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July 02, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1935

J#OUR SATUILDAY, JULY 2,1955

EAGUE DANCE COMBO:
Townsend Discusses Four-Man Band

By ANDREA MAYERSTEIN
"A well organized four piece
band can 'out do' a disorganized
seven piece band anytime," band-
leader Al Townsend commented.
In its fourth season at the Lea-
gue, the combo, composed of Gary
Hamilton, piano; Al Marvin,
drums; Jack Snavely, alto sax and
clarinet ;'and Townsend, trombone
and bass, have a library where all
their musical arrangements are
kept.
Townsend, who originated the
library, attributes the success of
the band to the library because it
keeps the band unified and or-
ganized.
Danceable Music
Straight danceable music is
most popular he finds. The band
also plays specialty numbers, med-
lies of older tunes and music in
the Latin tempo.
The jovial maestro embarked on
hi bandleading career in 1946
with a 13-piece band, which pro-
v'd*-d music forall-campus dances
on Friday and Saturday nights at
the League.
. Aiter this stint. he went on the
road with Gene Kruppa and Hen-
ry Busse's orchestras for two years,
doing some arrangements and
pl.ving trombone for both men.
Plans To Teach
At the present time Townsend
is wviting on his Masters Degree
an4 Doctorate in muc education
at the University. When he re-
ceives his Doctorate he plans to
teach music on college level.
S Commig
Events
TV Shows . .
A feature story about The Daily
entitled "Putting The Daily to
Bed," will be shown on WPAG-TV
from 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. Monday.
The program, "310 Weekly," will
discuss and describe the entire
process of printing a newspaper,
from its beginnings to the finished
product that appears on the news-
stand..
Guests on the program will be
members of The Daily staff.
"Storytime," from 6:30 to 6:45
p.m. will spotlight Jack Huebler.
He will tell an old Norwegian folk
tale and accompany the story with
harp music.
"Dateline Ann Arbor" will pre-
sent the local news and weather,
plus.interviews with people in the
community from 6:45 to 7:00 p.m.
Free Sports . .
Free classes are still being offer-
ed by the women's physical edu-
cation department.
Women students may elect mo-
dern dance, swimming, tennis,
diving, synchronized swimming,
golf and posture, figure and car-
riage. Interested students may re-
gster in Office 15 of Barbour
Gymnasium.
Recreational swimming is being
offered Monday through Friday
between 5 and 6 p.m., Monday
through Thursday at 8:15 to 9:15
p.m. and Saturday 2:30 to 4:30
p.m.
Co-recreational swimming has
been planned for Saturday, 7:15
to 9:15 p.m. and Sunday, 3 to 5
p.m.
Family Night for faculty is plan-
ned for Fridays between 7:15 and
9:15 p.m. Michigan Night for em-
ployees, their families and alum-
nae is set for Sundays, 7:15 to
9:15 p.m.
Music Recital . .

Prof. Emil Raab and Prof. Ben-
ning Dexter, both of the musical
school, will present a program of
violin and piano music at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday at Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Included on the program will
.be works of gSchubert, Charles,
Jones, Debussy and Paul Hinde-'
mith.
* * *
(Istory Lecture .
"Rgmance in Michigan History"
is the topic of the lecture to be
given at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in the
Rackham Amphitheater by F. Cle-
ver Bald, assistant director of they,
Michigan Historical Collections
His lecture will cover the in-
teresting and exciting events and
people in Michigan history, in-
cluding summary of the French
period with LaSalle; the British
period and the Pontiac War; and
the American period with the op-
ening of the Soo Canal and the
difficulties of the first ships
through it.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

he feels about wives helping with
publicity he beamed, "It's great!
She does a wonderful job and
works very hard."
T h-e dark-haired Townsend
hopes to keep the band through-
out next year and summer. The
group plans to play at fraternity
affairs and dances in the fall.
Townsend and his orchestra will
be featured at the League Dance
at 9:00 p.m. tonight in the League
Ballroom. Prices are 50 cents per
person and a dollar a couple.
Indian .Dances
To .Be Staged
Chippewa and Ottawa Indians
will recreate their songs, dances
and stories 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
front of Clements Library.
The midsummer Festival is part
of the University's summer pro-
gram highlighting Michigan.
In case of inclement weather,
the program will be held in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall.
Following the pageant, Clements
Library will hold an exhibition on
Indians of the Great Lakes. The
display will contain books, manu-
scripts and maps about the Otta-
wa, Chipawa, Potawatomi, Huron,
Miami, Sauks, Fox and Menomi-
nee tribes.

'U' Campus
No Shelter
From Heat
There are no signs of relief from
the heat in University buildings.
To find an air-conditioned roam
on campus, you will have to join
some of the fortunate research
scentists whose research mater-
ials require cool laboratories.
Or you will have to visit the
animals quarters, where cooled air
is piped in to keep the beasts need-
ed for experiments happy.
None of the University's class-
rooms, dormitories or offices are
equipped to keep occupants cool
in the 80-degree, humid weather
Ann Arbor has known for the past
two days.
According to one Plant Depart-
ment official, southern Michigan
does not have enough hot days
each year to warrant the huge ex-
pense of piping in cooled air.
Ducts for air conditioning are
built into most newly constructed
buildings on campus, officials re-
port. None of them have been put
into operation because of lack of
Legislature-appropriated funds for
that purpose.
A plant department employee
stressed that "one should not con-
fuse ventilation with air-condi-
tioning." There is modern venti-
lation in all of the University's
newer buildings.

PICr

'URE

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AiWs

-Daily-Fred Day
AL TOWNSEND
... Band Leader
One of his main ambitions is
doing more concert work as a solo
trombonist.
Townsend has appeared with
the Michigan band, and recently
was invited to be guest clinician
for three days at Jefferson City
College, in Jefferson City, Missouri.
While there he also appeared as
a conductor and solo trombonist.
Wife Helps
Townsend and his wife share
publicity duties. When asked how

O N L O C A T I 0 N - Producer Robert Rossen, left, shows
Prince Peter of Greece, adviser, an amphora made at Madrid
Pottery School for filming of "Alexander the Great" .n Spain,

B L O WI N C A S T A C K -,old reinforced concrete
smokestack, built in 1923 at a Louisville, Ky., oil refinery, looks
like a huge gun as it settles to earth after dynawiting.

'a

Come to Church
Sunday

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship: "But Truth is
Humble." Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship: "When Knowl-
edge Becomes Insight."
2:30 P.M. Meet at Wesley Foundation for infor-
mal picnic outing. Swimming, volleyball, picnic
supper and Vespers.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 -10:00 - 11:30
Daily-7.00 - 8:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Junior Church in Douglas Chapel at 10:45 a.m.
At the morning service at 10:45 a.m. Dr. Parr
will preach on the subject "Almanac of Lib-
erty."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Borger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship-Guest Minister Stephen
Ingram.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Due to 5th of July holiday the Sunday program
will be suspended until July 10.
House, 524 Thompson St.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and S. Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
Monday-3:00 P.M. Meet at Center for Picnic.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M. "The Growth of the Lu-
theran Church in America"-Pastor Yoder.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Sundays at 8:30 P.M. Theme: "Creativity in the
Arts."
July 3rd-No meeting.
ST MARYS STUDENT CHAPEL
Sunday Masses-8:00 - 10:00 - 11:30
Daily-7-:00 - 8:00.
Novena Devotions"- Wednesday evenings 7:30
P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30--Matins Service.
10:30-Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon
12:00-English Sermon.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Sunday-10:00 A.M.-Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.--"Lord Teaches US to Pray."
7:00 'P.M. Evening Service. "A Man Who Knew
How Long He Would Live."
Wednesday-7:30-e.Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks. Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
9:45-Student Class Studies-"Psychology of
Christian Personality."
11:00-Sermon Topic-"The Superior Christ."
4:00 P.M. The Student Guild leaves for picnic
on Huron River. Frank Laubach's "Wake Up,
or Blow Up" will be discussed.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CHAPEL
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Worship Services -9:15 and 11:00 Sermon-.
"Three Things We Cannot Escape." First in
a series: "Life." Dr. Kuizenga speaking.
5:45 Summer Students and Geneva Fellowship
will meet for picnic in the Council Ring.
THE CHURCH- OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M. - 11.00 A M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays--7:30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-i-1:00-1 :30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, and 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
Wednesday 7:00 A.M., Friday 12:10.
There will be no official programs for Canterbury
during the summer.

F

T O A I D J E T P I LO T S--Research engineer Bill Bauer
at Republic Aviation Corp., Farmingdale, N. Y., tunes a signal
beamed to a model of the F-84F Thunderstreak to test radio
apparatus as it dives, climbs, banks and turns. Objective is to
wvercome distance, altitude and weather problems.

SL L U S 1 0 N - iEvelyn Wanzer, of Chicago, makes use of
optical illusion, not muscle, to "support" the 272-foot Tower o.
Pisa, Italy, that ,has been leaning for most. of its 000 year.,

A
,9

UNWELCOME INTRODUCTION-This
tigress showed displeasure as a photographer got too close with
a camera on the animal's arrival in South Perth,-Australia, Zoo.

S O M E S A L A M I- This salami, seven feet tali,onetooS
thick and weighing 265 pounds, was packed by a Hamburg.
Germany, meat firm for a Chicago food exhibition.

11

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