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July 17, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-17

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"AGE 1701M

I HE MICHI"N DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1954

?AGE VOU1~ THE MICHIG4~1N DAILY SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1954

IF ... . , '..

RECENT BROADWAY HIT:

'Mrs. McThing' To Run
Wednesday to Saturday

By SUE GARFIELD
"Mrs. McThing," Mary Chase's
recent broadway hit, will be pre-
sented at the University in con-
junction with the summer pro-
gram "Woman in the World of
Man" Wednesday, July 21 through
Saturday, July 24 at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre in the League.
All performances will 'start at
8 p.m. The play is the second in
the series of productions this sea-
son, and will be directed by Prof.
Claribel Baird and Prof. Hugh Z.
Norton, of the speech department.
Christopher Stasheff, son of Prof.
and Mrs. Edward Stasheff, will
Portray the little boy, Howay, in
the the play. In the adjoining pic-

Marianna Hoad, daughter of Prof.
and Mrs. William M. Hoad, will
play the ragmuffin, Mimi, in the
production of "Mrs. McThing." In
the picture, she is dreaming of a
better life than the one she leads.
She soon manages to steal the toys

MARIANNA HOAD

CHRISTOPHER STASHEFF
ture he has been replaced by a
stick boy who acts just as his
mother, Mrs. LaRue, played by
Claribel Baird, desires.
Character Switch
"Howay" soon leaves the little
gentleman role and takes on the
opposite role, the toughie he wants
to be. A student at Angell School,
he will enter the sixth grade this
fall.

of the rich little boy, Howay. A stu-
dent at Angell School, Miss Hoad
will enter the sixth grade this fall.
Other Cast Members
The rest of the cast includes
Janet Stolarevsky as Carrie; Joann
Ragni, Sybil; Gilda Fox, Maude;
Sue Spurrier, Grace; Gertrude'
Slack, Evva and John Olson as
Nelson.
Others are Harold Radford, Ells-
worth; Lloyd Evans, Virgil; Paul'
Rebillot, "Dirty Joe;" William
Larsen, "Stinker" and V i c t o r
Hughes as "Poison Eddie."
Tickets for "Mrs. McThing" are'
on sale at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre box office from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily. They are priced
at $1.50, $1.10 and 75 cents.
Costumes for the production will
be handled by Phyllis Pletcher
while Prof. Jack E. Bender, also
of the speech department, will be
in charge of scenery. Business
manager is Bruce Nary.
Mary Chase's other recent plays
include "Harvey," "Now You've
Done It''The Next Half Hour,"~
and "Bernardine."
Mexico City's law requiring a
brick wall around all vacant lots
is raising protests among property
owners.

U.S. Women
Key Exhibit
At Clemnents
By BAERT BRAND
Glimpses into the lives of some
American women in history pro-
vide an approach on paper by the
Clements' Library to underline the
current University series portray-
ing "Women in the World of Man."
Highlighting women in history,
for instance, are two letters, one
by Martha Washington and another
by Mrs. Paul Revere.
Martha Washington, who in 1781
wrote to her home at Mount Vern-
on, inquires about the state of af-
fairs in the household. The letter
by Mrs. Paul Revere is to her
husband in Boston and is dated
1775.
Indian Capture
In pre-Revolution times Indians
captured two women. whose exper-
iences were subsequently recorded
and now are on display in book
form at the Library.
One was Mrs. Elizabeth Hanson,
who with her four children and
servant-maid, was taken captive.
The other was Mrs. Mary Jami-
son captured by Indians in 1755 at
the age of 12.
A book printed by Mrs. John
Peter Zenger, wife of the editor
who was tried by the crown in
defense of freedom of the press,
which is on display is representa-
tive of the character of the work
she did after her husband's death.
Historical copies of the music of
the "Battle Hymn of the Republic"
by Mrs. Julia Ward Howe and the
"United States Marine March"
composed by A Lady of Charleston
are also among the exhibitions.
Approaching the present, writ-
ings on Women Suffrage and the
rights and education of women are
included.
From the Civil War Period sev-
eral letters present were written
by the Grimke sisters of South
Caroline depicting their ardor in
fighting slavery.
Other books represent the wo-
man as author, poetess, playwright,
novelist and essayist. All the mat-
erial for the exhibitions belongs
to the Clements' Library.
Pianist, Singer
Concerts Slated
Two students of the University
School of Music will present con-
certs tomorrow in partial fulfill-
ment of their masters and bache-
lors degrees in music.
Dolores Lowry, soprano, will
combine forces with accompanist
Patricia Joy Arden to give a pro-
gram at 8:30 p.m. in Aud. A.
A pupil of Chase Baromeo, Miss
Lowry will give the concert to
fulfill the requirements for her
masters degree at the University.
The program will include selec-
tions from Stradela, Matteis, Pais-
iello, Brahms, Wolf, Duparc, Hon-
egger and Tschaikovsky. Miss Low-
ry, a graduate in the School of
Music, is from Chicago.
Boyd Halstead, pianist, will pre-
sent a concert at 4:15 p.m. in Aud.
A, to fulfill his bachelors' require-
ments.
His program will include Bach's
"English Suite IV in F," Beet-
hoven's "Sonata in D, Op. 28,"
Bartok's "Three Dances in Bul-
garian Rhythm," Brahms' "Inter-
mezzo in B-flat minor, Op. 117,
No. 2," and Chopin's "Barcarolle,
Op. 60." Halstead is a pupil of
Benning Dexter.
The recitals will be open to the
public.

Executive Program
National and international rep-
resentatives of American industry
will gather at the University to-
morrow to start the new Execu-
tive Development Program to be
presented by the School of Business
Administration.

College of Architecture and Design
Schreier, Aaron; Stadnyk, Jaro-
slav.
School of Education
Baylis, Shirley Ruth; Brainard,
Linda Palmer; Cilley, Nancy Eliza-
beth; Hamburger, Hilda Rosalyn;
Jewell, Robert Willard, Jr.; LaDue,
Mary Sally; Leja, Iris Marie;
Wright, Marjorie Ann.
College of Literature, Sciencej
and The Arts
Abrams, Lee Norman; Baity,
John Cooley; Barnard, Dean Stan-
ton; Bayliss, Betty; Belleville,
Philip Frederick; Bernstein, Neil
Norlin; Beuthien, Sally Jane; Blau,
Miriam Etta; Blazevic, Donna
Standardized
School Plan
Suggested
EAST LANSING (M-Louis H.
Schimmel, director of the Munici-
pal Advisory Council, proposed
Friday that school design in Mich-I
igan be standardized to save1
money.1
Addressing the Michigan State1
College governmental workshop,1
Schimmel said Michigan school
districts are not getting as much
school space as they could with1
the dollars they spend. They spent
100 million dollars this year.
Some schools are being built1
"in a hodge-podge fashion and by
architects "who may never have
built anything more than a gas
station before." School bond at-
torneys often are not familiar with
bonding procedures, he said.
Opposition to school standardi-
zation, Schimmel said, comes from
"local pride and architects."
The cost of Michigan schools
ranged from $12,000 to $30,000 a
room, he said.
Dr. Clyde M. Campbell of Mich-
igan State's department of educa-
tional administration, said t h e
State Department of Public In-
struction passes on all local school
plans, but he objected to stan-
dardized school systems.
The trend, he said, should be
toward experimentation instead.
MSC, Wayne University and the
University of Michigan all have
experts a┬░ailable to advise local
school boards on school plans, Dr.
Campbell said.
Robert W. Richards, member of
the East Lansing School Board,
said a yardstick for measuring the
quality of teachers would h e 1 p
school boards know how much to
pay them.
William Emerson, Iakland County
school superintendent, said the
people have never contemplated
a standard educational program.
Benson Sunburned
WASHINGTON WA'-Secretary of
Agriculture Benson suffered a
heavy sunburn last weekend and
has been undergoing treatment at
'the Naval Hospital at Bethesda,
Md. since Wednesday, an aide said
Friday night.
The secretary is expected to
leave the hospital Saturday.
The total funds put away by
private industry for retirement of
employes has been estimated re-
cently at $17 billion by several
sources.
California produces 230 different
crops in carload lots.
pa

102 DO IT!
All 'A' Students Announced

Williams Street Fire

Clague, Allan George; Cramer,
Miles Richard; Crandall, Marilyn
Ann; Currie, Janet; Cutler, Ro-
bert Marshall; Dawson, Dale B.;
Easom, Harry August; Edwards,
Melvin LeRoy, Jr.; Eisler, Thomas
Joseph; Fischer, Miriam Deborah;
Flahavin, Gerald Thomas; Fletch-
er, Peter Bacoii; Fox, Barbara Jo-
Anne; Gates, George Arthur; Gil-
more, Thomas Barry, Jr.; Gold-
blum, Barbara June;
Goodman, Paul Alan; Gorder,
Curt; Graham, Kenneth William,
Jr.; Granstrom, June Carol;
Green, David Marvin; Greenberg,
Paul William; Guy, Robert Dean;
Guyer, Mae Belle; Hausler, Rich-
ard Carl; Henkin, Barbara Ann;
Herlinger, Paul Max; Holloway,
Robert Warren; Holtz, William
Victor; Humphrey, Barbara Joan;
Hunt, Robert Harry; Jaffe, Mark
Maier; Johnston, Richard Charles;
Kauper, Thomas Eugene; Klein,
Lois Irene; Krickstein, Herbert Is-
rael;
Learned, Davis Walter; Lepard,
Nancy May; Long, Douglas Clark;
Marshall, Mary Lou; McKenzie,
Albert Regalvylle; Mikat, Kurt
Wolfgang; Moore, Claudia Irene;
Mullinix, Darrel Dean; Nelson,
Robert Bruce; Peer, William Bury;
Peterson, Phyllis Jane; Ray, Bar-
bara Ann; Reid, Robert Edwin;
Rosenfeld, Betty-Ann;
Russell, William Blanton; Silver,
Sandra Lea; Stasheff, Jame, Dil-
lon; Stevens, Mary A.; Stevenson,
Anne Katherine; Stolz, Benjamin
Armond; Tobin, Marilyn Beverly;
Uzelac, Michael; Vanselow, Neal

The following 102 students re- .
ceived no grade lower than "A" Jean; Bloom, Martin; Brenner,
during the spring semester of Richard Alfred; Cavitch, David
1954: Berl; Chapin, Donna Ann;

Arthur; Walma, Daniel, Jr.; Wal-
ter, Daniel Leo; Wansker, Nathan-
iel Jay; Wax, Harvey Isaac; White,
Arthur Jones, Jr.; Willar, Phyllis;
Willey,Edward Norburn; Witt,
Ronald Gene.
School of Music
Judson, Nathan Carter; Shelley,
Ann Maffett.
School of Natural Resources
Howe, Sydney; Jones, Bruce
Redmond; Satterlund, Donald Ro-
bert.
School of Nursing
Pawlowski, Regina Josephine;
Schutz, Dorothy Ann; Wohlschle-
gel, Ruth Elaine.
College of Pharmacy
Wiltse, Richard Charles.
School of Public Health
Buchwald, Merwin Elliot; Gor-
don, Larry Jean; Royer, Jean Ann.
Press Workshop
Ends Yesterday
Twenty six high school publica-
tions editors from the Great Lakes
area completed a two-week Uni-
versity Journalism Workshop yes-
terday.
Sponsored by the journalism de-
partment three such workshops are
presented throughout the summer.
This was the first for this year.
The remaining two are scheduled
for July 19-20 and August 2-13.
At their "graduation exercise"
yesterday morning, the editors
heard Prof. Wesley H. Maurer,
chairman of the journalism depart-
ment, describe the school papers
as a service to the school com-

G-

-Zander Hollander
FIRE -Fire engines were called to the back of the Cottage Inn
Restaurant on William Street at 6:45 p.m. yesterday as a small
blaze damaged part of the building and partially destroyed the
apartment above.
The most effective means of reaching students
and faculty of The University is the advertising
columns of The Michigan Daily.

4

r

I munity.

.. . .

A

F

.J..

LIBERAL TRADE-IN
In Value
of your old Watch
towards a new watch
HAMILTON ELGIN
BULOVA
HALLER'S JEWELERS
717 N. University

I * *I*1fA~ YY YY * YY YYY Y * YYI i YYr * YYIIYYY* II

pa~n sove"
PRE-INVENTORY SALE
of
CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
THIS SALE STARTS MONDAY, JULY 19th
The items offered for sole are from our regular stock of the finest
imported and domestic merchandise. The selected groups of clothing
and furnishings are reduced from 20% to 50%. Shop early to avail
yourself of a maximum selection.
CLOTHING
(alteration charges on sale merchandise)'

For Worry-free Trips, Use
TRAVELERS CHECKS
Travelers Checks offer both convenience
and safety for your vacation trips. You
can cash them almost anywhere-Hotels,

i

Restaurants, and

Stores-and

because

only YOU can cash them, you can enjoy
away-from-home security, too.
BUY THEM AT
ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Streets
State Street at Nickels Arcade
110S South University
Whitmore Lake, Michigan

SUMMER SUITS
20% off

REGULAR WEIGHT SUITS

(Selected Group)

20% off

i
,

20% to 50% off
(Selected Group)
Slacks, Sport Coats Topcoats, Tuxedos, Blazers
FURNISHINGS

S.

tbvF cv

SHOE SALE
(Men's Shoes Only)
Begins Monday Morning July 19th

CHAIRS
For every
need.
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.
Phone NO 8-7177

r

DRESS SHIRTS
$4.95 to $5.50 ... now $4.35
$5.95 to $6:50. .. now $4.95
$7.95 to $8.50... now $5.95
(Some white shirts included)
Lady Hathaway Shirts
20% off
SELECTED GROUP

Domestic and

Handmade Neckwear

Formerly
$1.50
$2.00
$2.50
$3.50
$5.00
$6.50
$7.50
$10.00

Now
.95.
$1.35
$1.65
$2.65
$3.65
$4.65
$5.65
$6.65

Imported

6wAmm

Group!
'/4
off
Group 2
$8.95

Includes sport shoes in Black & White-Brown
& White-all brown perforated shoes and a few
scattering sizes in all browns and blacks. These
shoes are taken from our regular stock and are
in such well known makes as French-Shriner
and a few Johnston & Murphy styles.
An assortment of our $12.95 to $14.95 shoes
including rubber sole dirty bucks, Two-tone Bass
Weejuns and a few sizes of cushion crepe or real
crepe sole sport oxfords. Plenty of Large sizes if
you need i 1 to 13 Lengths.

s

mlo
Aj

The hours you spend in Night
School can be the most profitable
hours of your life.
In a few weeks, you can pre-
pare for a better office position
and a higher salary.

Reduced from 20% upwards
Swim Shorts, Walking Shorts, Straw Hats, Felt Hats,
Sport Shirts, Caps, etc.

Robes,

s1
tr
t
t
i

Special group cotton hose . . formerly 75c. . now 3 for $1.65

F;
~

I A 4A

i II

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