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August 06, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-08-06

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TSE .MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGU

TilE MiCUlGAN IiAIIA SATURDAY, AUG13

Colorado River Project Faces More Delay

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Revelations
On Nudist
Camp Life
SPOKANE (P)-"A nudist wife
is just like any other wife about
clothes. She wants a mink coat
just as much as any other woman.
Women sit around in nudist camps
and discuss their wardrobes all
the time."
The revelations of life in a
nudist camp came from Reed
Suplee, Palmerton, Pa., president
of the American Sunbathing Assn.,
before the group's national con-
vention opened at a lake north
of here this week.
"We buy as many or more
clothes than anyone else," he said.
"We do nothing to bring attention
to ourselves."
Fat and skinny nudists get along
fine, Suplee said. "Nudists don't
pay any attention to the body.
It's the personality that counts."
Reversing the old saying that
"clothes make the man," Suplee
believes that, "in the nude, all
people are equal."
"When their clothes are off,
you can't tell a doctor, lawer or
minister from a laborer. Everyone
is on equal terms in a nudist park.
To me that seems true democ-
racy."
Nudists may dress in camp if
it's too hot, or too cold, or the
mosquitos are too bad. They are
also permitted to wear shoes and
stockings for comfort, and usually
carry cigarettes and matches in
their socks.'

CHARLOTTE AMALIE, Virgin
Islands (A)-A political storm has
stolen some of the interest from
the hurricane season in the Virgin
Islands.
Its center is Archie Alexander,
67, appointed governor of the is-
lands by President Dwight D.
Eisenhower in 1954. A Negro con-
tractor from Des Moines, he is the
first Republican governor since
Maps, Books
On Exhibition
At Clements
Early maps, books and docu-
ments make up a "This Was Mich-
igan display at the Clements Li-
brary for August.
Included in the works being
shown are a book containing the
first account of Lake Superior and
the Upper Peninsula, an early ac-
count of a voyage through the
Straits of Mackinac, and a 1672
Jesuit map showing a very accur-
ate outline of Lake Superior.
Also in the exhibit are the first
printed account of Pere Mar-
quette's travels to the Mississippi,
the Ordinance of 1787 which gov-
erned Michigan till it became a
state in 1837, a French map of
Canada and the Lakes area on
which Detroit appears for the first
time, a painting of Detroit in 1804
and the first directory of Detroit,
published in 1837.

civil government was established
here in 1931.'
Probably most of the 27,000 is-
landers don't care much who sits
in the governor's chair. But a
crowd of several hundred gathered
in the St. Thomas market place
last week demanding Alexander's
resignation or recall.
Editorial Attacks
Earle B. Ottley, editor of the
Home Journal here and vice pres-
ident of the 11-man Legislature,
is spokesman for opposition to Gov.
Alexander. His editorial attacks
employ such terms as dictatorship,
Hitlerism and "Little Emperor
Jones." He accuses Alexander of
favoritism, incompetence, economic
waste and disregard for the peo-
ple's wishes.
The governor agrees with his
opponents on one thing: the un-
derlying cause- of friction is the
Federal Organic Act which pro-
vides an appointed governor in-
stead of one elected.
Says Alexander Hates Islands

Small Virgin Islands Group
Opposes Appointed Ruler

i

Y'

The oppositions group conten
Alexander "expressed hatred f
the people of the Virgin Island
even before he came here. Th
say he abuses the islanders:ver
ally and holds them in contem
- all of which Alexander denies.
Leading residents who neith
support Alexander nor approve tl
campaign against him deplore tV
whole ruckus. As they see it,
successful businessman, inexper
enced in the ways of governmer
is at odds with a group of polit

ids

}

cians.

..........

Come

to Church

swings westward to form the Grand
Canyon, and turns south through
Lower California to the -Gulf of
California.
The area drained by the river
and its branches shown on the
accompanying map covers about
225,000 square miles.
Wide Interests at Stake
The interests with a stake in the
storage project range from San
.Diego and Los Angeles to El Paso,
Tex., and western Kansas. Cities
contending for municipal water
supply from the basin area include
Denver, Colorado Springs and
Pueblo, Colo.; Salt Lake City,
Utahh; and Albuquerque, N. M.
The controversy over the Colo-
rado's supply goes back almost
as far as the white man's popu-
lation of the West. Although there
is argument and contention among
neighbors almost all the way up
and down the river, one of the
principal conflicts. has been the
tug-of-war between the upper bas-
in states of Colorado, Wyoming,
Utah and New Mexico " and . the
lower basin states of California,
Arizona and Nevada.
In 1922 an interstate compact
divided the water at Lee Ferry,
Ariz., allocating 7112 million acre
feet each to the upper and lower
basins. An acre, foot is an acre
of water a foot deep, or 326,000
gallons.
Way Cleared for Hoover Dam
The agreement cleared the way
for construction of Hoover Dam,
which became the key to the lower
basin's use system. The upper
basin states, without storage dams,

have been able to use less than
2 and one-third million acre feet
of their allotted 7i/2 million acre'
foot supply. They would do much
better under the proposed Colo-
rado storage project.
The heart of the project would
be the Glen Canyon and Echo
Park Dams, respectively in Ari-
zona and near the Utah-Colorado
state line. Together they would
cost 600 million dolars.
Glen Canyon would have a hold-
over storage capacity of 26 million
acre feet and produce 800,000 kilo-
watts of power. Echo Park would
store 6,400,000 acre feet and gen-
erate 200,000 kilowatts.
Oppose Project
In Southern California, the
Colorado River Assn. and the
Metropolitan Water District oppose
the project as too big and too
costly. In addition, they argue
that it might cut into water allo-
cation pledged to the lower basin
under the 1922 agreement.
The latter argument causes
considerable alarm in Southern
California, the nation's fastest
growing area. In the past five
years the region's population has
swelled from 51/2 to 6%,' million.
Economists predict it will reach 10
million by 1970 - if the water
holds out. But it is estimated that
the present supply will support a
population of only 8,100,000.
Southern California twice in the
past has been forced to reach long
distances for precious water. Its
first effort was the Los Angeles
Aqueduct, which picks up water
from the eastern slopes of the

Sierra Nevada Mountains. - The
second was the Colorado Aqueduct,
which brings it water from Parker
Dam, on the Colorado.
It now is looking again -to the
water-rich mountains of northern
California. The proposed Oroville
Dam on the Feather River would
be the origin of water brought
south and through the Tehachapi
Mountains.
Backers Discount Fears
Backers of the Colorado project
discount Southern California fears
that the upper basin use would
cut the water pledged to California
in 1922. They say the Colorado
project would not only assure con-
tinuation of the pledged water to
the lower basin, but that it would
be provided in a balanced flow
through flood or drought.
Upper basin partisans argue that
the swift development of Southern
California was made possible by
the 1922 compact. Now, they con-
tend, it is only fair that storage
dams be built to give the upper
basin a similar opportunity.
In addition to struggles between
f"°ions ,there are quarrels between
and even within individual states
in the upper and lower basins.
Arizona and California are hass-
ling before the U. S. Supreme
Court over division of 11/2 million
acre feet of lower basin water.
East, West Fight
Within the state of Colorado,
there's a bitter fight between east
and west. The western slope coun-

try surrounding Grand Junction,
booming uranium capital, battles
the efforts by Colorado Springs
and Denver to make transmoun-
tain tunnel diversions of Colorado
basin water through the Rockies.
Denver, fastest growing center
in the mountain West, sees its in-
dustrial growth stopped dead by
1963 without more water. It has
gone to court trying to win trans-
mountain diversions from the Rec-
lamation Bureau's Green Mountain
Power Dam.
Another separate, through-the-
mountains diversion proposal is
the Frying Pan-Arkansas project.
It would cost 156 million dollars
to take about 75 million arce feet
annually in to the Arkansas River
for Pueblo's water supply and sup-
plemental irrigation of the rich
valley country extending into west-
ern Kansas.
Crises Accelerated
While the arguments rage, swift
population and industrial growth
are accelerating crisis situations
in which it appears that tough
decisions must be made.
Some circles are suggesting that
the federal government may have
to step in and allocate the meager
water supply - perhaps within
10 to 20 years.
Any such step would seem sure
to produce more hot battles be-
tweel cities, areas, state and re-
gions, with each convinced that
its growth and development would
cease without more water.

Sundoy

11

:

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-8:00 - 10:00 - 11:30
Daily-7:00 - 8:00.
Novena Devotions - Wednesday evenings 7:30
P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING

Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for worship. Visitors
welcome.

are

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

sented by the Department of Speech
and the School of Music tonight and
Mon., Aug. 8 at 8:00 p.m. in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. Late-comers will not
be seated during the overture.
La Sociedad Hispanica of the De-
partment of Romance Languages will
hold its last weekly meeting this sum-'
mer Sat., Aug. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Michigan Room of the Michigan League.
Social hour, impromptu talks and
Spanish music and songs. Refresh-
ments. Please notice this meeting has
been' changed from the Rackham Build-
ing to the Michigan League.

U. of M. Sailing Club rides will leave
the north end of the Women's League:
Sat. 10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m.;
Sun., 10:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. Meeting
Tues., Aug. 9, at 7:30 p.m. in Room
3G of the Union for all people going
on canoe trip,
Coming Events
Graduate Outing Club meets every
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at the Northwest
entrance to Rackham. Wear old
clothes, bring a bathing suit.

1!
I
'j
!

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Sunday-10:00 A.M.-Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "The Word of Truth."
7:00 P.M. "The Faithfulness of God."
Wednesday-7:30-Prayer Meeting.
We extend a cordial welcone to each of you.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, ErlandJ. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship.
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion group. "Encounter
With Revolution."
2:30 P.M. Meet at Wesley Foundation for infor-
mal picnic outing. Swimming, volleyball, picnic
supper and Vespers.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Nursery hour for children and also Junior Church
in the Douglas Chapel.
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. Professor L. La
Mont Okey of the Department of Speech will
be the speaker. His subject will be ."Do You
Know?"
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. "Practice and the Pres-
ence."
9:45 a.m. Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
The STUDENT GUILD has suspended its Sunday
evening meetings for the remainder of the
summer. It will resume its program in Sep-
tember.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran - Council)
'Hill Street and S. Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
- U A . f o.f. . ..r . .

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, and 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
Wednesday 7:00 A.M., Friday 12:10.
There will be no official programs for Canterbury
during the summer.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45: Bible Study
Sunday at 10:45: Worship Service, with Holy Com-
munion, with sermon by the pastor, "Christian
Charity."
Sunday at 6:00: Lutheran Student Club supper,
and program. Discussion of effective campus
evangelism.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
1000 A.M. Morning Service
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30-Matins Service.
10:30--Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon
12:00-English Sermon.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
10:45 A.M.--Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Press: "Christian Faithfulness."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
9:45-Student Class Studies.
11:00-Worship Service.

11 ,

1

SAFEGUARD YOUR MONEY
Carry your cash by means of
TRA VELERS CHEQUES

I

,,;

i CONVENIENT

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CHAPEL
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Worship Service: 11:00. Sermon topic, "What's
the Answer?"
1:45 Students meet at the Church for outing.
Bring 50c and a bathing suit.
5:45 P.M.-Summer students and Geneva Fellow-

s.

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Ill

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