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July 01, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-01

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THlE MICIIGAN DIAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1955

1

WUOM Fare
To Featurex
Much Music
WUOM will present many spe-
cial musical treats for its listeners
this summer.
On the spot broadcasts of con-
certs, presented in Ann Arbor dur-
ing the summer, will be the key-
note of the University radio sta-
tion's continued emphasis on
"good" music.
Tle first concert to be presented
over the air will feature Emil Raab
and Benning Dexter, at 8:30 pm.
Tuesday. Also to be presented are
such groups as the Summer Session
Band, The University of Michigan
Woodwind Quintet and the Stan-
ley Quartet.
Special Events
Through the facilities of the Na-
tional Association of Educational
Broadcasters, special m u s i c a
events from other educational sta-
tions will be presented.
The Little Orchestra Society,
under the direction of Thomas
Sherman, will be heard in a series
of concerts recorded last winter on
the, campus of Hunter College.
.These concerts, which will be pre-
sented at 2:00 p.m. every Wednes-
day, feature new artists and new
works.
The first concert on Wednesday
will include music by Gabrieli,
Berg, Mahler, Enesco and Weber.
Alabama College Organ
Putnam Porter of Alabama Col-
lege will be featured in another
special, musical series. Playing the
Alabama College organ, he will be
heard in programs tracing the his-
tory of organ music from the pre-
baroque to the contemporary.
These recitals will be heard at 9:30
p.m. every Monday through the
summer months.
Another program of special in-
terest to the summer listener will
be "Homage to Poets." E. G. Gur-
rows, program director of WUOM
will read the 'poems on the air
and a; brief comment will be given
by Prof. Donald R. Pearce of the
English department.
Age Problem
Not Answered
By Retirement
Aged persons do not want to be
set aside and told to retire.
This was the one significant im-
pression on experts gathered at the
University's eighth annual Confer-
ee on Aging, which came to an
end yesterday.
"We want to keep busy. We
want to continue to have an active
role in community affairs. We want
independence," the experts were
told.
Government Study
Efforts to satisfy the desires of
the aged are already under way.
The government is launching a
study to determine age barriers to
employment and will attempt to
eliminate them.
A New York group will study a
suggestion that old persons who
have to be institutionalized be put
in "motel-like" residences so that
they can "help each other and have
a measure of independence."
Resting Not Enough
Dr. Robert E. Rothermel of the
American Heart Association in New
York said retirement is not the
grand and glorious life younger
persons imagine.

"People plan and save, looking
forward to the day when they can
retire -and do everything they al-
ways wanted to do," he said. "Then
they discover after three or four
months of fishing and resting they
are looking for something to do."
Picnic, Barndance
To Be Featured
A combination picnic and barn-
dance is one of the events which
will be sponsored by the InteTna-
tional Center this weekend.
Scheduled for todsv. the picnic
will be hela at German Park, b-
cated about six ard a half miles
out of Ann Arbor on Pontiac Road.
Students without rides who
would like to attend the picnic .
may meet ft the International
Center at 5:30 p.m. where trans-
portation \yil be provided. The
price, including both food and
transportation, is 75 cents.
Another activity which the
Center is -offering this weekend
is a guided tour of the campus
which will begin at 9:30 a.m. to-
morrow and continue until noon.
All students'are welcome to join
the tour free of charge.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
~M a

No Exit
DETROIT-({A'P)-Thinking it
was an open door, George
Waits, a railroad gandy-dancer
from Pulaski, Tenn., walked
through a 7-by-11-foot window
in Detroit's new city - county
building today.
"We don't have windows like
this ire Pulaski," said Waits.

Seven Plays Planned by DAC

Plans for fall production at the
Dramatic Arts Center are now un-
der way.
Seven plays are to be given dur-
ing the 1955-56 season, and the
company's professional cast ex-
panded by two members.
An announcement of the plays
chosen and of the new actors will
be made early in the fall, the new

season getting started during the
week of October 24.
Community response to the
DAC has been gratifying, accord-
ing to Burnette Staebler, president
of the Board of Directors. A spriig
telephone survey of 352 member
families conducted by the Center
has resulted in 130 offers of vol-
untary assistance.

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GENUINE COWHIDE BILLFOLD

Convenient billfold with these "plus
features"-removable pass case,

coin pocket, zipper ,compartment,
plus a handy pocket for your
credit plate.

plus tax

S M A L L 8 U T W I L D- One of 14-day-old wild boars,
from litter of seven found when their mother was killed by
a trpk. is fed in home of a German forester at Friedeburig.

GERMAN T R I B U T E--statue honoring "rubble
women" who helped clear war rubble in West Berlin, gets finish-
ing touch by Katherina Singer as real rubble woman watches.

WHITE NAVY

LIGHT BLUE

GREEN BLACK

TAN RED YELLOW PINK TURQUOISE

COTTON S
For the 4th of July Weekend
COTTONS FOR TRAVEL-FOR CAMPUS
FOR OFFICE-FOR DRESS UP
Voiles-Ginghams-Linens
Chambrays-Pima--Orlon
Priced from $8.95 to $29.95
and Cotton
Budget Cottons . * . $5.95 Store Hours
9:30 to
5:30
-__ _Mon.
through
Sizes for Tiny 7's to 15 'Sat.
Taller 10 - 44
Tall 10 - 12
Shorter 12 to 26n
se
REPEAT PERFORMANCE'0}f-
DRESS AT RIGHT
Tissue gingham plaid by --
Betty Hartford with a billowing
full skirt nipped by a raffia belt
In pink, blue and gold. Sizes 10 to 18. x x Shop in
$8.95 Cool Comfort
Cotton separates, too, at our Park with ease
Campus Toggery-1 112 blocks at Rear
from main shop. of'Shop

A R M 5 F U L L -- Mrs. Hildegarde Grzimek, wife of Frank-
furt, Germany, Zoo director, cuddles Baki, left, and Tomas, to
prove theory that raising gorillas is like raising children.

AT HOME IN A BREEZE-A Ludersl6-
footer, on a spinnaker run in Great Sound, Bermuda, scampers
to hold its position during an International Race Week event.

SEMI-ANNUAL SHOE SALE
This season's ~Spring and Summer Styles
STYLES: COLORS &
S OPERAS MATERIALS
* CLINERA PASTELS
* CLINGS WHITES
e BAREBACKS * COMBINA-
SHI HEELS TIONS
* ILLUSION * BEIGES
H E ELS * NAVYS
* FLATS * KIDS
* WEDGES * CALFS
* LINENS
Jacquelines
and .-sConnies
and and
Marquis Connie Lo-Heelers

HEDGE - H O P P I N G B L I M P? -- Despite appear-
ances, this is no low-flying blimp, but a 30-ton, 57-foot-long,
17-foot-high gas storage tank being moved through Philadelphia,

|

PARISIAN THREE-WHEELER--This
three-wheel vehicle, equipped with bicycle wheels and a 49ce
motor, is said to have reached a speed of 71 mph bk Paris testa,

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