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June 21, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-06-21

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NE 21 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Once Covered Ann.

1.

e bothered by summer's
niay be a relief; to know
Qe time a tremendous Ice
er hovered a large part of
t ice of that sort disap-
om this region only about
rs ago, according to Prof.
Hussey; of the, geology
.nt.
n pin-poInts the front of
er enough to say that it
n the University campus
ut where the Health Ser-
the Dental Buildings are
r, not a soul inhabited
n during the warm inter-
eriods,- he, says, although
rts of the United States
uipied.
adous elephants and mas-
amed ,around Michigan
e ancestral home of these
many millions of years
Africa, and they migrated
nited States by way of a

land bridge, which has since dis-
appeared.
Protection
As a protecuon against the cold,
the animals developed a layer of
fat just beneath the skin, and on.
the outside a heavy layer of matted
wool, and long, coarse, reddish-
brown hair, Prof. Hussey says.
The mastodon was especially
common around Ann Arbor, and
its bones have been found in many
of the swamps and bogs near the
city. These animals survived in
Michigan long after the ice had
melted from this region, and only
a few thousand years ago they
must have been a very common
sight. The bones of the mastodon
are frequently found showing
marks made by the teeth of wolves
or other predatory animals that
were accustomed to feed upon the
carcasses, the geologist observes.
I Complete bodies of the Wooly
Elephant, similar to the ones that
lived in Michigan, have been found

Arbor
frozen into the soil and ice of
Siberia, where they have remained
in cold storage for centuries, with
the flesh preserved, in such a fresh
condition that dogs were able to
eat it after the body had been
exposed.
Prof. McKeachie
Receives Award
Prof. Wilbert J. McKeachie of
the psychology department has
won this year's Literary and° Edu-
cation Class: of 1923 Award for
"general excellence in teaching of
undergraduate students."
The award, which brings a sti-
pend of $1,000, is given only to an
assistant professor or an instructor
and was instigated in 1949 by the
Literary College class of 1919.
Alumni of this class contributed to-
ward the prize five times and in
1954 the literary and education
classes of 1923 took over.

Doctor Says
Tetanus Shots
Not Effective
People who shrug off minor
wounds and cuts with "It's just a
scratch-nothing to worry about,"1
may be making a serious mistake.
So writes Dr. A. Burgess Vial in1
the current University Medical
Bulletin. No one, he declared, can
ignore the possibilities of a tetanus
infection.
Although tetanus shots have be-;
come standard procedure, they are
"not very effective" if the poison
has entered the nervous system.,
The shots may prevent but not
necessarily cure tetanus infection,
Dr. Vial said.
Estimating the current medical
approcahes to tetanus treatment,
he said removing the seat of in-'
fection has "theoretic value," anti-;
biotics only have "some: value,"
and the worth of cortisone is "yet
to be established."
-i ~

MOTT CONTRIBUTOR:
Ground Broken for Flint's 'U' Campus

Ground has been broken for thev
new University senior college at
Flint.
The first spadeful of earth was
turned for a $1,000,000 building,
the University's first in its Flint
branch, June 2.
Combined with the Flint Junior
College, the new branch, the first
of its kind in University history,
will enable students at Flint to get
a University degree without com-
ing to Ann Arbor.
Mott Donation
Charles S. Mott, Flint philan-
thropist who donated; funds for
construction of the building, cele-
brated his 80th birthday by turn-
ing the first spadeful in the
groundbreaking ceremony. He was
followed by University President.
Harlan H. Hatcher.
Mott was awarded an honorary
doctor of laws degree by the Uni-

'U' Aided

versity at a special convocation
following a dinner attended by
1,200. Mott's philanthropy has
made possible the buildings for a
cultural center in Flint including
the University's senior college.
President Hatcher said the col-
lege in Flint represents a "new
milestone in the history of educa-
tion in the state of Michigan."
Ruthven Idea
He said the idea of a senior col-
lege at Flint had its inception with
former University president Alex-
ander G. Ruthven and had receiv-
ed the support of leading Flint
citizens, especially Mott.
Mott, wealthy General Motors
stockholder, has twice been mayor
of Flint. Through the Mott Foun-
dation program in Flint, thousands
have benefited through education-
al recreational developments.

Also at the ceremony, Mott pre-
sented to the Flint Board of Edu-
cation a new $1,500,000 building
called the Charles Steward Mott
Community Center for Science and
the Applied Arts.
The idea of a University branch
in Flint was approved in principle
by the Board of Regents Jan. 21.
The University will administer and
staff the senior college operations
in facilities provided by the Flint
Board of Education.
Tentative date for the branch's
opening is September, 1956.
Michigan boasts nearly 30% of
the nation's total salt production.
Its output of 4 million tons of salt
annually is almost twice that of
any other state. Production centers
near Detroit and Saginaw.

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BOMARC
Development
The joint efforts of one of the
country's pioneer University Engi-
neering Departments and one of
America's aircraft manufacturers
in the initial development of the
new U. S. Air Force "BOMARC"
Supersonic Guided Missile, was re-
vealed by the Air Force, the Boeing
Airplane Company, and the Uni-
versity last week.
The University, as a subcontrac-
tor to Boeing Airplane Company,
participated in early studies on de-
fense weapon systems concepts and
later built research models of
ground control equipment for Boe-
ing, according to the announce-
ment released today. The program
began in ,195Q under contract to
the U. . Air Force.
BOMARO
Also revealed for the first time,
was the origin of the name of
the new supersonic missile .
"BOMARC." The first two letters,
,O, stand for Boeing-MARC for
Michigan Aeronautical Research
Center, which since has been re-
named as the Willow PRunRe-
search Center of the University.
The BOMARC Projeet involves
not only the design and develop-
ment of the missile itself, designat-
ed as the IM-99, but also all allied
control, ground handling and lo-
gistic Pquipment of the complete
defensive system. Successful firings
are now a part of the present dw-
velopment program, the U. S. Air
Force recently announced.
Directed by Prof. Harry H.
Goode, the Willow Run Research
Center is. a mayor unit of the Uni--
versity's Engineering Research In-
stitute. The University College of
Engineering, which celebrated its
Centennial last year, was a pio-
neer in aeronautical research and
education. It launched the first
such curriculum in the United
States in 1916, and has been a
leader in aviation research and
education since that date.
At the end of World. War II
there were so many demands upon
the University which required
space for instruction and research
that' the Federal government
turned over to the University its
famed Ford Bomber Plant at Wil-
low Run. As a part of the Univer-
sity, the Center has the coopera-
tion' of the vast research staff
throughout the campus. The Engi-
neerin, Research Institute Is under
the direction of Prof. Richard G.
Folsom. Its. pr" ;ram is managed
by a committee set up by the re-
gents of the University and has as
its chairman, the dean of the Col-
lege of Engineering, George Gran-.
ger Brown.

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