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July 27, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-27

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JULY 2Z, I955

THE ItFCFIYGA-N PAILV

FX

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS:
Far East Has Rtsin US.

now

BARGAIN

DAY

t By HERMAN R. ALLEN
Ifit is true that the key to vic-
tory in- the ideological war be-
tween East and West lies in Asia
-.-as many experts claim-then
the United States can draw com-
fort from this fact: of the 34,181
foreign students studying in Uni-
ted States colleges and universi-
ties, almost a third come from the
Far East.
This would seem to indicate the
United States in years to come
4 can count on having some firm
friends in a region destined to
playan increasingly important
role in the world balance of power.
The continual export of know-
ledge is a phase of American en-
deavor in the field of winning for-
eign friends which, while not re-
ceiving the publicity given to mon-
etary foreign aid programs, prob-
ably will ay dividends of much
longer duaration. The foreigner
liring on a college campus for sev-
eral years is likely to become a bit
of an American himself. Back in
his native land he will be g an in-
terpreter of U.S. ways the resteof
'his life.
* .' Began After War
Students of many European and
eastern countries began to arrive
at American instutions as soon as
World War II ended. In 1946 some
6,600 students from all over the
globe enrolled in U.S. schools from
coast to coast.
This number has increased five-
fold since then. In the current 19-
54-55 school year 34,232 foreign
students were enrolled.
Aside from these students, 635
foreign teachers and researchers
were on the faculties of American
colleges, and 5,036 foreign doctors
were t4kining as interns or resi-
dentsihnAmerican hospitals.
About 6,500 American students,
meanwhile, were enrolledmin for-
eign universities, and more than
1,000 American faculty members
Dswere serving abroad.
Talk on Dead
Sea Scrolls
TO ToBe Held
A Symposium on the "Dead Sea
nScrolls" will be held by the Beth
Israel Community Center at 8:15
' p.m. Monday in response to many
requests, according to Rabbi Julius
Weinberg of the Center.
Speakers will be Prof. George E.
Mendenhall of the near eastern
studies department and Rabbi Dr.
Max Kapustin, Director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at
Wayne University in Detroit.
The scrolls found near the Dead
Sea in 1947 have "captured the
imagination of scholars and lay-
men alike," Rabbi Weinberg said.
"Studies of these documents, that
are more than 2,000 years old, have
'' brought a revelation in the field
of ancient Jewish history and Bib-
lical scholarship," lie added.
The Israeli government recently
purchased the four remaining
t scrolls not in their possession for
$250,000.
Dr. Kapustin will discuss the
scrolls in terms of what light they
shed on Jewish history. Prof. Men-
denhall will explore the relation-
ship of the scrolls to the early
history of Christianity and the New
Four From 'U'
ASet for Confab
Four members of the University
r faculty will participate in the
North Central Conference on
* Biology Teaching At the University
Biological Station in Cheboygan,

Mich:, Aug. 19-30, according to
Prof. Richard L. Weaver of the
natural recources school.
Besides Prof. Weaver, Dean
emeritus of the natural resources
school Samuel T. Dana, Director
of the Biological Sta/tion, Prof.
Alfred H. Stockard of the zoology
department and Robert Bowman,
Assistant to the Dean of the
School of Public Health will
serve as special resource persons
for the conference.

The Institute of International
Education, a non-profit concern
which administers several private
and governmental exchange-stu-
dent programs, surveyed 2,854 in-
stitutions.
Of these, 1,628, reported foreign
enrollment. They included univer-
sities, colleges, junior colleges, var-
ied institutions such as music con-
s e r v a t onies and chiropractic
schools, and in some cases the se-
parate schools or colleges within
a university.
The survey showed that nearly
30 per cent of the students came
from the Far East, still ravaged by
war in some areas. European en-
rollment was down to 15 per cent.
Thirteen per cent of the students
were Canadians. The same per-
centage was represented by the
near and middle east together. La-
tin America sent 25 per cent.
Canada Leads
The largest number from any
one country was from Canada-
4,665.
Fewer than 25 per cent were wo-
men. Slightly more, than half of
all foreign students are under 25:
Contrary to general belief, not
many-only eight per cent-of the
students came here on funds pro-
vided by either the United States
or their own government. Forty-
eight per cent reported they were
paying their own way. The re-
mainder were supported big either
family or friends..
More than 25 per cent of the
foreigners are enrolled in Califor-

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114
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STAPES WITH 1,000 OR MORE'
FO GN STUD ENTS
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1,000 STUDENTS TOTAL 3 181 « : >
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SPECIALS

SUPRE

E

-NOW -

ALL OVER THE STORE

nia or New York state schools. The
University of California and Co-
lumbia University in New York
City have more than 1,200 each.
Engineering, Humanities Ahead
Engineering and the humanities
are far ahead of all other fields of
study among foreign students,
each attracting 22 per cent.
The 635 foreign faculty mem-
bers come from 50 countries and
are serving in 39 states, District

of Columbia, Hawaii and Puerto Foreign physicians come from Columbia, Puerto Rico, Hawaii and
Rico. Largest concentration, 103, is 84 countries and are in training in the Canal Zone. Almost one-fourth
in New York state. hospitals in 42 states, District of of th 5,036 are in New York state,

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