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August 09, 1955 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-08-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,,

THE MICHIGAN IJAlLY TUESDAY,

... ...

ILLER COMMENTS:
MHRI Plans Research
In Behavioral Science

Youthful Protestation

Toll-Road

I

By MARY LEE DINGLER
"We believe it is ultimately pos-
sible to translate concepts of the
social sciences directly into the
words of the physical sciences,"
Dr. James G. Miller, head of the
Mental Health Research Institute
commented here recently.
Part of the University's Neuro-
psuchiatric Institute, the newly
formed Mental Health Research
division is expected to continue
the work begun three years ago
at the University of Chicago by
Dr. Miller and his colleagues.
Assisting Dr. Miller, will be Dr.
Ralp W. Gereard, neurophysiolo-
gist and Prof. Anatol Rapoport, an
expert in the field of matermatical
biology. After the Institute, which
Fires Down
In Ontario

TORONTO (P) -All-out

fire-

fighting efforts, rain and a break
in the heat wave, have whittled
Ontario's forest fire misery to the
lowest level in weeks.
Twerity-eight blazes were stamp-
ed out during the 24 hours up to'
noon yesterday while 11 new ones.
were reported, leaving the total
still burning at 87. Twelve were
out of control.
The picture brightened so much
.esterday that the firefighting
force was reduced to 2,000 men.-
Durin gthe peak of the fire season
mnore than 5,000 men were in the
bush.
Fires Still Hazard
Officials of the 'Ontario lands
and forests, department said, how-
ever, that the fire hazard still is
rated from medium high to high
across the province.
Efforts were concentrated on the
Cochrane-Kapukasing area, where
mor ethari a third of the province's
fires are burning. Two Air Force
helicopters and four bush planes
were on the scene to help ferry
men, equipment and supplies back
and forth between the hot spots.
Locations Listed
Of the 12 uncontrolled fires, the
Cochrane district had four and
Kapuskasing two. There were three
at Sioux Lookout and one each at
Port Arthur, Gogama -and Gerald-
ton.
Other fire locations: Cochrane
14, Kapuskasing and Sioux Look1
out 11 each; Sault Ste. Marie sev-
en; Chapleau six; Geraldton five;
Lindsay, White River, Sudbury,
'iveed, Gogama and Parry Sound
four each; Swastika and Port Ar-
thur three each; Pembroke two
and Kenora one.

will concern itself with the prob-
lems of Mental Health, has been
organized, additional members will
join the staff.
'Behavioral Sciences'
Primarily, the MHRI will deal
with a program of basic research
in the behavioral sciences. Dr.
Miller explained that the term 'be-
havioral science' refers to all the
overlapping biological and social
sciences concerned with the study
of behavior both human and sub-
human.
In the past, the Institute's re-
search teams have included repre-
sentatives from the fields of his-
tory, anthropology, sociology, eco-
nomics, political science, psychol-
ogy, psychiatry, medicine, physi-
ology and mathematical biology.
Dr. Miller and his associates will
continue to work with the idea
that the social and biological
sciences can be dealt with in the
same terms as the physical scien-
ces.
He said that the Institute be-.
lieves the methods and models of
the natural sciences definitely of-
fer a distinct, but as yet almost
untested, opportunity to advance
the study of behavior.
Mathematical Methods
At the present time the MHRI
is using mathematical methods to
arrive at what Dr. Miller terms,
"an integrated general behavior
theory."
Dr.yMiller admitted any such
theory would of necessity be rudi-
mentary, but he expressed the hope
that, "the same method which
brought control over the physical
world can also give us control
over ourselves.
Dr. Miller said the major pur-
pose of such a general theory
would be the scope of its applica-
tion not only in mental health but
in all fields.
Besides its research work, the
MHRI will also include a series
of seminars on behavior theory
and a consultant program for.
other units in the. state dealing
with research in mental health
problems.
Stanley Quartet
To Give 'Concert
The Stanley Quartet will present
its final concert of the summer
season at 8:30 tonight in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Mozart's Quartet in B-flat K.
589 will be the first selection on
the program, followed by Debussy's
Quartet in G minor. After the
intermission the group will play
Bartok's Quartet No. 6.
The program is open to the pub-
lic without charge.

'U' STUDY REVEALS:
Retarded Reading Treatment Hard

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JUNIOR GRADE PICKETS IN WISCONSIN -- Children carry signs in front of LaCrosse, Wis.,
Grandview Hospital and Clinic as they help their mothers protest the clinic's refusal to allow Dr.
Everett Gustafson to open a local practice after he resigned from Grandview. Clinic has contract
with doctors which does not allow them to practice for three years after resignations. Dr. Gus-
tafson delivered many of these kids.

Fate Hangs
In Balance
LANSING UP)-The fate of a
Rockwood-Saginaw Toll Road
hung in the balance today follow-
ing angry words between cham-
pions of the turnpike and a free
superhighway along a parallel
route.
State Highway Commissioner
Charles M. Ziegler, chief supporter
of the freeway, told the State
Turnpike Authority that the De-
troit to Kawkawlin freeway could
be completed in the next five
years.
If the freeway were built in that
length of time, toll road revenues
would be cut from 40-50 per cent,
said S'amuel P. Brown, member of
a consulting engineer firm hired
by the Authority to advise on the
feasibility of the turnpike.
Going Ahead with Plans
Authority members agreed the
turnpike could not be built if
revenues were cut that much.
Higgins told newsmen following
the meeting: "We're going ahead
with turnpike plans so that we
will' be in a position to build if we
can."
The legality of the Turnpike
Authority must be ruled upon by
the Supreme Court before bonds
for the $194,000,000 project can be
sold.
Despite uncertainty surrounding
the projebt, the Commission ap-
proved another large chunk of the
route - from the northern out-I
skirts of Pontiac to Eight Mile
Road in Detroit.
No Vote from Ziegler
Ziegler, himself a member of the
Authority, did not vote on ap-
proval of the Pontiac-Detroit
route..
Ziegler denied that he was try-
ing to block the project. "We're
not adverse to it, we're not fighting
you at all," he said. "We've got
responsibilities to the people."
The Highway Commissioner has
insisted that he must go ahead
with the freeway because of "ocm-
mitments" made to the cities of
Flint and Saginaw.
Construction on bypasses around
the two cities is already underway.
The bypasses are part of the free-
way.

PONDERS MARINE FUTURE -- Eugene Landy, 21-year-o,
honor graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Acaden
at Kings Point, N. Y., wonders what's in store for him aft
signing as an able seaman aboard a Sun Oil Company tanker
Marcus Hook, Pa. Denied a naval reserve commission because h
mother is a former Communist, Landy's case has stirred criticia
from Congress and others. (AP Photo)
Who Got the 48 Cents?'

Everyone seems to know what
makes Johnny a poor reader, but
a recently concluded University
study shows that the cause is us-
ually hard to determine and that
the treatment required is often
more complex.
According to the report, "A Re-
search Approach to Reading Re-
tardation," retarded readers fall
into three groups: those who have
definite brain damage, those who
are suspected but unconfirmed
neurological patients, and those
who have some emotional problem
that slows.their reading ability.
The inability to integrate and
comprehend abstract symbols was
singled out as the basic problem
of the second or neuologic, group
of non-readers. They suffer from
impairment of the basic techniques
of reading.
Not Used Effectively
The report stated that the third
group, those with emotional prob-
lems, had intact reading capacities
but for one reason ohr another
the skills had not been used ef-
fectively.
Those patients who were de-
pressed suffered from reading in-
ertia: those who were' anxious
lacked powers of concentration,
and those who were schizophrenic
got more from the sound than from
the sense of words.
The study was undertaken after

it was found that more than 50
per cent of the boys hospitalized
at the University Children's Serv-
ice had reading problems and that
behavioral difficulties are often
accompanied by reading retarda-
tion.
Over 250 children with reading
problems who were patients at the.
University Medical Center were
studied.
Research Team
The research team consisted of:
Dr. Ralph D. Rabinovitch, psy-
chiatrist; Drs. Arthur L. Drew and
Russell N. DeJong, neurologists;
Psychologist Winifred Ingram and
Reading Expert, Lois Withey.
With a dozen. different techni-
cal names for poor readers and
little agreement on the extent of
the trouble, the research team re-
ported that they found the whole
field of reading itself -hard to
evaluate.
They settled on "reading retard-
ation" as the general descriptive
term for the problem. It applies in
all cases in which the level of
reading achievement is two years
or more below the mental age
obtained in performance tests.
Motivation Main Problem
Motivation is the main problem
in the emotional disturbed group.
The patients in this group re-
ceived much from a combined cur-

riculum of psychotherapy and
reading lessons.
Commenting on the report, Dr.
Rabinovitch, chief of the Univer-
sities Children's service said,;"Poor
reading is by no means restricted
to America, it is equally prevalent
in England, France and Sweden."
"Popular literature has indis-
criminately blamed teachers and
schools. This is not only unfair
and false, it aggravates the situ-
ation and increases tensions," he
said, adding that "there is no easy
solution to the problem of poor
reading.'
Doctor Urges
'Conquering'
Of Disabilities
LONDON (')-A British phy-
sician urged people "unduly de-
pressed by some physical disability",
to follow the example of sports
figures who have overcome handi-
caps to achieve stardom.
Citing a long list of first class
athletes who have conquered phy-
sical disabilities, Dr. H. J. L'Etang
said their achievements are "the
outcome of a personal outlook on
their handicaps which we would
do well to encourage amongst our
patients." Dr. L'Etang, medical
officer of the big London firm,
published his findings in the
British Journal of Physiotherapy.
One of the finest examples of
courage discovered in his research
into the case histories of athletes
with physiac ltroubles, Dr. L'Etang
said, was that of American golfer
Ben Hogan. He suffered a crushed
pelvis, a fracture of the left leg,
a crushed shoulder and a broken
ankle in an automobile accident,
but came back to win the game's
highest honors.
Here are some of the other ex-
amples cited by Dr. L'Etang:
Ed Furgol, another American,
who won the United States Open
Golf Championship in 1954 in
spite of a crooked and wasted left
arm.
Tenley Albright, Newton, Mass.,
had polio at the age of 11. She
took up skating to strengthen her
muscles and at the age of 17
became the first American girl to
win the world figure skating cham-
pionship.
Bill Talbert, American Davis cup
tennis captain, Ham Richardson,
American Davis cup player, and
Lennart Bergelin, Swedish Davis
Cup player, all suffer from dia-
betes.

WASHINGTON ()-As it does
every working day, the U.S. every
working day, the U.S. Treasury
yesterday toted up the bad news
on ho wmuch we taxpayers owe.
As of Aug. 3, the Treasury re-
ported, the national public debt
came to precisely $277,126,109,640.-
48.
The 277 billion part isn't hard
to understand, but who got the 48
cents?
The man who knows the ans-
wer is William T. Heffelfinger. As
a 14-year-old messenger boy in
knee pants, he went to work for
the Treasury 38 years ago.
The national debt then was only,

comparatively speaking, a palt
billion dollars or so.
But World War I had begun, t
debt soon was to soar, and so w
William Heffelfinger. He now
the fiscal assistant secretary.
As for those odd pennies, yo
defense bonds help to account f
them. A $25 series E bond boug
12 years ago for $18.75 is wor
$26.12, for example, so the natio
al debt naturally comes out in o0
pennies.
As far as Heffelfinger knov
this is the only country that mak
daily confessions of its indebte
ness.

. .

Fr

Keep. Out!

1

t Unknowns' Boost Televisions'
List of Unresolved Problems

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FOR VACATION * FOR BUSINESS * FOR
CAMPUS AND BACK-TO-SCHOOL WARDROBE

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An exciting array of dark
cottons . . . Plaids,
prints and solids are all
featured in this collection
of dresses. Full skirts,
pencil-slim skirts, the
casual look, long torso
effect and the tairored
look are all included.
Come in today and select
the outfits you want
and put them on
lay-away until you
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SIZES: 7-15, 10-44
1212 to 241/2,
Tall 10-20

NEW YORK (RP)-It's probable
that a big majority of the tele-
vision audience is unfamiliar with
the name of Arthur Penn.
It's also probable that within a
few years his name will be quite
familiar. .
How will this happen? Well,
Penn might direct a couple of
Broadway stage hits or a movie
that cops a prize. Then, as the
warm wave of publicity breaks ov-
er Arthur Penn's head, he will be
callede the noted director of tele-
vision dramas.
But let's get this straight at
once. Penn is not a publicity
hound. He merely represents a
condition in the television indus-
try.
In Penn's own words: "Televi-
sion refuses to grow up and say
we're a legitimate medium. Its
people have to go to filmsor the
stage to acquire prominent sta-
ture"
Penn is a lean, quiet-speaking,
ex-infantryman who failed to re-
turn to his native Philadelphia

after World War II. Instead, he
took his discharge in Europe and
worked around the continent as a
stage manager for "Soldier
Shows." After studying philoso-
phy and literature in this country
and Italy, he returned to New
York in 1951, flat broke, and hit
NBC television "on a luckysday
when they were hiring 12 stage
managers."
He became one of the bright
young people whom that rather
fabulous fellow, producer Fred
Coe, drew around him in the de-
velopment of some of television's
finest talents.
Why does television fail, with a
few notable exceptions, to build
this stature of its directors, writ-
ers, actors, producers?
"Well," says Penn, "I think tele-
vision management is oriented in
its viewpoint around the come-
dians especially.
They interest the big sponsors
because they get big ratings and
sell the products. But they also

MELBOURNE (-) - A r my
guards and a double row of
wire fencing will protect the
feminine athletes in the 1956
Olympic Games here.
The guards will be on duty 24
hours a day at the Heidelberg
Olympic Village. They and the
fences-10 ft. and 8 ft. high-
will keep off would-be boy
friends.
a eamh
s e li
to flat
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stocking
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ter your legs
h1oned
7 jAM
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REPRODUCTIONS
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jlODERN and OLD MASTER
framed and un framed
AT COST
FORSYTHE GALLERY
Hours: 10 to 5 and evenings by appointment
114 N. Division Phone NO 8-9079

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A smart traveler, business or cam.
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Dresses
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We offer tasteful, beautiful wed-
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