of Washington.

FRAGRANT CARPET - Bystanders admire floral
portrait of St. Peter in street of Genzano, Italy. Floral decoration
of town is an annual celebration dating back to X779.

I.1

Come

to Church

Sunday

- .. " I

FIRST METHODIST' CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wongdohl,
Eugene A; Ransom, Ministers
9,00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship. "Can Final Real-
ity Be Personal."
2:30 P.M. Meet at Wesley Foundation for infor-
mal picnic outing. Swimming, volleyball, picnic
supper and Vespers.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Junior Church in Douglas Chapel at 10:45 a m.
At the morning service at 10:45 a.m. Dr. Parr
will preach on the subject "The Exciting Com-
monplace."
The Student Guild will meet in the Mayflower
Room at 7:00 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Whit-
ney, recently returned missionaries from Af-
rica, will speak on "The Gospel of the Plow
in Portugal, East Africa."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: "Loving God
For His Own Sake."
9:45 A.M.--Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M., Congregational Church, Mr. and Mrs.
Gilbert Whitney of Ann Arbor, guest speakers:
"The Gospel of The Plow in Portuguese East
Africa, in story and pictures.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and S. Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
6:00 P.M. Supper - Program Following.
Speaker: Dr. Frank Huntley, Prof. of Eng-
lish University of Michigan.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M. "Development of the Lu-
theran Church in America"-Dr. Yoder.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Sundays at 8:30 P.M. Theme: "Creativity in the
Arts."
July 10-Panel: Jessie Forsythe, Forsythe Gal-
lery. Panel Discussion on: "Creativity in Point-
ing and Sculpture."

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephonou
9:30-Matins Service.
10:30-Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon
12:00-English Sermon.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Sunday-10:00 A.M.-Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.-"Strength Through Prayer."
7:00 P.M. Evening Service. "One Thing Thou
Lackest."
Wednesday-7:30-Prayer Meeting.
We extend a cordial welcome to each of yoy.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev, C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
9:45-Student Class Studies.
11:00-Worship Service.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CHAPEL
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Worship Services --9:15 and 11:00 Sermon -
"Three Things We Cannot Escape." Second
in a series: "Death." Dr. Kuizenga speaking.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M. - 11.00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M. %
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, and 11 A M. and 8 P.M.
Wednesday 7:00 A.M., Friday 12:10.
There will be no official programs for Canterbury
during the summer.

L E I S U R E P L E A S U R E- A British reservist steps out
into space from a military plane over the Salisbury Plain during
weekend training with a parachute regiment.

B E N C A L S' S E N S A T I 0 N -- Al Kaline, 20-year-old Detroit Tigers outfielder, saya
he isn't superstitious-these shoes have toes cut out because he's breaking in new ones. Al grew
a h ifu!meilt ai gi dn ZO r.20v.ds since last season and is a greatly improved hitter.

'4l

4

R 0 Y A L T 0 U C H - Princess Margaret, pistol in. hand
and a helmet-like bonnet perched atop her head, prepares to
start 196 runners in annual marathon race from Windsor Castle
iu London's Chiswick Stadium. Run was won3byRAF Sergeant.

STARTINC TRUCK S E R V I C E BY R A I L- Truck trailers are lashed aboard
new filat cars at Pennsylvania Railroad freightyard in Kearny, N. J., for rail-trailer service to
Chicago. A similar train carrying about 100 loaded trailers runs from Chicago to New York..

;lr

,p
4.
1;
V

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-8:00 - 10:00 - 11:30
Daily--7:00 - 8:00.
Novena Devotions - Wednesday evenings 7:30
P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lon Hall

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