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June 21, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-06-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICWIGAN DAILY
Polio Victims May Become Addicted
To Mechanical Breathing Apparatus

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Polio patients confined to a
respirator tank may become ad-
dicted to the apparatus, accord-
ing to polio specialists Dr. James
L. Wilson and Dr. David G. Dick-
inson of the University Respirator
Center.
Dr. Wilson pointed out that all
but a few victims of respiratory
paralysis can be freed from the
tank respirator, except for brief
periods.
"Prisoners"
The specialist calls patients who
have come to depend on an iron
lung "prisoners." Most patients
with respiratory paralysis who
have survived the first two weeks
of polio, can be freed from the
tank within a few months, he
said.
Liberation from an Iron lung
does not mean a patient is com-
pletely free from all mechanical
aids to respiration. Dr. Wilson re-
ports that some patients sleep in
a lung at night, others are shifted
over to portable chest respirators
or rocking beds.

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Afraid To Leave

HEST RESPIRATOR: No longer a "prisoner" of an iron lung this poliomyelitis patient breathes
ith the aid of a plastic chest respirator.
.f

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7E

Coop Houses
Offer Room,
Coed Board
Inexpensive board or' room and
board at six student-run co-oper-
ative houses is still available for
the summer.
Members of the Inter-Coopera-
tive Council, the houses include
Nakamura and Owen for men,
Stevens for undergraduate wom-
en, Osterweil for graduate women
and Lester for undergrad and
grad women.
While men's houses serve only
male boarders, the girls' houses
have both men and women
boarders.
Boarders pay about eight dol-
lars a week and work four or five
hours in the co-op.
Membership is completely open,
without racial or religious bias.
The ICC is student owned and op-
erated, with each member wield-
ing one vote. Applications are be-
ing accepted at the ICC office at
1017 Oakland. %
Mrs. Hall Dies
Elizabeth D. Hall, 93 years old,
widow of Dr. Louis P. Hall, pro-
fessor emeritus of the dental
school, died Sunday night at her
home after a two months' illness.

Dr. Wilson feels, that, for the
most part, patients become afraid
of leaving the tank thinking they
won't be able to breathe.
Both doctors observed that
"Many patients have given up
real hope and have retreated to a
life almost of infantalism where
they have no great desire to get
out of the....pachine. "
The University Respirator Cen-
ter has been in operation for
three years with a minimum ca-
pacity at one time of 20 pa-
tients. Since its opening more
than 80 patients have been dis-
charged.

College Stu

d

Of Language
Reeaie

S
I

Something is being done to help
high school students who want to
continue their foreign language
stuc'y in college without repeating
courses, according to Prof. Otto
G. Graf of the German depart-
ment.
This is because a special state-
wide committee is being estib-
lished through Prof. Graf's ef-
forts, to set a single standard of
proficiency throughout the state.
The committee will reexamine
class methods of instruction and
teaching materials as well as de-
vise tests which will be accepted
state-wide, he declares.
Aim To Improve
"It's discouraging to a student
to find himself forced to repeat
work he's already had in high
school, or another college," Prof.
Graf remarked, "and it is our aim
to eliminate the hit and miss,
methods of testing students be-
fare placing them in courses."

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RU AS
READ AND USE DAISY CLASIFIEDS

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WELCOME

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Old and New

Friends

YOU'LL FIND EVERYTHING HERE
YOU NEED FOR YOUR
SUMMER STAY, IN ANN ARBOR.
Our Sports Shop Teems With Pretty Tgs.

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Letters have been sent to the
chief educational officers in the
state, and attempts are' being
made to have representatives
from all high schools on a re-
gional level, from all universities,
private and community colleges,
and junior colleges on the study
committee, Prof. Graf said. He
is chairman of the University
Committee on Language Instruc-
tion.
"Languages will have to be
moved out of the stepchild cate-
gory in schools in order to make
them as important as the world
situation today requires," he
says.
Enrollment Increasing
But. "we're over the hump," he
adds. Language enrollment is in-
creasing in elementary and high
school and more college students
elect a language as their major.
Even the fact that some schools
put languages on an elective ba-
sis should not be discouraging, he
points out. "This is a challenge
to the teachers to make their of-
ferings worthwhile, to improve the
quality of their teaching to at-
tract students."
"Here at the University," he
declares, "we feel that a knowl-
edge of foreign languages is a
necessary part of education."
The University has recently
changed its language graduation
requirements 'by testing on the
basis of proficiency rather than
"numbei of years studied. All en-
tering students will take an exam
which, if they pass, will be count-
ed as satisfying their language
graduation requirement. If they
fail they will have the opportu-
nity to take further language-
work in college, taking the test
again any time they feel they are
ready for it.
GlIee Club Touring
Foreign Notions
The Unviersity's Men's Glee
Club, 40 members strong, sailed

SWEATERS
~SHORTS

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*SIKIRTS

BLOUSES
PEDAL-PUSHERS

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THIS
THE

WAY TO
BEACH!

s

SHIRTS

As always,

besides the fine quality, you'll

enjoy our uniformly fair

prices.

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